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Day 3—Cherokee Indian Festivals. March—The First New Moon of Spring August—The Green Corn Dance September—The Ripe Corn Ceremony Fall—Friendship Ceremony or Atohuna Lasted 7 days and nights. There were dances every night. “The Booger Dance” was especially enjoyed by the children.

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day 3 cherokee indian festivals
Day 3—Cherokee Indian Festivals
  • March—The First New Moon of Spring
  • August—The Green Corn Dance
  • September—The Ripe Corn Ceremony
  • Fall—Friendship Ceremony or Atohuna

Lasted 7 days and nights.

There were dances every night.

“The Booger Dance” was especially

enjoyed by the children.

the booger dance
The Booger Dance
  • Men traded clothing with a friend and put on scary wooden masks.
  • The masks represented enemies, evil spirits, or creatures.
  • Men pretended they were enemies and acted silly to make enemies look foolish.
  • Children tried to guess which was their father under the mask.
slide3

Cherokee Indian Booger Dance Masks

http://www.chattoogariver.org/index.php?req=booger&quart=F2003

Web site for more information about Booger Dance.

slide4

http://static.zoovy.com/img/jewelville/W180-H180-Bffffff/img_0003.jpghttp://static.zoovy.com/img/jewelville/W180-H180-Bffffff/img_0003.jpg

slide10

Cherokee Indian Masks

Uktena -- the great feathered serpent who terrorized the Cherokee people in ancient times and has been forever immortalized as the Cherokee Dragon. This mask is made of gourd, turkey feathers, deer antlers, rawhide and natural Blood Root dye and can be view at the Cherokee Casino in Catoosa Oklahoma.

Snake Mask -- Gourd mask with natural Black Walnut and Blood Root Dye with rawhide hair.

http://www.cherokeebooger.com/_wsn/page2.html

slide12

Sa-Cinn Indian Masks

Thunderbird Spirit Mask

Thunderbird loved humans and felt as a protectorate towards humans.It was believed long ago that the thunderbird took human form at times when humans were in great need of guidance. Disguised as a warrior or elder thunderbird would come from out of the woods, give his advice and then go back into the forest and disappear

Tsonoqwa

The wild woman of the woods depicted here with closed eyes and open mouth. The wild woman of the woods legend kept children inside the longhouse at night. The wild woman was told to look in the forest at night in the woods for lost children from the villages.

http://www.sa-cinn.com/joebolton.htm

slide13

Frog Transformation Mask

This mask depicts the frog transforming in to a human form. Among the Northern Tribes frog is a clan symbol and is highly respected as a guardian symbol which is why frog adorns so may totems.

Copper Eagle

Copper was a rare and highly valuable metal to our native people. This eagle is painted in copper to show how much the eagle is revered as a spiritual symbol, and how much that this bird enriches our lives that it is as prized as the valuable copper.

http://www.sa-cinn.com/joebolton.htm

slide14

Nuu-Chah-Nulth Indian Nation Mask

Spirit of Whale Hunter

http://www.sa-cinn.com/new_page_21.htm

slide15

Ceremonial and decorative Northwest Coast masks from Haida, Salish, and Nootka Indian carvers.

Ancestors Dream Mask

Thunderbird Moon Mask

http://www.dorothygrant.com/art/masks/main.html

slide16

Haida Warrior

Female Moon Mask

http://www.dorothygrant.com/art/masks/main.html

slide17

Big Killer Whale

“Sonoqua” Wild Women

http://www.dorothygrant.com/art/masks/main.html

slide18

Potlatch Puppet Mask

Frog Prince

http://www.dorothygrant.com/art/masks/main.html

slide19

   Alaska Native Masks

Northwest Coast masks and war helmets carved by a Tlingit artist.

Eagle Ancestor

Wild Women of Vancouver

http://www.alaskanativeartists.com/masks.htm

slide20

Human Portrait Mask

Raven Portrait Mask

http://www.alaskanativeartists.com/masks.htm

slide21

Wisdom of Forgiveness

Copper Mountain Lover Mask

http://www.alaskanativeartists.com/masks_4.htm

Maskhttp://www.alaskanativeartists.com/masks_3.htm

slide22

Tlingit Beaver Mask

Tlingit Human Mask

http://www.alaskanativeartists.com/masks_2.htm

slide23

A Witness to Change

Bear Clan Dancer

http://www.alaskanativeartists.com/masks_2.htm

students make a mask
Students Make A Mask
  • Use your imagination to make a Cherokee Indian Booger Dance festival mask representing a Cherokee Indian enemy, evil spirit, or creature.
  • Write a paragraph that includes:
    • The name of your mask and the Cherokee enemy, evil spirit, or creature it represents.
    • A summary of “the Booger Dance” festival.