The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Leo
the beginnings of our global age europe and the americas n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas

play fullscreen
1 / 22
Download Presentation
The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas
486 Views
Download Presentation

The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Witness History Audio: Mocteczuma Hears Strange News First Encounters in the Americas Columbus arrived in the West Indies and claimed them for Spain. The Taíno people who lived there were made to mine gold for the Europeans. Conquistadors used their guns and horses to control the Native Americans who outnumbered them. Native American populations quickly shrank, however, with the deaths due to diseases for which they had no immunity. Section 1: Conquest in the Americas Witness History Audio: Audio Maya Book Color Transparency 93: Xochimilico Note Taking Transparency 110 1 of 9

  2. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Cortés Conquers Mexico From the Caribbean, Hernán Cortés took an expedition to Aztec lands in Mexico. With the help of some of the Aztec’s conquered peoples, he seized the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán twice (the second time, only after smallpox had weakened the Aztecs). Section 1: Conquest in the Americas Pizarro Takes Peru Francisco Pizarro killed the Inca leader Atahaulpa and thousands of other Incas. He took control of Native American lands in Peru, Ecuador, and Chile, and established the city of Lima. 2 of 9

  3. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Effects of the Spanish Conquistadors The Spanish built an empire in the Americas, which was financed by the gold and silver they seized. Native Americans died from diseases they didn’t’ understand and some converted to Christianity, while others continued to resist the Spanish. Section 1: Conquest in the Americas Color Transparency 90: Inca Shirt Color Transparency 89: The Americas QuickTake Section Quiz Progress Monitoring Transparency 3 of 9

  4. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 1 Note Taking Transparency 110 5 of 9

  5. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Witness History Audio: A Missionary Protests Ruling the Spanish Empire • The Spanish king appointed viceroys to rule its American provinces, with a Council of the Indies setting rules and monitoring activities. • Catholic missionaries worked to convert Native Americans and set up mission churches. The colonies could only trade with Spain. • Conquistadors were given encomiendas, which allowed them to force Native Americans to work in mines and on plantations. Some priests condemned the system. When Native Americans began to die from terrible conditions, Africans were brought in to replace them. Section 2: Spanish and Portuguese Colonies in the Americas Note Taking Transparency 111A 1 of 5

  6. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Colonial Society and Culture Indian, African, and Spanish cultures blended. Colonial societies were split into social classes with the native Spanish at the top. Towns and cities grew and universities arose. Beyond the Spanish Empire Portuguese nobles were granted land in Brazil on which to build plantations, towns, and churches. Brazilwood was the first major export. Smugglers from other European countries traded illegally with the colonists, and pirates seized Spanish and Portuguese shipments. Section 2: Spanish and Portuguese Colonies in the Americas Note Taking Transparency 111AB QuickTake Section Quiz Progress Monitoring Transparency 2 of 5

  7. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 2 Note Taking Transparency 111A 3 of 5

  8. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 2 Note Taking Transparency 111B 4 of 5

  9. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Witness History Audio: A Piece of the Past Building New France • The French began exploring the coast of Canada as they fished for Cod. In 1534, Jacques Cartier arrived and soon discovered the St. Lawrence River. He claimed much of eastern Canada for France. • Missionaries and Fur traders traveled inland and down the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. In 1608, the first permanent French settlement was established at Quebec. Section 3: Struggle for North America Color Transparency 91: Colonies In the Americas Note Taking Transparency 112 1 of 6

  10. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas The 13 English Colonies • John Cabot claimed Newfoundland for England in 1497. The English established colonies along the eastern coast of the present-day United States. • The first colony at Jamestown, Virginia, struggled until the settlers began to grow and export tobacco. In Plymouth, Massachusetts, Pilgrims set up a colony in which to practice their religion freely. • In the 1600s and 1700s, England established 13 colonies, which were overseen by royal governors. However, each colony had its own elected representative assembly and they were largely self-governed. Section 3: Struggle for North America 2 of 6

  11. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Struggling for Power • By the late 1600s, Spain, France, England, the Netherlands competed for control of North American lands. • Native Americans joined different sides of the struggle. • The disagreements between Britain and France came to war in North America in 1754. This French and Indian War ended with the British gaining Canada and French lands east of the Mississippi. Section 3: Struggle for North America Geography Interactive: Land Claims in the Americas, About 1700 QuickTake Section Quiz Progress Monitoring Transparency 3 of 6

  12. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 3 Color Transparency 91: Colonies in the Americas 4 of 6

  13. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 3 Note Taking Transparency 112 5 of 6

  14. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Witness History Audio: Forced into Slavery Triangular Trade Across the Atlantic • In triangular trade, ships from Europe brought manufactured goods and cash to Africa. Then African slaves were taken to the Americas in the Middle Passage. • The slaves were exchanged for sugar, molasses, cotton, or other colonial goods such as furs or salt fish. • European merchants involved in the triangular trade grew rich, and wealthy port cities emerged in Europe and the Americas. Section 4: The Atlantic Slave Trade Witness History Video: The Atlantic Slave Trade Note Taking Transparency 113 1 of 5

  15. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Horrors of the Middle Passage • Africans captured in inland villages were forced to march to the coast, where they waited in holding pens for the slave ships to arrive. • During the Middle Passage the Africans were crammed below the decks for weeks or months. • Many died of disease or brutality. Section 4: The Atlantic Slave Trade History Interactive: The Middle Passage: A Forced Journey 2 of 5

  16. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Impact of the Atlantic Slave Trade • African states and societies were devastated by the slave trade. An estimated 11 million Africans worked as slaves in the Americas, while perhaps around 2 million died during the Middle Passage. Section 4: The Atlantic Slave Trade QuickTake Section Quiz Progress Monitoring Transparency 3 of 5

  17. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 4 Note Taking Transparency 113 4 of 5

  18. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Witness History Audio: Uniting the World The Columbian Exchange • The exchange of food, animals, and ideas that began with Columbus’s voyage to the Americas greatly affected the peoples of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. • Europeans and Asians benefited from plants that were easy to grow and store such as the potato. Populations in Europe and Asia grew with the introduction of new foods. • Horses brought by Europeans benefited the nomadic peoples of North America. • Diseases were also exchanged and caused massive deaths. Section 5: Effects of Global Contact Note Taking Transparency 114A Color Transparency 94: Navajo Pictographs 1 of 8

  19. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas A Commercial Revolution • With the increasing profits from the American colonies, more money was available in Europe, which caused inflation. • Capitalism grew with the success of the overseas colonies, and new business methods, such as joint stock companies, emerged. • Manufacturers avoided the powerful guilds with the use of the “putting-out” system. Section 5: Effects of Global Contact Note Taking Transparency 114B 2 of 8

  20. The Beginnings of Our Global Age:Europe and the Americas Mercantilism Arises • Mercantilist nations wanted to export more than they imported. • They strictly regulated trade with their colonies, which were not allowed to trade with other countries. • Governments also imposed tariffs on imported goods. Section 5: Effects of Global Contact Progress Monitoring Transparency Color Transparency 92: Poking Fun at European Aristocrats QuickTake Section Quiz QuickTake Chapter Test 3 of 8

  21. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 5 Note Taking Transparency 114A 5 of 8

  22. The Beginnings of Our Global Age: Europe and the Americas: Section 5 Note Taking Transparency 114B 6 of 8