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WHMIS GENERIC TRAINING

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    1. August 2009 1 Annual WHMIS Review Training

    2. August 2009 2 The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System is a program developed by the federal and provincial governments, industry and labour as a national hazard communication system. It allows for the easy identification of hazards associated with a hazardous material and provides information on the safe handling, use and storage of that material. The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System is a program developed by the federal and provincial governments, industry and labour as a national hazard communication system. It allows for the easy identification of hazards associated with a hazardous material and provides information on the safe handling, use and storage of that material.

    3. August 2009 3 The Main Components of WHMIS Labels (Supplier and Workplace) Material Safety Data Sheets Worker Education and Training (Generic and Annual Review)

    4. August 2009 4 RESPONSIBILITIES Manufacturer/Supplier Classification Label all controlled products as a condition of sale Provide a MSDS as a condition of sale Review and update MSDS every three years Employer Ensure that controlled products are labeled Obtain an up to date MSDS for all controlled products used in the workplace Provide worker education and training The manufacture must classify the product according to its inherent physical properties, develop a material safety data sheet and label the product as a condition of sale. The Board as an employer must ensure that up-to-date material safety data sheets are available, all products are labeled appropriately and all employees can use the information on the labels and msds to use, store and handle the product safely. The manufacture must classify the product according to its inherent physical properties, develop a material safety data sheet and label the product as a condition of sale. The Board as an employer must ensure that up-to-date material safety data sheets are available, all products are labeled appropriately and all employees can use the information on the labels and msds to use, store and handle the product safely.

    5. August 2009 5 RESPONSIBILITIES Workers The right to know about hazardous materials you may be exposed to on the job including the right to review labels and MSDS and to receive training The right to be consulted in the content and delivery of the training Responsible to report missing or illegible labels, missing or out of date MSDS, and Responsible to work in a safe manner and follow all work procedures required by the employer As workers, and we are all workers, we have the right to known about hazardous materials that we may be exposed to at work and be given access to information to use, store and handle these materials safely. This is why all msds are kept in a binder in the staff room so all staff have access. We also have the right to be consulted about the training this is accomplished through a consultation with the Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee. We also have responsibilities: If you bring a hazardous material into the workplace for work purposes, it may be WHMIS-controlled, even if you bought it as a WHMIS-exempt product. Therefore, all purchases should be done according to Board purchasing procedures. In addition, you are responsible for acquiring a msds and providing a copy for the site binder. If you notice that either a label is illegible or that a msds is missing or out of date, you must report this to your supervisor or site administration so that a workplace label can be put on or a up-to-date msds sought. And as allways, we need to follow all safe handling procedures required. As workers, and we are all workers, we have the right to known about hazardous materials that we may be exposed to at work and be given access to information to use, store and handle these materials safely. This is why all msds are kept in a binder in the staff room so all staff have access.

    6. August 2009 6 CLASSIFICATION WHMIS requires the manufacturer to classify their hazardous materials into one or more of the following (6) Hazard Classes and (8) symbols. When a new hazardous material is created, the manufacturer is required to classify the material into one or more hazard classes. A product can have more than 1 hazard class, however, there will be a primary class and secondary classes. When a new hazardous material is created, the manufacturer is required to classify the material into one or more hazard classes. A product can have more than 1 hazard class, however, there will be a primary class and secondary classes.

    7. August 2009 7 CLASS A: COMPRESSED GAS Class A: Compressed Gas Examples may include aerosol containers, fire extinguishers, acetylene bottles, and oxygen bottles. When storing compressed gas bottles, it is important to protect them from mechanical damage. Should the valve stem be broken or the cylinder fail, the bottle could act like a missal. The valve should have a cap to protect the valve stem, be stored upright and be chained to prevent falling. It is also important to keep these materials in cool areas away from sources of heat. Heating these containers can cause pressure to build up resulting in explosion. Class A: Compressed Gas Examples may include aerosol containers, fire extinguishers, acetylene bottles, and oxygen bottles. When storing compressed gas bottles, it is important to protect them from mechanical damage. Should the valve stem be broken or the cylinder fail, the bottle could act like a missal. The valve should have a cap to protect the valve stem, be stored upright and be chained to prevent falling. It is also important to keep these materials in cool areas away from sources of heat. Heating these containers can cause pressure to build up resulting in explosion.

    8. August 2009 8 CLASS B: FLAMMABLE & COMBUSTIBLE There is only a slight difference between flammable and combustible materials. An example of a flammable liquids could be gasoline. A combustible liquid would be diesel fuel. The symbol is a circle with a flame. All WHMIS symbols are enclosed by a circle. There is only a slight difference between flammable and combustible materials. An example of a flammable liquids could be gasoline. A combustible liquid would be diesel fuel. The symbol is a circle with a flame. All WHMIS symbols are enclosed by a circle.

    9. August 2009 9 CLASS B: FLAMMABLE & COMBUSTIBLE With flammable and combustible materials, there are two dangers present: the potential danger of fire and the resulting smoke. Flammable materials should only be used in a well ventilated area away from incompatible materials and sources of ignition. If the material is also heavier than air, vapours can be generated that pool and flow along the ground like a fluid. These can travel surprising distances, find a source of ignition and flash back causing a fire at the source of the materials. Some of these materials can develop and hold a static charge when poured. If the static results in a spark, an explosive fire can result. This is what happened to an 18 year old young man on his first day on the job. He died several days later from severe burns to most of his body. Imagine as a parent, not being able to touch your child as he lay dying in agony. This accident did not need to happen, if the container he was pouring from had been grounded and bonded to the container he was pouring it into. With flammable and combustible materials, there are two dangers present: the potential danger of fire and the resulting smoke. Flammable materials should only be used in a well ventilated area away from incompatible materials and sources of ignition. If the material is also heavier than air, vapours can be generated that pool and flow along the ground like a fluid. These can travel surprising distances, find a source of ignition and flash back causing a fire at the source of the materials. Some of these materials can develop and hold a static charge when poured. If the static results in a spark, an explosive fire can result. This is what happened to an 18 year old young man on his first day on the job. He died several days later from severe burns to most of his body. Imagine as a parent, not being able to touch your child as he lay dying in agony. This accident did not need to happen, if the container he was pouring from had been grounded and bonded to the container he was pouring it into.

    10. August 2009 10 CLASS B: FLAMMABLE & COMBUSTIBLE The use of candles in our schools as a symbol of our faith also needs to be monitored there are approved candles and those that are not. For information on which are approved, please contact the Religion Coordinator. It is also important to note that smoking is NOT permitted on Board property by Board policy and also by law. Violators can be fined. The use of candles in our schools as a symbol of our faith also needs to be monitored there are approved candles and those that are not. For information on which are approved, please contact the Religion Coordinator. It is also important to note that smoking is NOT permitted on Board property by Board policy and also by law. Violators can be fined.

    11. August 2009 11 CLASS C: OXIDIZING MATERIALS Oxidizing materials are symbolized with an O for oxygen with a flame halo. These materials cause oxygen to be released into a fire that can cause flammable and combustible materials to spontaneously ignite, hotter, faster and more aggressive fires or explosions. One example is chlorine bleach. Oxidizers should never be stored with flammable or combustible materials. Oxidizing materials are symbolized with an O for oxygen with a flame halo. These materials cause oxygen to be released into a fire that can cause flammable and combustible materials to spontaneously ignite, hotter, faster and more aggressive fires or explosions. One example is chlorine bleach. Oxidizers should never be stored with flammable or combustible materials.

    12. August 2009 12 CLASS D: POISONOUS & INFECTIOUS

    13. August 2009 13 CLASS D: POISONOUS & INFECTIOUS

    14. August 2009 14 CLASS D: POISONOUS & INFECTIOUS

    15. August 2009 15 CLASS D: POISONOUS & INFECTIOUS

    16. August 2009 16 CLASS D: POISONOUS & INFECTIOUS

    17. August 2009 17 CLASS E: CORROSIVE

    18. August 2009 18 CLASS F: DANGEROUSLY REACTIVE

    19. August 2009 19 LABELS SUPPLIER LABELS Product Identifier Supplier Identifier Statement referring to the MSDS Hazard Symbol(s) Risk Phrase Precautionary Measures First Aid Measures Should you require a workplace label, or have any difficulty interpreting information on a label, contact your supervisor. This is an example of a Supplier Label. You can see that it contains: The name of the product The address of the supplier The hazard symbols with the primary hazard on the left and secondary hazards to the right Risk phrases (e.g. Caution keep out of eyes corrosive) Precautionary measures (e.g. Use only with non-vented chemical splash goggles) First Aid Measures (e.g. In case of eye contact, flush with cool running water for 15 minutes and seek immediate medical attention) And a statement referring to a material safety data sheet. The Supplier label is also in both official languages. This is an example of a Supplier Label. You can see that it contains: The name of the product The address of the supplier The hazard symbols with the primary hazard on the left and secondary hazards to the right Risk phrases (e.g. Caution keep out of eyes corrosive) Precautionary measures (e.g. Use only with non-vented chemical splash goggles) First Aid Measures (e.g. In case of eye contact, flush with cool running water for 15 minutes and seek immediate medical attention) And a statement referring to a material safety data sheet. The Supplier label is also in both official languages.

    20. August 2009 20 LABELS - WORKPLACE Product Identifier Safe handling instructions Statement referring to the MSDS Should you require a workplace label, or have any difficulty interpreting information on a label, contact your supervisor. This is an example of a workplace label. There is less information on a workplace label, however, it is assumed that the original Supplier Label and MSDS have already been read and understood. Required on the Workplace Label is: Product identifier Safe handling instructions and Statement referring to a msds The safe handling instructions in this example are handled in two way first there is the HMIS hazard ranking system that ranks a material according to flammability, toxicity and reactivity on a scale of 0 (no hazard) to 4 (severe hazard). Where you see a 2, 3, or 4 refer to the msds. The second method is a list of ppe and a check box if the particular equipment is required. This is an example of a workplace label. There is less information on a workplace label, however, it is assumed that the original Supplier Label and MSDS have already been read and understood. Required on the Workplace Label is: Product identifier Safe handling instructions and Statement referring to a msds The safe handling instructions in this example are handled in two way first there is the HMIS hazard ranking system that ranks a material according to flammability, toxicity and reactivity on a scale of 0 (no hazard) to 4 (severe hazard). Where you see a 2, 3, or 4 refer to the msds. The second method is a list of ppe and a check box if the particular equipment is required.

    21. August 2009 21 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET MSDS must be updated every 3 years. Read the MSDS BEFORE using a for the first time or when using a new product. MSDS binders are located in the staff room of each school, and every custodian has a copy. If assigned to a new school, ask your supervisor to show you where this binder is located. Should you notice that an MSDS is missing or is outdated report this to you supervisor immediately. The Material Safety Data Sheet is the source of all health and safety information for controlled products. Every department or individual that brings a WHMIS-controlled product into our facilities is responsible to acquire a current msds and as long as that product remains in the facility, to maintain an updated msds every three years from the date the msds was prepared. You should always read and be familiar with the msds for every controlled-product you handle. The Material Safety Data Sheet is the source of all health and safety information for controlled products. Every department or individual that brings a WHMIS-controlled product into our facilities is responsible to acquire a current msds and as long as that product remains in the facility, to maintain an updated msds every three years from the date the msds was prepared. You should always read and be familiar with the msds for every controlled-product you handle.

    22. August 2009 22 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET In each section there is specific information. The Product Identifier section also contains the emergency (24/7) contact number. The Hazardous Ingredients section also contains the occupational exposure limits for the hazardous ingredients these are the concentrations to which a worker can be exposed to safely. The Health Hazard or Toxicological Properties section contains specific information on the potential health effects and also the symptoms of overexposure. The First Aid section contains emergency measure that should be followed in the event of accidental exposure. In each section there is specific information. The Product Identifier section also contains the emergency (24/7) contact number. The Hazardous Ingredients section also contains the occupational exposure limits for the hazardous ingredients these are the concentrations to which a worker can be exposed to safely. The Health Hazard or Toxicological Properties section contains specific information on the potential health effects and also the symptoms of overexposure. The First Aid section contains emergency measure that should be followed in the event of accidental exposure.

    23. August 2009 23 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET The Physical Data section provides detailed information of the physical properties of the material such as colour, odour, vapour pressure, density, boiling point and the like. The Fire/Explosion section contains information on the flammability of the material and the means to extinguish a fire. The Reactivity section outlines the conditions under which the material may become unstable and any incompatible materials. The Safe Handling Measures section outlines any precautions that should be taken when handling, using or storing the material including personal protective equipment required. The Preparation section indicates who prepared the MSDS and when. There may also be a technical contact number. The Physical Data section provides detailed information of the physical properties of the material such as colour, odour, vapour pressure, density, boiling point and the like. The Fire/Explosion section contains information on the flammability of the material and the means to extinguish a fire. The Reactivity section outlines the conditions under which the material may become unstable and any incompatible materials. The Safe Handling Measures section outlines any precautions that should be taken when handling, using or storing the material including personal protective equipment required. The Preparation section indicates who prepared the MSDS and when. There may also be a technical contact number.

    24. August 2009 24 ROUTES OF ENTRY Exposure occurs when the toxic substance either comes in CONTACT with and/or ENTERS the body. Exposure occurs through the following 4 ROUTES OF ENTRY. Inhalation, Absorption (Skin or eyes), Ingestion, Injection So the first question is how can I be exposed? Exposure occurs when we come into contact with a hazardous material and that material enters the body to cause harm. The ways that a chemical can enter the body are referred to as routes of entry. These are: inhalation, skin contact, skin absorption, eye contact, and ingestion. So the first question is how can I be exposed? Exposure occurs when we come into contact with a hazardous material and that material enters the body to cause harm. The ways that a chemical can enter the body are referred to as routes of entry. These are: inhalation, skin contact, skin absorption, eye contact, and ingestion.

    25. August 2009 25 REMEMBER Before using a new product, always read the label and material safety data sheet! Ensure you know how to use, wear and care for any personal protective equipment provided to you. Read and follow the instructions! It is imperative that you are aware of how you need to use the product, what it might do to you so you can take appropriate precautions, how you might know if you were being overexposed and what to do if you had an accidental exposure. It is imperative that you are aware of how you need to use the product, what it might do to you so you can take appropriate precautions, how you might know if you were being overexposed and what to do if you had an accidental exposure.

    26. August 2009 26 CONCLUSION Remember the person most responsible for your health and safety is you! If you have any questions, speak to your Supervisor, for additional information call: Mary Anne Moser, CRSP, CHSC, RPN, C.OHS Occupational Health and Safety Officer (519) 663-2088 ext. 43413 m.moser@ldcsb.on.ca