dynamic thermal ratings for overhead lines l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 26

Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 953 Views
  • Uploaded on

Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines. Philip Taylor, Irina Makhkamova, Andrea Michiorri Energy Group, School of Engineering Durham University. Overview. Research Overview Overhead Line Thermal Modelling Lumped Parameter Computational Fluid Dynamics Comparisons

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines' - Lucy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
dynamic thermal ratings for overhead lines

Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

Philip Taylor, Irina Makhkamova, Andrea Michiorri

Energy Group, School of Engineering

Durham University

overview
Overview
  • Research Overview
  • Overhead Line Thermal Modelling
    • Lumped Parameter
    • Computational Fluid Dynamics
    • Comparisons
  • Thermal State Estimation
  • Further work

Energy Group

School of Engineering

research aims
Research Aims
  • The use of dynamic thermal ratings to:
    • Increase utilisation of existing power system assets.
    • Facilitate increased capacities and energy yields for DG
    • Develop a real time controller

Energy Group

School of Engineering

project consortium
Project Consortium
  • Part funded by DIUS

Energy Group

School of Engineering

project phases
Project Phases
  • Thermal Modelling (OHL, UGC and TFMR)
  • Thermal State Estimation
  • DG constrained connection techniques
  • System Simulation
  • Network and Meteorological Instrumentation
  • Open Loop Trials
  • Closed Loop Trials

Energy Group

School of Engineering

what do we mean by dynamic thermal ratings
Aim

To increase the energy transferred through the network under normal operating conditions

Without reducing component lifetime or network security

Measurements

Availability of a limited number of environmental measurements

Electrical measurements available from SCADA

What Do We Mean By Dynamic Thermal Ratings?
  • How
    • Exploit headroom which is available for a reasonable amount of time
    • Never exceed the standard component continuous operation design temperature

Energy Group

School of Engineering

lumped parameter model standard comparison
Lumped Parameter Model – Standard comparison
  • IEC TR 61597
  • IEEE 738
  • CIGRE WG 22.12 in ELECTRA 144 – 1992
  • The IEC model has been selected

C

B

A

Maximum current carrying capacity – models comparison

Conductor ACSR 175mm2 LYNX

Wd=90º, Ta=25 [ºC], Sr=0 [W/m2]

Energy Group

School of Engineering

lumped parameter model simulation
Lumped Parameter Model – Simulation

The network and its geographical location

Costal area, west coast, subject to sea breeze

Three directions for the line, the smallest rating has to be considered

Network diagram and line characteristics

Voltage: 132kV, line length: 7km, conductor: ACSR 175mm2 LYNX

Energy Group

School of Engineering

lumped parameter model simulation results
Lumped Parameter Model – Simulation results

The simulations suggest that consistent headroom is available when using daily or hourly ratings

Comparison of energy transfer capacity for different rating period

Minimum daily rating compared with seasonal ratings

Weather data from Valley (Anglesey)

Energy Group

School of Engineering

modelling the thermal state of acsr 410 conductor exposed to cross wind

Outlet Conductor Inlet

Air domain

Modelling the thermal state of ACSR 410 conductor exposed to cross wind

ASCR410: 7 steel strands surrounded by 27 aluminium strands.

Simplified geometry

The outer diameter is 28.5mm

M. Isozaki and N. Iwama. Verification of forced convective cooling from conductors in breeze wind by wind tunnel testing. (0-7803-7525-4/02, 2002 IEEE).

2-D calculation scheme

Energy Group

School of Engineering

modelling thermal state of acsr 410 conductor exposed to cross wind
Modelling thermal state of ACSR 410 conductor exposed to cross wind

Energy Group

School of Engineering

slide14

Modelling the thermal state of LYNX conductor exposed to cross wind

Real geometry

Simplified geometry

Computational grid

Lynx consists of 30 strands of an aluminium wire and

7 strands of a steel wire.

Outer diameter is 19.5 mm

Energy Group

School of Engineering

m odelling the thermal state of lynx conductor exposed to cross wind
Modelling the thermal state of Lynx conductor exposed to cross wind

The ambient temperature is 293 K; I = 433A.

CFD predicts 16 K headroom existence

Energy Group

School of Engineering

impact of solar radiation on the conductor temperature
Impact of solar radiation on the conductor temperature

Initial conditions: Cross wind = 2 m/s, Current = 433A, T ambient= 293 K

  • Additional source of heat emanates from solar radiation
  • q = α · d · s
  • α = solar absorption coefficient, this
  • varies from 0.3 to 0.9
  • d = diameter of conductor (m)
  • s = intensity of solar radiation (W/m2),
  • a typical value being 800 (W/m2)

Energy Group

School of Engineering

lynx conductor exposed to cross wind comparison with measured data on distribution network
Lynx conductor exposed to cross wind - comparison with measured data on distribution network

Energy Group

School of Engineering

cfd model the lynx conductor exposed to cross wind comparison with real data
CFD Model: the Lynx conductor exposed to cross wind - comparison with real data

Energy Group

School of Engineering

slide19

Lynx conductor exposed to parallel wind

Temperature of the conductor vs. velocity for cross and parallel wind conditions

Calculation scheme

Outlet

Conductor

Temperature, K

Inlet

Air domain

Conductor

Aluminium

Wind velocity, m/s

Steel core

The ambient temperature is 293 K; I = 433A

Energy Group

School of Engineering

cfd lumped comparison cross wind temperature
CFD / Lumped comparisonCross wind, temperature

Conductor temperature. CFD/Lumped parameter comparison

Conductor: ACSR 175mm2 LYNX, Ta=20'C, I=433A, Wd=90'

Energy Group

School of Engineering

cfd lumped comparison parallel wind temperature
CFD / Lumped comparisonParallel wind, temperature

Conductor temperature. CFD/Lumped parameter comparison

Conductor: ACSR 175mm2 LYNX, Ta=20'C, I=433A, Wd=0'

Energy Group

School of Engineering

state estimation objectives
State Estimation - Objectives
  • Produce reliable estimates of maximum current carrying capacity of power system components
  • Identify minimum and most probable value
  • Possibility to calculate a rating for a given probability/risk

Energy Group

School of Engineering

state estimation simulation results
State Estimation – Simulation results

Minimum, mean and maximum hourly rating

Energy Group

School of Engineering

conclusions
Conclusions
  • Encouraging results regarding potential headroom
  • Lumped parameter models more conservative than CFD
  • Initial comparisons to real data encouraging
  • Need to further validate models with real data
  • Need to validate state estimation with real data
  • Site installation
  • Trials (open and closed loop)

Energy Group

School of Engineering