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AI – Week 10 AI and Games (2). Lee McCluskey, room 2/09 Email [email protected] http://scom.hud.ac.uk/scomtlm/cha2555/. Last Week. Introduction to AI Games 2- player games Minimax and alpha beta pruning. AI in Games: practical example.

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ai week 10 ai and games 2

AI – Week 10AI and Games (2)

Lee McCluskey, room 2/09

Email [email protected]

http://scom.hud.ac.uk/scomtlm/cha2555/

last week
Last Week

Introduction to AI Games

2- player games

Minimax and alpha beta pruning

ai in games practical example
AI in Games: practical example

This week and next week we will implement a 2-player board game in Prolog.

  • Board (state) representation
  • Board (state) evaluation
  • Move application
  • Move generation
  • Mini-max / alpha beta algorithm

Same Code in Prolog

fox and goose
Fox and Goose

fox

Goal: Goose in column 4

HOME

Rules: If fox next to goose and foxes turn, then fox can eat goose

Fox/goose can move diagonal as well as vert/horiz. Only ONE fox can move each turn.

goose

fox

fox and goose5
Fox and Goose

fox

Goal: Goose in column 4

HOME

Rules: If fox next to goose and foxes turn, then fox can eat goose

Fox/goose can move diagonal as well as vert/horiz

goose

fox

GOOSE to move – which

MOVE??????

fox and goose6
Fox and Goose

fox

Goal: Goose in column 4

HOME

Rules: If fox next to goose and foxes turn, then fox can eat goose

Fox/goose can move diagonal as well as vert/horiz

goose

fox

FOX to move – which

MOVE??????

fox and goose more elaborate game
Fox and Goose – more elaborate game..

Goal: Goose in last column

Rules: If fox next to goose and foxes turn, then fox can eat goose

Fox/goose can move diagonal as well as vert/horiz

New rules:

-Fox can’t move to last column

-Obstacles to reduce movement

fox

HOME

fox

goose

board state representation
Board (state) Representation

There are MANY ways to represent the state of a game eg

b(1,[ 0 , 0, f, 0 ],       [ 0 , 0, 0, 0 ],       [ 0 , 0, 0, 0 ],       [ g , 0, 0, 0 ],       [ 0 , 0, 0, 0 ],       [ 0 , 0, f, 0 ]).

better representation
Better Representation

b(1, [

x(1,1,0), x(1,2,0), x(1,3,f), x(1,4,0),

x(2,1,0), x(2,2,0), x(2,3,0), x(2,4,0),

x(3,1,0), x(3,2,0), x(3,3,0), x(3,4,0),

x(4,1,g), x(4,2,0), x(4,3,0), x(4,4,0),

x(5,1,0), x(5,2,0), x(5,3,0), x(5,4,0),

x(6,1,0), x(6,2,0), x(6,3,f), x(6,4,0)]).

ORDER OF ELEMENT IN LIST IS IRRELEVANT

representation and simple evaluation
Representation and Simple Evaluation

b(1, [

x(1,1,0), x(1,2,0), x(1,3,f), x(1,4,0),

x(2,1,0), x(2,2,0), x(2,3,0), x(2,4,0),

x(3,1,0), x(3,2,0), x(3,3,0), x(3,4,0),

x(4,1,g), x(4,2,0), x(4,3,0), x(4,4,0),

x(5,1,0), x(5,2,0), x(5,3,0), x(5,4,0),

x(6,1,0), x(6,2,0), x(6,3,f), x(6,4,0)]).

/* SIMPLE EVALUATION –

Positive for Goose, Negative for Fox */

board_eval(L, 10000) :- member(x(_,4,g), L),!.

board_eval(L, -10000) :- \+ member(x(_,_,g), L),!.

board_eval(L, 0 ) :- !.

move application and generation
Move Application AND Generation

apply( FROM, TO, BOARD_IN, BOARD_OUT)

Move Generation:

Precondition: FROM and BOARD_IN are instantiated.

Postcondition: TO and BOARD_OUT get values.

Move Application:

Precondition: FROM, TO, and BOARD_IN are instantiated.

Postcondition: BOARD_OUT gets a value.

move application and generation12
Move Application AND Generation

Fixes parameters

% Assume Z is either f or g

apply( x(X,Y,Z), x(X1,Y1,Z1), B_IN, B_OUT) :-

% move to empty square OR fox eats goose ..

(Z1 = 0 ; (Z=f, Z1=g)),

member(x(X,Y,Z), B_IN),

member(x(X1,Y1,Z1),B_IN),

% FOX can't go into the fourth column...

\+ (Z=f, Y1=4),

% two squares must be next to each other

next(X,Y,X1,Y1),

% checks over – now make the move

remove(x(X,Y,Z), B_IN, B1),

remove(x(X1,Y1,Z1), B1, B2),

B_OUT = [x(X1,Y1,Z),x(X,Y,0)|B2].

Generates

Generate and Test

Tests parameters

Deterministic procedures

– only one possible output

examples
Search depth

Identifier of the starting board

Examples

Who goes first

Initial call to minimax

Finds best move

| ?- t(7,5,goose).

Move goose from 4,1 to 5,1

Estimated value of Board is -5

unclear who wins

Number of leaf boards evaluated is 43979

Move fox from 3,3 to 4,2

Move goose from 5,1 to 6,1

Move fox from 4,2 to 5,1

Move goose from 6,1 to 7,2

Move fox from 5,1 to 6,1

Move goose from 7,2 to 7,3

yes

- not enough search space to see who wins so fox chases goose

Subsequent calls to Minimax

from “finish_game” procedure

examples14
Examples

| ?- t(8,5,goose).

Move goose from 4,1 to 5,1

Estimated value of Board is 10000

goose wins

Number of leaf boards evaluated is 222714

Move fox from 3,3 to 2,2

Move goose from 5,1 to 4,2

Move fox from 2,2 to 3,3

Move goose from 4,2 to 5,3

Move fox from 3,3 to 4,2

Move goose from 5,3 to 4,4

Move fox from 4,2 to 5,3

yes

| ?-

  • This time enough search space to see that the goose wins
  • Note the fox wanders about as it knows that no win is possible!
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