romantic poetry blake and coleridge l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Romantic Poetry— Blake and Coleridge PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Romantic Poetry— Blake and Coleridge

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14

Romantic Poetry— Blake and Coleridge - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 350 Views
  • Uploaded on

Romantic Poetry— Blake and Coleridge. World Literature 2 Fall 2005 Dr. Whipple. What do we mean by “Romantic?”. Not mushy Not (always) about love ABOUT nature ABOUT experience ABOUT deep feelings (about things) AGAINST modernism, mass technology, soullessness

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Romantic Poetry— Blake and Coleridge' - Lucy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
romantic poetry blake and coleridge

Romantic Poetry—Blake and Coleridge

World Literature 2

Fall 2005

Dr. Whipple

what do we mean by romantic
What do we mean by “Romantic?”
  • Not mushy
  • Not (always) about love
  • ABOUT nature
  • ABOUT experience
  • ABOUT deep feelings (about things)
  • AGAINST modernism, mass technology, soullessness
  • AGAINST rationalistic takeover
  • NONCONFORMIST—in poetry, social and sexual relations, in spirituality, in politics

(When we mention poetry to people, this is often the kind of poetry they think of…)

romanticism the enlightenment
Romanticism & the Enlightenment
  • Revolt against aristocratic social and political institutions—not unlike Enlightenment
  • Fulfillment of promise of Enlightenment
  • Romantic musical movement (Beethoven, for example)
  • Throwing off Classical models, more direct, simple, style derived from folk speech
  • Utopian social thought—French Revolution
  • But…
romanticism in art
Romanticism in Art
  • Temeraire (Turner)
  • Salisbury Cathedral (Constable)
nationalism
Nationalism
  • Folk speech—plebeian poets
  • National languages
  • Celebration of folklore, cultural identity
  • Geography as determiner of national identity
  • J. G. Fichte: “Those who speak the same language are joined to each other by a multitude of invisible bonds by nature herself…”
  • National movements in Greece, Belgium, Italy, Americas (N and S), Germany between 1776-1870
nature
Nature
  • Reaction, in part, to and against the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution (Blake’s “…dark satanic mills”)
  • Nobility of nature (idea of noble savage)
    • Industrial revolution represented progress to some, bad things to others
  • The world is changing
  • Concept of idyll
freedom a la the romantic poets
Freedom (a la the Romantic poets)
  • Freedom of spirit
  • Freedom of conscience
  • Freedom of action
  • Freedom from conventional artistic aesthetic
  • Freedom from social restraints
  • The suffering of the Artist for the Art
  • apotheosis
  • Poetic experience as ultimate culmination
  • Imagination as ultimate authority
major poets major poems
Major poets, major poems
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge (“Kubla Kahn”, “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”)
  • William Blake (“The Tyger”, “Jerusalem”)
william blake 1757 1827
William Blake (1757-1827)
  • The first “multimedia” poet; revered for his poetry and his art
  • Wrote, illustrated, engraved, and printed his own books—total control over the experience of reading his work
  • Elements (ha!) of mysticism in his art and poetry; claims to have had visions from childhood.
  • Elemental themes—redemption, renewal, the new Jerusalem, God, God in nature
  • Imagination over the materialism and rationalism of the 18th century
blake and the mind
Blake and the mind…
  • This is your brain…
blake links
Blake Links
  • Blake’s “Jerusalem” in a modern context (BBC)
  • William Blake Archive
  • “Jerusalem” RealAudio file (and other quintessentially English tunes…)
  • “Garden of Love” mp3 file
  • Picture of the Tyger (Blake)
  • Website of “Tyger studies”
coleridge 1772 1838
Coleridge (1772-1838)
  • Yes, he did drugs. Specifically, opium.
    • DeQuincey, Confessions of an English Opium Eater.
  • Kubla Khan—allegedly written in a drug trance, broken when a friend interrupted him—poem is unfinished
  • Rime of the Ancient Mariner
coleridge links
Coleridge Links
  • Rime of the Ancient Mariner (read aloud)
  • Kubla Kahn (read aloud)