course overview cs 510 software management and economics l.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Course Overview CS 510 Software Management and Economics

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 25

Course Overview CS 510 Software Management and Economics - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 257 Views
  • Uploaded on

Course Overview CS 510 Software Management and Economics. Fall 2005 Barry Boehm, USC. Outline. Course objective Help you learn to be a successful software manager For a career lasting through the 2040’s. Software management learning objectives

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Course Overview CS 510 Software Management and Economics' - Leo


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
outline
Outline
  • Course objective
    • Help you learn to be a successful software manager
    • For a career lasting through the 2040’s.
  • Software management learning objectives
    • What does a successful SW manager need to deal with?
  • What does a successful (software) manager need to do?
    • Enterprise Success Theorem
    • Enterprise Success Realization Theorem
  • Overview of VBSE Theory
    • Value-Based Software Engineering
  • Overview of Course
    • Programmatics, schedule, academic integrity
  • This Week’s Assignment

©USC-CSE

what do sw managers need to deal with
What Do SW Managers Need to Deal With?
  • People: customers, users, architects, designers, programmers, testers, lawyers, venture capitalists, suppliers, politicians, …
  • Products: requirements, designs, code, documentation, plans, tools, data, facilities, equipment, …
  • Projects: proposals, presentations, contracts, deliverables, budgets, schedules, milestones, …
  • Resources: time, money, space, communications, skills, …
  • Technology: software, hardware, domain technology, COTS, OSS, …
  • Organizations and Cultures: top management, marketing, sales, development, finance, customer/user organizations, …
  • Changes in all of the above

©USC-CSE

software management guidelines
Software Management Guidelines
  • Eclectic combinations of advice
  • Management frameworks
  • Maturity models
  • People management theories: X, Y, Z
  • Enterprise Success Theorem: Theory W
  • Enterprise Success Realization Theorem

©USC-CSE

sorting out software advice
Sorting out software advice

Build

It

twice

Thorough test planning

Do it top-down

Prove

everything

correct

Use disciplined reviews

Do it

outside-in

Programming

standards

Automated

aids

Independent test teams

Use walk-throughs

Chief

Programmer

teams

Measurable milestones

Early requirements baseline

Program Library

Involve

the user

Structured

Programming

Design verification

Configuration management

Project work authorizations

End-item acceptance plan

Unit development folders

©USC-CSE

koontz o donnell management framework

Planning

Directing

Organizing

Staffing

Controlling

Koontz-O’Donnell Management Framework
  • Purpose
  • Unity of goals
  • Cost-
  • effectiveness
  • Span of
  • Management
  • Purpose
  • Contribution to
  • goals
  • Commitment
  • Verifiability
  • Cost-Effectiveness
  • Precedence
  • Purpose
  • Contribution to
  • goals
  • Purpose
  • Harmony of goals
  • Purpose
  • Assurance of goals
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Control responsibility
  • Motivation
  • Understanding of
  • goals
  • Reflection of goals
  • Selection
  • Top talent
  • Job matching
  • Career progression
  • Skills balance
  • Teamwork
  • Structure
  • Reflection of plans
  • Organizational
  • suitability
  • individuality
  • Delegation of
  • Authority
  • Unity of command
  • Parity of authority
    • Responsibility
  • Authority level
  • Absoluteness of
  • responsibility
  • Communication
  • Parity of information
    • Responsibility
  • Receptiveness
  • Integrity
  • Structure
  • Premises
  • WWWWWHHW
  • Synchronization
  • Recruiting
  • Reward
  • Openness
  • Commitment
  • Process
  • Standards
  • Critical-point
  • Exception
  • Flexibility
  • Timeliness
  • Action
  • Leadership
  • Identification
  • Empathy
  • Sustained initiative
  • Integrity
  • Team building
  • Management of time
  • Process
  • Limiting Factor
  • Flexibility
  • Navigational change
  • Performer
  • Participation
  • Division of Work
  • Form follows function
    • People’s strengths
  • Functional definition
  • Separation
  • Retention
  • Reinforcement
  • Team building
  • Phase out
  • Backup

©USC-CSE

cmmi process areas staged representation
CMMI Process AreasStaged Representation

Level 5

Optimizing

Causal Analysis and Resolution

Organizational Innovation & Deployment

Quantitative Project Management

Organizational Process Performance

Level 4

Quantitatively Managed

Organizational Process Focus

Organizational Process Definition

Organizational Training

Integrated Project Management

Risk Management

Decision Analysis and Resolution

Requirements Development

Technical Solution

Product Integration

Verification

Validation

Level 3Defined

  • Integrated Teaming
  • Organizational Environment
  • for Integration

Project Planning

Project Monitoring and Control

Configuration Management

Process & Product Quality Assurance

Supplier Agreement Management

Measurement and Analysis

Requirements Management

Level 2

Managed

Level 1Performed

©USC-CSE

theory x and theory y
Theory X and Theory Y*
  • Theory X
    • People inherently dislike work
    • They have to be coerced into working
    • The prefer being told what to do
  • Theory Y
    • People don’t inherently dislike work
    • People can exercise self-direction
    • Commitment to objectives depends on resulting rewards
    • People can learn to seek responsibility
    • Work creativity is widely distributed
    • People’s potential is only partially utilized

* D. McGregor, The Human Side of Enterprise, 1960.

©USC-CSE

theory z japanese style management
Theory Z: Japanese-Style Management
  • People work best toward goals which they have helped establish
  • Once people have bought into goals, you can trust them to perform
  • If people share a common set of values, they can develop workable project goals

©USC-CSE

theory w enterprise success theorem and informal proof
Theory W: Enterprise Success Theorem– And informal proof

Theorem: Your enterprise will succeed if and only if it makes winners of your success-critical stakeholders

  • Proof of “if”: Everyone that counts is a winner. Nobody significant is left to complain.
  • Proof of “only if”:

Nobody wants to lose.Prospective losers will refuse to participate, or will counterattack.The usual result is lose-lose.

©USC-CSE

win lose generally becomes lose lose
Win-lose Generally Becomes Lose-lose

Actually, nobody wins in these situations

©USC-CSE

enterprise success realization theorem
Enterprise Success Realization Theorem

Theorem: Your enterprise can realize

success if and only if

  • You identify and involve all of the success critical stakeholders (SCSHs)
    • Dependency theory
  • You determine how the SCSHs want to win
    • Utility theory
  • You help the SCSHs determine and commit to a win-win course of action and solution
    • Decision theory
  • You adaptively control the course of action to continue to realize a win-win solution
    • Control theory

©USC-CSE

vbse component theories
VBSE Component Theories
  • Theory W (Stakeholder win-win)
    • Enterprise Success Theorem, Win-Win Achievement Theorem
  • Dependency Theory (Product, process, people interdependencies)
    • Systems architecture/performance theory, costing and scheduling theory; organization theory
  • Utility Theory
    • Utility functions, bounded rationality, Maslow need hierarchy, multi-attribute utility theory
  • Decision Theory
    • Statistical decision theory, game theory, negotiation theory, theory of Justice
  • Control Theory
    • Observability, predictability, controllability, stability theory

©USC-CSE

initial vbse theory 4 1 process with a great deal of concurrency and backtracking
Initial VBSE Theory: 4+1 Process– With a great deal of concurrency and backtracking

©USC-CSE

outline18
Outline
  • Course objective
    • Help you learn to be a successful software manager
    • For a career lasting through the 2040’s.
  • Software management learning objectives
    • What does a successful SW manager need to deal with?
  • What does a successful (software) manager need to do?
    • Enterprise Success Theorem
    • Enterprise Success Realization Theorem
  • Overview of VBSE Theory
    • Value-Based Software Engineering
  • Overview of Course
    • Programmatics, schedule, academic integrity
  • This Week’s Assignment

©USC-CSE

comparison of cs 510 and cs 577a
Comparison of CS 510 and CS 577a

CS 510

CS 577a

  • VBSE Theory, Practice
  • S/W - System
  • Architecting
  • Operational Concept &
  • Rqts. Definition
    • WinWin System
    • Prototyping
  • OO Analysis & Design
    • Rational Rose
  • Team Project
  • (DEN: IV&V)
  • COCOMO II Extensions
  • Microeconomics
    • Decision Theory
  • Agile and Rapid
  • Development
  • People Management
  • 2 Midterms, Final
  • VBSE Framework
  • MBASE
  • WinWin Spiral
    • Risk Management
  • Planning & Control
    • COCOMO II
  • Business Case Analysis

©USC-CSE

cs 510 course schedule overview
CS 510 Course Schedule Overview
  • Aug 22 - Sept 21 VBSE, Agility and Discipline, People Management, COCOMO II
  • Sept 23 Midterm Exam I
  • Sept 26 - Oct 4 Software Microeconomics, Risk and Business Case Analysis
  • Oct 26 Midterm Exam II
  • Oct 28 – Nov 30 COTS Integration, Planning & Control, Maturity Models, Case Studies
  • Nov 21, Dec 5 CTO Analyses
  • Dec 7 Final Exam

©USC-CSE

cs 510 programmatics i
CS 510 Programmatics - I

Basis of grade. Final Exam, 30%; 2 midterms: 20%; Homework exercises: 50%.

  • Texts. Boehm et al., Software Cost Estimation with COCOMO II, Prentice Hall, 2000; Reifer, Business Case Analysis, Addison Wesley, 2001; Boehm and Turner, Balancing Agility and Discipline, Addison Wesley, 2004.
  • Instructor. Prof. Barry Boehm, SAL 328, (213) 740-8163, Fax (213) 740-4927; boehm@sunset.usc.edu
  • Office Hours. Monday and Wednesday, 10:00 - 12:00 or by appointment
  • Teaching Assistant. Yue Chen, yuec@sunset.usc.edu; Dan Wu, danwu@usc.edu
  • TA Office Hours. Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 – 4:30 pm. or by appointment
  • Web page: http://sunset.usc.edu/classes/cs510_2005

©USC-CSE

cs 510 questionnaire and acknowledgement
CS 510 Questionnaire and Acknowledgement

Please fill out and return.

Name: _________________________________________________

Student ID #: ___________________________________________

Dept./Degree Program: __________________________________

Job, Employer: _________________________________________

Software Work Experience (years): _______________________

Phone, fax numbers: ____________________________________

E-mail Address: ________________________________________

  • Acknowledgement: I acknowledge the importance of USC's academic integrity standards (with respect to plagiarism, referencing others' work, etc.), and agree to abide by them.

Signature: ______________________________________________

©USC-CSE

academic integrity acknowledgement
Academic Integrity Acknowledgement
  • Single most-serious offense: Plagiarism
    • Using other people’s work without crediting them
    • Homework, exams, class exercises, individual assignments
  • Minor first offense: You lose one grade level
    • E.g., B+ instead of A-
  • Major first offense of second offense: F for the course

©USC-CSE

slide24
We are Serious About Plagiarism
  • And experienced in finding it

©USC-CSE

first week s assignment
First Week’s Assignment
  • Today: Sign and turn in questionnaire and acknowledgement
  • Mon-Fri: Watch/listen to Wed, Fri VBSE lectures
  • Read VBSE papers (EP 1-4)
  • Submit 1 question each on EP-1, 2 and 3 content
    • Grading criteria: relevance, thoughtfulness
    • 5 points per question

©USC-CSE