3rd Annual Electronics Recycling SUMMIT
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3rd Annual Electronics Recycling SUMMIT Research and Development Needs in the Electronics Recycling Industry May 8, 2002 San Francisco, CA Working Group Leaders Reggie J. Caudill, New Jersey Institute of Technology Edward Grenchus, IBM Corporation

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3rd Annual Electronics Recycling SUMMIT

Research and Development Needs

in the Electronics Recycling Industry

May 8, 2002

San Francisco, CA


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Working Group Leaders

  • Reggie J. Caudill, New Jersey Institute of Technology

  • Edward Grenchus, IBM Corporation

  • Glenn Kuntz, Concurrent Technologies Corporation

  • David Dickinson, NJIT MERC (formerly with Lucent )

  • R. Charles Boelkins, Georgia Dept of Natural Resources

  • Richard Lehman, Rutgers University

  • Jane Ammons, Georgia Tech


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Working Group Team Members

  • Brenda Baney, DELCO Electronic Systems

  • Earl Beaver, Bridges to Sustainability

  • Scott Campbell, IBM Corporation

  • Gary DiRusso, Lifecycle Business Partners

  • Michael Fisher, American Plastics Council

  • Ketan Limaye, Concurrent Technologies Corporation

  • Michael Magliaro, Lifecycle Business Partners

  • Joseph Nardone, Envirocycle


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Working Group Team Members

  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers University

  • Mathew Realff, Georgia Tech

  • Asif Shaikh, IBM Corporation

  • Steve Skurnac, Micrometallics Corporation

  • Gregory Voorhees, Envirocycle

  • Marino Xanthos, New Jersey Institute of Technology

  • Larry Yehle, IBM Corporation


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Objective of R&D Needs Study

Long-term Objective: To create and monitor projects that will support the infrastructure towards a goal of sustainability with zero waste.

Objective for Year 1: To identify and prioritize critical R&D needs leading to future projects that will support the infrastructure towards a goal of sustainability with zero waste.


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Motivation

The electronics recycling industry is driven by ever increasing pressures to improve operational efficiencies, reduce costs and maximize value. In order to achieve these expectations and realize the full potential of this industry, a concerted effort must be undertaken to assure access to the most efficient technologies, operational strategies and management practices possible. In the long term, success requires that a strong research and development base dedicated specifically to the needs of the electronics recycling industry be established: an R&D stream flowing seamlessly from discovery to application


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Purpose

To date, the research and development infrastructure supporting this industry has been fairly disjoint and uncoordinated with no broad based effort to define needs and recommend directions

The purpose of this study is to bridge this gap by better understanding the R&D needs of the industry in order to identify and prioritize critical projects that support the infrastructure towards a goal of sustainability with zero waste.


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Scope

The study is looking at the R&D needs not only at the end-of-life stage of products but all along the extended supply chain—those industry segments operating both upstream and downstream of the electronic recyclers. This broad systems perspective reflects the interactions and linkages that exist between product manufacturers, logistics and collection infrastructure, recyclers, and a host of customers in the secondary marketplace.


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Framework

Four topical thrust areas were identified which provided a framework to discuss the R&D needs and structure the evaluation. The topical thrusts and major R&D areas are described below:

1. Electronic Product Manufacturers

·     Design for Environment (DfE)

·       Materials and Processing

·     Enterprise Integration and Decision Support, including performance evaluation

·       Product Tracking

·   Regulatory and Policy Concerns, including restricted/regulated materials


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Framework

2. Collection Infrastructure and Logistics/Reverse Logistics

· System Analysis, Modeling and Simulation

·   Operations Management

·    Equipment and Technologies

·  Regulatory and Policy Concerns, including restricted/regulated materials


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Framework

  • 3. Recycling Technologies and Operational Support Systems

  • ·   Materials Recovery: Metals, Glass, Plastics, and Electronics

  • ·  Disassembly Processes and Systems Operations

  • ·   Recycling Facility Management and Operational Support, including performance evaluation

  • Regulatory and Policy Concerns, including restricted/regulated materials


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Framework

  • 4. Market Development for Secondary Materials and Components

  • ·   New Markets for Recovered Materials: Plastics and Glass

  • ·     Business Strategies

  • ·     Regulatory and Policy Concerns, including restricted/regulated materials


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Leveraging Efforts

We would like to acknowledge the National Science Foundation (NSF) Workshop on Environmentally Benign Manufacturing for input on product design issues. Some of the Working Group members participated in the NSF workshop and levered their insights and discussions on R&D issues with both initiatives.


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Status

  • A draft document has been prepared and is in the review process.

  • Some of the subsections are still under development.

  • R&D issues need to be prioritized.

  • These areas will be discussed at the Roundtable today.

  • We welcome everyone to participate…today and tomorrow…to make sure this study addresses the full R&D needs of the industry and adds real value for you.


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3rd Annual Electronics Recycling SUMMIT

Report Back to SUMMIT from

R&D Focus Area Roundtable

May 8, 2002

San Francisco, CA


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Roundtable Participants

  • Chuck Boelkins, Georgia Dept of Natural Resources

  • David Dickinson, NJIT MERC (formerly with Lucent )

  • Dan Fadgen, Universal Solutions, Intl

  • Paul Galbraith, CTC

  • Bill Hoffman, Motorola

  • Craig Lorch, Total Reclaim, Inc.

  • Chet McNamara, Salvage I

  • Betty Patton, Environmental Practices

  • Andreas Schneider, Sony International Europe

  • Richard Zahrobsky, SI Technology


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Agenda of Roundtable

OFF TO A GOOD START…Pete threw us out of our meeting room.

SHOWTIME…Viewed a video on new process technology for compounding commingled recycled plastics into usable feedstock.

GOT DOWN TO BUSINESS…Reviewed working draft document, discussed R&D issues for each research thrust areas, and identified priority issues for each area.


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R&D Topical Thrusts

  • Electronic Product Manufacturers

  • Collection Infrastructure and Logistics/ Reverse Logistics

  • 3. Recycling Technologies and Operational Support Systems

  • 4. Market Development for Secondary Materials and Components


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Electronic Product Manufacturers

  • Design for Environment (DfE)

  • 1. To develop quantitative, scientific-based sustainability metrics and streamlined LCA which can be easily integrated into design and decision support frameworks. Emphasis should be given to end-of-life management with concern for reuse/recycling hierarchy.

  • 2. To provide integrated, shared databases that are accessible, controlled for proper access, complete, and accurate.


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Electronic Product Manufacturers

Materials and Processing

1. To explore the linkage between secondary feedstock material composition and consistency and the recycling technology and processing employed to recover the materials. Concern should address potential risk from an EH&S perspective and examine the question of what and how materials should be recycled to truly minimize lifecycle environmental impact.


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Electronic Product Manufacturers

Materials and Processing

2. To perform qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the effect of contaminants in the waste stream to determine the levels of purity or separation required to generate useful feedstocks from the waste stream and relate to product design criteria


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Electronic Product Manufacturers

Enterprise Integration and Decision Support

1. To achieve horizontal and vertical integration of product and process data into a single enterprise-wide information system

2. To explore strategies to implement and integrate DfE seamlessly into the corporate structure


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Electronic Product Manufacturers

Product Tracking

1. Devise and implement unit identifiers that are historically unique to preserve tracking capability and accountability, I.e. product recall, and to merge product tracking data to outbound fulfillment data.

2. To explore cost-effective photo-chemical taggants into polymers to enable efficient high-speed automated sorting by resin type.


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Collection Infrastructure & Logistics

1. To develop robust, verifiable models to estimate numbers of EOL computers, televisions and other electronic equipment accumulated and forecast in the residential sector.

2. To investigate hazardous material composition in electronic components and determine appropriate handling, shipping and recovery options.

3. To benchmark collection infrastructures and associated models developed for other industry sectors and extend to electronics recycling.


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Collection Infrastructure & Logistics

1. To develop robust, verifiable models to estimate numbers of EOL computers, televisions and other electronic equipment accumulated and forecast in the residential sector.

2. To investigate hazardous material composition in electronic components and determine appropriate handling, shipping and recovery options.

3. To benchmark collection infrastructures and associated models developed for other industry sectors and extend to electronics recycling.


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Recycling Technologies & Operational Support Systems

1. A cost-effective process for recovering precious metals, base metals, and nonmetal materials from printed circuit card assemblies while minimizing environmental impacts associated with processing.

2. Low-cost, high-speed methods to accurately and efficiently identify different types and blends of plastic materials at the flake level.

3. High-throughput, cost-effective methods of processing (cutting, cleaning, sorting,…) CRT glass into furnace-ready cullet to satisfy an identified market demand


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Recycling Technologies & Operational Support Systems

4.  For reuse, an ability to quickly cross reference various OEM part numbers and descriptions with cost effective identification: Manufacturer name, model and serial number, asset verification, etc .

5. An improved process to receive and verify electronic equipment requiring demilitarization or asset protection .

6. Visual identification aides (color coding) that identify the location and type of hazardous materials, the location and type of fasteners, the location or type of industry standard parts


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Recycling Technologies & Operational Support Systems

7. The EPA should expeditiously promulgate it's final ruling for CRT-containing products and allow for the hazardous waste regulation exemption if this material is used in the manufacture of new CRT-type glass, other glass products, or used in a lead smelter as a fluxing agent. The burden of the RCRA hazardous waste regulation should not impede the beneficial recycling of end of life electronic equipment, especially for uses which are economically viable and have positive environmental performance over existing products.


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Market Development for Secondary Mat'l & Components

1. A critical need for product development is to develop products and processes that are sufficiently robust with regard to raw material variability that they can tolerate the fluctuations in reclaimed material supply.

2. To benchmark existing materials/products used in the building and construction industry to identify and screen potential new end-use applications for recycled materials in terms of cost and performance requirements; then, match to e-waste characteristics.


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Next Steps for the R&D Working Group

  • Modify current working draft document to include comments from roundtable discussions and any other input from the SUMMIT participants…6/15/02.

  • Review revised document by expanded working group members…6/30/02.

  • Final draft completed and ready for dissemination…7/30/02.

  • Meet with NSF/EPA program managers …9/15/02.


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