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  1. Design and Technology Food Technology The Technological And Applied Studies (TAS) Faculty Stage 6 Subjects Exploring Early Childhood Textiles and Design Industrial Technology Metal and Engineering Technologies VET Hospitality Industry Curriculum Framework Industrial Technology Timber Products and Furniture Technologies VET Construction Industry Curriculum Framework

  2. Design and Technology “It’s about looking at needs and solving problems. It’s more than making things, it’s the whole process of looking at what people want and creating different solutions – then making!” Year 12 Student at Kingswood High School Rationale From the earliest times, humans have interpreted, shaped and altered their environments in an attempt to improve the quality of their lives. In the process, technologies have evolved and been developed to the extent that, today, they have an impact on most aspects of our daily lives. Australia needs business, industry and community leaders who understand the nature of design and technology; who will foster and promote innovation and the creative use of technologies; and who appreciate how design and technological activity contribute to the lives of individuals and to cultures and environments. The issue of sustainable development is of concern to individuals, communities and governments as increasing evidence of the depletion of our natural resources through technological activity emerges. The study of Design and Technology Stage 6 develops conceptual understanding and enables students to creatively apply these to specific technological endeavours through design projects. It also seeks to develop students’ appreciation of the historical and cultural influences on design and the interrelationships of design, technology, society and the environment. Design and Technology has a unique focus on creativity, innovation and the successful implementation of innovative ideas. Students will investigate the importance of evaluation, the role of computer-based technologies, management, communication and collaborative design, as well as exploring current and emerging technologies. Through the completion of quality design projects, students are provided with the opportunity to develop specific production and manufacturing skills. Design and Technology is inclusive of the needs, interests and aspirations of all students. It provides opportunities for students to develop design projects in areas of individual interest, to discuss equity issues related to design, production and manufacturing in the Australian society and to consider careers in the fields of design and manufacturing. Students will be given the opportunity to explore and develop technologies and demonstrate insight into the future uses of technology. They will articulate arguments on issues and consequences including environmental and social impacts. They will develop skills that are transferable and which lead to lifelong learning.

  3. Course Costs Design and Technology students will be expected to pay $60 in course fees for the Preliminary course and $40 for the HSC course, to cover the cost of consumables. Students will be expected to purchase project materials where the school cannot provide them. Course Structure  Preliminary Course Structure The Preliminary course is 120 indicative hours and will involve a minimum of two design projects. The projects will develop skills and knowledge to be further developed in the HSC course. Each project will place emphasis on the development of different skills and knowledge in designing and producing. Students must participate in hands-on, practical activities to achieve the outcomes of this course. Class activities are designed to develop knowledge and skills in designing and producing. Design projects must involve the design, production and evaluation of a product, system or environment that includes evidence of design processes recorded in a design folio, which may be in a variety of different forms. HSC Course Structure The HSC course is 120 indicative hours and includes the development and realisation of the major design project, a case study of an innovation and other teaching and learning activities. The major design project involves students selecting and applying appropriate design, production and evaluation skills to a product, system or environment which satisfies an identified need or opportunity.

  4. Hsc Major Design Project (MDP)

  5. Exploring Early childhood “We’ve gone to preschools and kindergartens to help with young kids; they’re a lot of fun. I’ve learned heaps of things that will help me when I do my TAFE course in Child Studies next year. I want to own my own child care centre one day...” Year 12 Student from Kingswood High School Rationale Our society acknowledges childhood as a unique and intense period for growth, development and learning. When members of society are provided with knowledge about childhood development they will then be able to support and encourage this development when interacting with children. The Exploring Early Childhood course aims to achieve this by giving students an overview of development and related issues within an early childhood context. It provides the opportunity to consider a range of issues in relation to the individual student, their family and the community. As well as reflecting on the personal relevance of childhood issues, students are encouraged to consider the implications for future interactions with children, be these as a parent, friend, carer or educator. Children and childhood are examined from a multidisciplinary perspective and students have opportunities to link theory and practice. The approach taken in this syllabus views childhood learning as experiential, that is, children are active learners and learn and make sense of the world around them through their experiences and through their interactions with others. Throughout this subject the terms infant, toddler, and preschooler are used to refer to children in the approximate age ranges of birth to twelve months, one to three years, and three to five years respectively. Where children are referred to as being in the early years of school, the years from Kindergarten to Year 2, or age’s five to eight, are implied. Course Costs Exploring Early Childhood has many practical elements ranging from teaching preschools and kindergarten classes and making relevant resources to designing and producing baby food and writing a children’s book. Students are charged $30 per annum to cover the cost of consumables used throughout the course. Course Structure Exploring Early Childhood comprises a compulsory common core and optional modules. The core comprises 45 indicative hours of study. The optional modules expand on the issues introduced in the compulsory core component. Fourteen optional modules are included in this document.

  6. Industrial Technology Metal and Engineering Technologies Industrial Technology Stage 6 has a Preliminary course and an HSC course. The Preliminary course of 120 indicative hours consists of project work and an industry study that provide a broad range of skills and knowledge related to the focus area chosen and an introduction to processes, skills and practices relevant to the design, management, communication and construction of practical projects. The HSC course of 120 indicative hours consists of the development, management and communication of a major practical project and folio that contribute to the development of knowledge, skills and understanding related to the focus area of study. Students choose to study ONE of SIX focus areas. The same area is to be studied in both the Preliminary and HSC courses. The focus areas are: • Automotive Technologies • Electronics Technologies • Graphics Technologies • Metal and Engineering Technologies • Multimedia Technologies • Timber Products and Furniture Technologies. Both the Preliminary and HSC courses are organised around four sections: A. Industry Study B. Design, Management and Communication C. Production D. Industry Related Manufacturing Technology. Students will use the new Metal Work rooms and the Trade Training Centre to create numerous metal work projects. Students will be required to create a Major Project in the HSC course. Course Cost: Prelim: $60 HSC: $40

  7. Industrial Technology Timber Products and Furniture Technologies “I was always good at Woodwork in Year 7, 8, 9 and 10 and got good reports, but IT is better because you can choose what you make for your major project.” Year 12 Student from Kingswood High School Rationale Much of Australia’s economic, social and cultural development can be related to the capacity of our industries to develop and use technology in the manufacture of goods and services. The effective and responsible application of industrial technologies has a direct bearing upon the quality of our lives. For this reason, the study of industrial technology and its role in industry is relevant and purposeful for many students. Industrial Technology seeks to raise students’ awareness of the interaction between technology, industry, society and the environment, and to develop their ability to make value judgements about issues, decisions and problems arising from this interaction. Students achieve this by applying practical experiences to the study of the technology, management and organisation of industry. The current Australian industrial workforce is diverse in nature, gender-inclusive and better educated through ongoing training and development. Kingswood High School encourages all students to consider this subject regardless of gender, ethnicity or other perceived barriers. Increasing retention rates within NSW schools have resulted in a need to link the senior school curriculum more closely with post-school vocational education and work options. This syllabus acknowledges the need to strengthen such links. Through a process of observing and analysing industry practice and through personal practical experiences, students will gain knowledge and skills together with appropriate attitudes about technology and industry. Post-school, the study of Industrial Technology Stage 6 provides students with knowledge, understanding and skills that form a valuable foundation for a range of courses at university and other tertiary institutions. In addition, the study of Industrial Technology Stage 6 assists students to prepare for employment and full and active participation as citizens. In particular, there are opportunities for students to gain recognition in vocational education and training. Teachers and students should be aware of these opportunities. The course has been designed to be inclusive of the needs, interests and aspirations of students and it provides opportunities for them to learn explicitly about gender issues relating to the industry studied. It also caters for students who wish to undertake further study in a related area at university level or to pursue further industry training. Therefore the skills and knowledge gained through the study of Industrial Technology Stage 6 will enable students to make positive contributions to Australian industry and society.

  8. Course Costs Course costs are $60 for the Preliminary Course (payable in Term 1) and $40 for the HSC Course (payable in Term 4). These costs cover some project equipments and machinery use and maintenance. Students will be required to source their own project materials for the Major Practical Project. Course Structure The Preliminary course of 120 indicative hours consists of project work and an industry study that provide a broad range of skills and knowledge related to the focus area chosen and an introduction to processes, skills and practices relevant to the design, management, communication and construction of practical projects. The HSC course of 120 indicative hours consists of the development, management and communication of a major practical project and folio that contribute to the development of knowledge, skills and understanding related to the focus area of study. Both the Preliminary and HSC courses are organised around four sections: • Industry Study • Design, Management and Communication • Production • Industry Related Manufacturing Technology

  9. Food Technology Food Technology Stage 6 aims to develop an understanding about food systems and skills that enable students to make informed decisions and carry out responsible actions. Students will also develop an appreciation of the importance of food to the wellbeing of the individual and to the social and economic future of Australia. For the purposes of the Food Technology Stage 6 Syllabus, food technology refers to knowledge and activities that relate to meeting food needs and wants. The provision and consumption of food are significant activities of human endeavour, with vast resources being expended across domestic, commercial and industrial settings. Food issues have a constant relevance to life. This concept underpins the subject and is reflected throughout the Preliminary and HSC courses. The syllabus provides students with a broad knowledge of food technology. The factors that influence food availability and selection are examined and current food consumption patterns in Australia investigated. Food handling is addressed with emphasis on ensuring safety and managing the sensory characteristics and functional properties of food to produce a quality product. The role of nutrition in contributing to the health of the individual and the social and economic future of Australia is explored. The structure of the Australian food industry is outlined and the operations of one organisation investigated. Production and processing practices are examined and their impact evaluated. The activities that support food product development are identified and the process applied in the development of a food product. Contemporary nutrition issues are raised, investigated and debated. This knowledge enables students to make informed responses to changes in the production to consumption continuum and exert an influence on future developments in the food industry as educated citizens and in their future careers.

  10. Opportunities exist for students to develop skills relating to food that are relevant and transferable to other settings. Such skills include the ability to research, analyse and communicate. Students also develop the capability and competence to experiment with and prepare food as well as design, implement and evaluate solutions to a range of food situations. The syllabus is inclusive of the needs, interests and aspirations of both genders and provides opportunities and challenges for students of all abilities to deal with food products and systems. In order to be a relevant and meaningful learning experience, which fully extends students’ understanding and application of food technology, programs developed from this syllabus must take into consideration the life experiences, values, learning styles and characteristics of both male and female students. The knowledge, skills and attitudes gained during the course will have applications to, and provide benefits for, both vocational and general life experiences. With the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained through the study of this syllabus, young men and women will have the potential to contribute positively to their own future and to the social, economic and ecological future of Australia. Course Cost: Prelim: $100 HSC: $100 This covers ingredients and equipment used In practical and theoretical classes.

  11. Practical Lessons and Catering

  12. Year 11 Function Evening

  13. Textiles and Design “Doing a practical subject like Textiles was the best move I made – because it gives me a chance to unwind and work on something enjoyable when I do my practical work. Even though the course is hard, it’s relaxing at the same time...” Year 12 Student from Kingswood High School. Rationale The Textiles and Design Stage 6 Syllabus provides a curriculum structure that reflects the important role that textiles play in society. Textiles protect, provide comfort, have social meaning, respond to cultural influences and perform a range of necessary functions in the textiles industry and other industries. Textiles and Design investigates the science and technology of textiles through a study of properties and performance, allowing students to make informed consumer choices in the textiles area. Technological and practical skills are developed and enhanced through the use of textile-related technologies, including those that are computer based. The concept of design elements and principles, as being both functional and aesthetic and as part of the creative design process, are examined within the specialised field of textiles. This course also investigates textiles in society and promotes a greater understanding of the significance of different cultures and their specific use of textile materials.

  14. Through the area of study relating to the Australian Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Allied Industries, the course offers students the opportunity to explore advances in technology, current issues facing the industry and employment opportunities.Textiles and Design develops a body of knowledge, skills and values that contribute to the overall education of students and which can provide opportunities for small business and leisure activities useful throughout life. It develops student creativity and project management skills that promote self-esteem and satisfaction. Students develop an understanding that textiles in industry, small business and in leisureactivities has an emphasis on project work and students emulate this through the designing, planning and manufacturing of a Major Textiles Project.The study of Textiles and Design Stage 6 provides students with knowledge, understanding and skills that form a valuable foundation for a range of courses at university and other tertiary institutions, such as the Whitehouse Institute of Design. In addition, the study of Textiles and Design allows students to contribute positively to industry and society. Course CostsCourse costs are $40 for the Preliminary Course (payable in Term 1) and $40 for the HSC Course (payable in Term 4). These costs cover some project equipments and machinery use and maintenance. Students will be required to source their own project materials for the Major Textiles Project.

  15. Year 12 Major Textiles Project- Work in Progress

  16. VET HospitalityIndustry Curriculum Framework Why study Hospitality? Hospitality focuses on providing customer service. Skills learned can be transferred across a range of industries. Workplaces for which Hospitality competencies are required include cafes, catering organisations and resorts. Samples of occupations students can aim for in the hospitality industry: chef events coordinator bar assistant food & beverage manager reservations clerk front office receptionist guest service coordinator Course description: “ This course is based on units of competency, which have been developed by the hospitality industry to describe the competencies, skills and knowledge required by workers in the industry. The course incorporates core units of competency plus units from various functional areas such as: kitchen attending, commercial cookery, commercial catering, food and beverage, front office, housekeeping and sales/office operations. An optional HSC Examination is able to be undertaken in Year 12 that can contribute to the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) for university entrance. HSC Course Requirements regarding Work Placement: Students must complete a minimum of 70 hours of mandatory work placement.

  17. Recognition of Prior Learning: If you have already completed all or part of a similar vocational course elsewhere, such as at TAFE, your previous studies and results will be recognised. You will not have to repeat that training and assessment. Additionally if through previous work or life experiences you have already developed high level skills in this course area, these may also be able to be recognised. Your teacher or VET Coordinator can provide more details of the recognition process. Course costs: Prelim: $170 HSC: $60 Course requirements: Full Service Uniform – Black tailored pants, black shirt, black apron and enclosed leather shoes. Course Structure: Hospitality (240 indicative hours) This course has been revised by the Board of Studies to comply with the new Hospitality Training Package (SIT07). CAFE SKILLS STREAM: Core Units

  18. Making and Serving Espresso Coffee and Non Alcoholic Beverages Year 12 Graduation

  19. VET constructionIndustry Curriculum Framework Why study Construction? Construction provides students with the opportunity to gain a range of skills suitable for employment in the construction industry and to provide pathways for further study. Working in the construction industry involves: constructing buildings modifying buildings contracting designing buildings measuring materials and sites communicating with clients Samples of occupations students can aim for in the construction industry: building bricklaying carpentry Concreting joinery plastering roofing shop fitting sign writing tiling

  20. Course description: This course is based on units of competency, which have been developed by the construction industry to describe the competencies, skills and knowledge required by workers in the industry. The course incorporates core units plus a range of elective units from the General Construction sector. A mandatory WorkCover NSW approved general OH&S induction-training program, as well as a work activity OH&S training and site-specific OH&S training must be completed before students are allowed onto a work site. An optional HSC Examination is able to be undertaken in Year 12 that can contribute to the Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) for university entrance. HSC Course requirements regarding Work Placement: Students must complete a minimum of 70 hours of mandatory work placement. Recognition of Prior Learning: If you have already completed all or part of a similar vocational course elsewhere, such as at TAFE, your previous studies and results will be recognised. You will not have to repeat that training and assessment. Additionally if through previous work or life experiences you have already developed high level skills in this course area, these may also be able to be recognised. Your teacher or VET Coordinator can provide more details of the recognition process. Course costs: $ 190 (Prelim) $ 60 (HSC)