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The Realities of Hurricanes . Robert D Macedo Director of Operations of the VoIP Hurricane Net ARES SKYWARN Coordinator for NWS Taunton Eastern Massachusetts ARES Section Emergency Coordinator Web: www.voipwx.net Email: [email protected]

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the realities of hurricanes

The Realities of Hurricanes

Robert D Macedo

Director of Operations of the VoIP Hurricane Net

ARES SKYWARN Coordinator for NWS Taunton

Eastern Massachusetts ARES Section Emergency Coordinator

Web: www.voipwx.net

Email: [email protected]

Slides provided and heavily leveraged from NWS Taunton Massachusetts Realities of New England Hurricanes Power Point Presentation. Special thanks to KB1GHX-Glenn Field, NWS Taunton Warning Coordination Meteorologist for providing this presentation.

slide2
Nature's Awesome Power!

Hurricane Isabel – September 2003

objectives
Objectives
  • What makes an active hurricane season?
  • What are the primary weather hazards we need to be prepared for?
hurricane preparedness

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

Before a storm threatens

When a storm threatens

Weather information sources

Clues to an increasing threat

Concluding thoughts

hurricane preparedness before a hurricane threatens
HURRICANE PREPAREDNESSBEFORE A HURRICANE THREATENS
  • Have a storm preparedness plan (boat owners and home owners)
  • Means to know if a storm threatens
  • Know policies/procedures of where boat is moored
  • Know options:
    • Haul boat out of water?
    • Secure in place?
    • Move to safer anchorage and secure?
  • Do you need to evacuate home?
    • Where would you go?
    • How much time to get there?
    • If going to a shelter, pet arrangements?
  • Ready access to insurance policies for boat and home
    • Know coverage limits and have pictures of boat
    • Know how to reach claim agents
pre season boater checklist
PRE SEASON BOATER CHECKLIST
  • Check key phone numbers (marina, insurance agent, etc.)
  • Coordinated your storm preparedness plan with caretaker/marina
  • Batteries fully charged
  • Cleats checked
  • Chafe gear stored/labeled
  • Sufficient line
  • Suitable anchors
  • Bilge pumps, if applicable
  • Hatches water tight
  • Moorings
    • Inspected
    • Adequate for potential

storm surge, wind and waves

Hurricane Bob (August 19, 1991)

preparedness for the coastal homeowner
PREPAREDNESS FOR THE COASTAL HOMEOWNER

Find out if you are in a potential evacuation zone or not

If might have to evacuate, know where to go and how to get there

Have shutters or plywood on hand, if may need to protect windows

Know electrical, water, gas shut off valves

Review working condition of emergency equipment – including flashlights and battery powered radios

Have cache of non-perishable food and water

coastal home preparedness
COASTAL HOME PREPAREDNESS

Board up windows if sustained wind speeds may reach 60 mph or greater

  • Use storm shutters or plywood
  • Install correctly to avoid these items becoming missiles
  • Do not tape windows
when constructing on the coast
WHEN CONSTRUCTING ON THE COAST

Hurricane clips

Hurricane straps

when a hurricane threatens
Monitor weather developments

Put your plan into action

Allow time buffer – remember major New England hurricanes accelerate and may arrive hours sooner than forecasted

WHEN A HURRICANE THREATENS
boat may not be only item you need to move
Boat may not be only item you need to move!

When hurricane threatens, remember also to:

  • Secure potentially dangerous items such as propane tanks
  • Collect/store loose objects such as lawn furniture, trash cans, etc.
  • Board up windows and doors if exposed to high winds (5/8” thick plywood)
other preparedness actions when hurricane threatens
OTHER PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS WHEN HURRICANE THREATENS
  • Check supply of batteries
    • Never use candles
  • Check supply of nonperishable food and water
  • Fill-up with gas and money
    • Gas pumps and ATMs rely on power
    • Check medical prescriptions
  • Make sure you don’t need to evacuate
  • Turn refrigerator to coldest setting
  • Help your neighbors
    • Including owners of boats surrounding yours
    • One bad mooring can mean disaster for many
and help your neighbors
AND HELP YOUR NEIGHBORS
  • On land and sea
  • For boat owners, one bad mooring can mean disaster for many
national weather service working as a team
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICEWORKING AS A TEAM
  • Tropical Prediction Center
    • Coordinates with local Weather Forecast Offices
    • Coordinates with emergency managers and media on national level
    • Issues official forecast track
  • Local Weather Forecast Offices Across the US
    • Coordinates with emergency managers and media in their County Warning Area.
    • Focuses on threats at the local/regional level.
slide24
Tropical Prediction Center meteorologists are the “specialists”

Weather Forecast Office meteorologists are the “general practitioners”

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
weather information sources
WEATHER INFORMATION SOURCES
  • Internet
    • www.weather.gov
    • Click on area on map that you live in for information from your local office.
  • NOAA Weather Radio
  • Coast Guard transmissions
  • Commercial sources
tropical cyclone definitions
TROPICAL CYCLONE DEFINITIONS
  • TROPICAL DEPRESSION – Organized system with maximum sustained winds less than 34 knots (39 mph)
  • TROPICAL STORM – Well defined circulation with maximum sustained winds 34 – 63 knots (39 to 73 mph)
  • HURRICANE – Sustained winds of 64 knots (74 mph) or higher
hurricane categories saffir simpson scale
HURRICANE CATEGORIESSaffir-Simpson Scale
  • Category 1 – sustained winds 74 to 95 mph
    • Edouard in 1996 (Labor Day Weekend)
    • Gloria in 1985
  • Category 2 – sustained winds 96 to 110 mph
    • Bob in August 1991
  • Category 3 – sustained winds 111 to 130 mph
    • 1938 Hurricane, 1944 Hurricane, Carol (1954), Edna (1954)
  • Category 4 – sustained winds 131 to 155 mph
    • Hugo (1989)
  • Category 5 – sustained winds > 155 mph
    • 1935 Keys Hurricane, Camille (1969), Andrew (1992)
do not even think about staying with your boat during a tropical storm or hurricane
Do not even think about staying with your boat during a tropical storm or hurricane

…unless you own a very large vessel and plan to put out to sea

concluding thoughts
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS

History gives us a clue to what can happen, but our experience can be misleading

future presentations
Future Presentations
  • For the March VoIP Hurricane Net Presentation, we will focus on reporting criteria and information that we’d like to pass on the net and the net’s role in supporting the National Hurricane Center Amateur Radio Station WX4NHC.
  • For the April VoIP Hurricane Net, we will review the National Hurricane Conference and the net’s involvement in that conference.
slide36
Thank you!

Rob Macedo (KD1CY)

Web: www.voipwx.net

Email: [email protected]

Director of Operations of the VoIP Hurricane Net

ARES SKYWARN Coordinator for NWS Taunton

Eastern Massachusetts ARES Section Emergency Coordinator

Hurricane Isabel – September 2003

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