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Scirtothrips dorsalis (Chilli thrips). Joe Chamberlin Matt Ciomperlik Amanda Hodges Jeff Michel Cindy McKenzie S. Ludwig L.S. Osborne Cristi Palmer C. Regelbrugge L. Schmale D. Schuble. S. dorsalis. Synonyms: Chilli, Castor, Berry, Assam and Yellow Tea Thrips Host Plants:

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Scirtothripsdorsalis

(Chilli thrips)

Joe Chamberlin

Matt Ciomperlik

Amanda Hodges

Jeff Michel

Cindy McKenzie

S. Ludwig

L.S. Osborne

Cristi Palmer

C. Regelbrugge

L. Schmale

D. Schuble

s dorsalis
S. dorsalis

Synonyms: Chilli, Castor, Berry, Assam and Yellow Tea Thrips

Host Plants:

Over 150 host plants including banana, beans, chrysanthemum, citrus, corn, cotton, cocoa, eggplant, ficus, grape, grasses, holly, jasmine, kiwi, litchi, longan, mango, onion, peach, peanut, pepper, rose, soybean, strawberry, tea, tobacco, tomato, viburnum, etc.

economic importance
ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE

Major pest of:

  • strawberries in Queensland, Australia
  • tea in Japan and Taiwan
  • citrus in Japan and Taiwan (Chiu et al. 1991, Tatara and Furuhushi 1992, Tschuchiya et al 1995)
  • cotton in the Ivory Coast (Bournier 1999)
  • soybeans in Indonesia (Miyazaki et al.1984)
  • chillies and castor bean in India
  • peanuts in several states in India (Mound and Palmer 1981).
  • Ananthakrishnan (1984) also reports damage to the following hosts: cashew, tea, chillies, cotton, tomato, mango, castor bean, tamarind, and grape.
  • Rose in India
is scirtothrips dorsalis a serious economic pest for the us
Is Scirtothrips dorsalis a Serious Economic Pest for the US?

Assuming an overall U.S. crop yield loss from Chilli Thrips of 5 percent the total crop value loss would equal $3.0 billion (primary hosts $583 million and secondary hosts $2.43 billion).

Assuming an overall U.S. crop yield loss from Chilli Thrips of 10 percent the total crop value loss would equal $5.98 billion (primary hosts $1.2 billion and secondary hosts $4.78 billion).

identification
Identification

http://mrec.ifas.ufl.edu/lso/DOCUMENTS/identification%20aid.pdf

slide8

Thrips-Adults

Western

Flower thrips

Chilli thrips

slide10

Chilli Thrips-Adult

(recently emerged)

slide13

Chilli Thrips

(mixed stages)

2nd instar

1st instar

slide15

Chilli Thrips-Adults

Egg Blister

slide16

Embryo Removed from Egg Blister

Egg Blister

Embryo

slide18

Chilli Thrips

1st Instar Larva

Egg to 2nd Instar

F° Days

60.8 17.2

68 12.0

77 7.6

86 5.8

slide19

Chilli Thrips

2nd Instar Larva

F° Days

60.8 12.4

68 8.1

77 6.4

86 4.4

slide20

Chilli Thrips

Pre-Pupa & Pupa

F° Days

60.8 9.9

68 6.5

77 4.4

86 3.7

Pre-pupa

Pupa

over wintering of pupae
Over Wintering of Pupae

Grapes

64.4% in liter

16.2% in branch zone

12.5% in soil

6.9% leaf zone

Okada & Kudo 1982

hosts
Hosts

Acanthaceae Strobilanthes dyerianus Mast.

Araliaceae Hedera helix L.

Berberidaceae Mahonia bealei

Caprifoliaceae Viburnum suspensum

Combretaceae

Conocarpus erectus

Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f.

Compositae Gerbera jamesonii H. Bolus ex Hook. f.

Ericaceae Rhododendron spp.

Euphorbiaceae Ricinus communis

Illiciaceae Illicium floridanum Ellis

Moraceae Ficus elastica

hosts28
Hosts

Oleaceae

Jasminum sambac (L.) Ait.

Ligustrum japonicum Thunb.

Pittosporaceae Pittosporum tobira (Thunb.) Ait. f.

Rosaceae

Raphiolepsis indica

Rhaphiolepis umbellata (Thunb.) Mak.

Rosa sp.

Rubiaceae

Gardenia jasminoides

Richardia brasiliensis Gomes

hosts29
Hosts

Rutaceae

Citrus sp.

Murraya paniculata (L.) Jack

Solanaceae

Capsicum annuum L.

Capsicum frutescens L.

Capsicum sp.

hosts30
Hosts

Amaranthaceae Celosia argentea L.

Araceae Philodendron sp.

Araliaceae Schefflera arboricola (Hayata) Merrill

Balsaminaceae Impatiens walleriana Hook. f.

Compositae Coreopsis sp.

Compositae Zinnia sp.

Euphorbiaceae Poinsettia pulcherrima Graham

Gentianaceae Eustoma grandiflorum (Raf.) Shinn.

Geraniaceae Pelargonium x hortorum Bailey

Hamamelidaceae Loropetalum chinense (R. Br.) Oliver

hosts31
Hosts

Labiatae

Plectranthus scutellarioides (L.) R. Br.

Salvia sp.

Leguminosae Phaseolus vulgaris L.

Lythraceae Cuphea sp.

Marantaceae Stromanthe sanguinea (Hook.) Sonder

Onagraceae Gaura lindheimeri

Rubiaceae Pentas lanceolata (Forssk.) Deflers

Scrophulariaceae Antirrhinum majus L.

Solanaceae Petunia sp.

Verbenaceae

Duranta erecta

Glandularia x hybrida (Grön. & Rüm.) Neson & Pruski

slide32

Damaged Flower Bud

and Leaves

Mannion

Photos: L. Osborne, UF-IFAS

slide33

Comparison of damaged and normal leaf

Normal new growth

Damaged new growth

Mannion

Photos: L. Osborne, UF-IFAS

management chemical
ManagementChemical

See Chilli Thrips Management: Osborne & Ludwig

http://www.mrec.ifas.ufl.edu/lso/THRIPS/CHILLIWEB2/chilli-doc/CHILLI%20THRIPS%20Management.pdf

what can growers do
What Can Growers Do?
  • Pay attention to information distributed by SAF, the propagators, media, pesticide companies and/or University and ARS scientists.
  • Implement INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

IRM

rotate
ROTATE

ROTATE

ROTATE

effective products 7 different modes of action

Table based on data from:

Ciomperlik

Ludwig

Osborne

Seal

Effective Products7 Different Modes of Action

Acephate Foliar N, G, L

Acetamiprid Foliar N, G, L

Clothianidin Foliar N, G, L

Dinotefuran Foliar N, G, L

Imidacloprid Foliar N, G, L

Thiamethoxam Foliar N, G, L

Spinosad Foliar N, G, L

Abamectin Foliar N, G, L

Flonicamid Foliar G

Chlorfenapyr Foliar G

Pyridalyl Foliar G

N=Nursery

G=Greenhouse

L=Landscape

Compounds in Yellow = the same MOA

slide53
PLAN

Identify All Pesticides Registered for the Pest and Crop

Determine Plant Safety

Determine Labeled Frequency

Determine Other Use Restrictions

Organize Treatments (MOA…)

Don’t Forget Other Pests!

why biological control
Why Biological Control?
  • To help manage pesticide resistance in populations of Western flower thrips.
  • Chilli Thrips was attacking basil, mint, and peppers in organic production systems.
  • Thrips control impacted implementation of IPM programs in many ornamental crop systems.
  • Chemical control in the landscape is

NOT SUSTAINABLE

slide57

Control of Chilli ThripsChilly Chili Pepper

Study 1

N=20

5 plants/Unit

4 Units/treatment