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Using School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports (SW-PBS) to Build Sustainable Systems within Alternative School Settings. Susan Barrett Sheppard Pratt Health System OSEP Center on PBIS Rob Horner, George Sugai, Tim Lewis www.pbis.org www.pbismaryland.org. Organizer.

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slide1

Using School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports (SW-PBS)

to Build Sustainable Systems within Alternative School Settings

Susan Barrett

Sheppard Pratt Health System

OSEP Center on PBIS

Rob Horner, George Sugai, Tim Lewis

www.pbis.org

www.pbismaryland.org

organizer
Organizer
  • Overview of PBIS- How do you get teachers to implement best practices with fidelity? How do you achieve your annual performance goals?
  • State Example- What is going on in your state? How can you link with state or local initiative?
  • School Examples- What does this look like in alternative settings?
  • Questions
  • Inauguration
school wide positive behavior support current implementation
School-wide Positive Behavior Support:Current Implementation
  • School-wide Positive Behavior Support
  • 7500 schools in 44 states
      • Team
      • Coach
      • Curriculum emphasizing prevention: Define and teach appropriate social behavior to all students
      • Formal system for rewarding appropriate behavior
      • Intensive, individual interventions based on behavioral function
      • On-going data collection and use of data for active decision-making
slide5

7500 Schools across 44 states implementing

school-wide positive behavior support

need to know
Need to Know
  • Cultural fit
  • Building on “What works”
  • Focus on the Staff
worry 1
Worry #1
  • Do we live in a punishing work environment ?
  • How do we create systems that support staff?
predictable work environments are places where employees
Predictable work environments are places where employees:
  • Know what is expected
  • Have materials & equipment to do job correctly
  • Receive recognition each week for good work
  • Have supervisor who cares & pays attention
  • Receive encouragement to contribute & improve
  • Can identify person at work who is “best friend”
  • Feels mission of organization makes them feel like their jobs are important
  • See people around them committed to doing good job
  • Feel like they are learning new things
  • Have opportunity to do the job well

(Buckingham & Coffman 2002, Gallup)

slide9
Many Begin, Many LeaveAdelman and TaylorPreparing All Education Personnel to Address Barriers to Learning and Teaching2008

Predictions of shortages of 2 million educators

over the next decade…

Data in the U.S. indicate about

15% of new teachers leave in the first year,

30% within three years and

40-50% within the first five years.

(Smith and Ingersoll, 2003)

on school reform
On school reform…

Kauffman states “…attempts to reform education will make little difference until reformers understand that schools must exist as much for teachers as for student. Put another way, schools will be successful in nurturing the intellectual, social, and moral development of children only to the extent that they also nurture such development of teachers.” (1993, p. 7).

worry 2
Worry #2
  • Too much to do
  • We add more and more each year
  • How can we be better prepared to integrated into existing programs?
memo to school administrators from district administrators
MemoTo: School AdministratorsFrom: District Administrators

In keeping with the new state initiative, this fall we will be implementing an exciting new district initiative of SNI in place of LYI. All in-service days previously scheduled for LYI will be rescheduled as staff development for SNI. The $500 for release time and materials for LYI will be discontinued and provided instead for SNI. By the way, you will need to create local SNI teams that meet weekly. The former members of your LYI team would be perfect for this new team. Your new SNI binders will be coming next week. Have a great year!!!

14 initiatives
14 Initiatives
  • School Counseling Services
  • Second Step
  • FBA/BIP’s
  • School Health
  • Social Skills
  • Bully proofing
  • Anger Management
  • Student Intervention Plans
  • Behavioral Contracting
  • Character Education
  • 504 Plans/IEP
  • CICO
  • Responsive Classroom
  • Expanded School Mental Health
competing or coordinated
Competing or Coordinated
  • Need for a framework, the anchor, for all school improvement efforts
  • Common language, Common logic
slide15

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

SCHOOL-WIDE

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students

27

slide16

INTENSIVE

Wrap Team

Student Services Team

TARGETED

ESMH

UNIVERSAL

Family

Leadership Team

School counseling services

Second Step

FBAs/BIPs

School health services

Social skills, bully proofing, and/or anger management groups

Student Intervention Plans

Behavioral contracting

Health Education Voluntary State Curriculum

Character Education

Section 504 Plans and/or IEPs

Alternative programs

Check-in/Check-out

Responsive counseling

Bullying Prevention

School mental health services

Expanded School Mental Health Initiatives and Interagency Partnerships

slide17

Triangle Activity:

Applying the Three-Tiered Logic to Your School

Tier 3

Tier 2

Tier 1

slide18

Triangle Activity:

Applying the Three-Tiered Logic to Charles Carroll

Tier 3FBA / BIP IEP / 504 Wilson Reading

Inclusion PD Assistive Technology

Framing Your ThoughtsTouch Math

Tier 2Focused Guidance Groups IST AEL, EIR, SOAR

Check-in / Check-outSuccessMaker+

Behavior ContractsDouble Dose Instruction

PST; PPWRIT Resource

Fundations

Student Intervention Plans

Tier 1 PBIS Expectations Leadership TeamExplicit Instruction

Chippy Coupons Inclusive School Gradual Release Model

Schoolwide Celebrations Data Binders Specific Learning Targets

PBIS Lesson Plans & Matrix PTA Partnership Objective Deconstruction

PBIS Brochure & Home ConnectionFormative Assessment PD

Character Education Community Partners Habits of Mind Focus

Guidance CounselorProgress Monitoring-SIT

Aligned Discipline ReferralsGrades 3-5 SuccessMaker

Celebree DaycareAssessment-Data PDSA

Check ClubVolunteers

Yearbook ClubGr. 4-5 Geography Club

educational initiatives
Educational Initiatives
  • Guiding Principles (Coyne 2008)
    • Promoting evidence based practices
    • Supporting change at the systems level (feasible, consistent and relevant to local needs)
    • Developing local capacity to sustain effective practices over time
sample implementation map building the system
Sample Implementation “Map”Building the System

2+ years of school team training

Annual “booster” events

Coaching/facilitator support @ school & district levels

Regular self-assessment & evaluation data

On-going preparation of trainers

Development of local/district leadership teams

Establishment of state/regional leadership & policy team

what is school wide positive behavior support
What is School-wide Positive Behavior Support?
  • School-wide PBS is:
    • A systems approach for establishing the social culture and behavioral supports needed for schools to be effective learning environments for all students.
  • Evidence-based features of SW-PBS
    • Prevention
    • Define and teach positive social expectations
    • Acknowledge positive behavior
    • Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior
    • On-going collection and use of data for decision-making
    • Continuum of intensive, individual interventions.
    • Administrative leadership – Team-based implementation (Systems that support effective practices)
slide22

Social Responsibility &

Academic Achievement

Positive

behavior

Support

Not specific practice or

curriculum…it’s a

general approach

to preventing

problem behavior

and encouraging

prosocial behavior

OUTCOMES

Not limited to any

particular group of

students…it’s

for all students

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff behavior

DATA

SYSTEMS

Not new…its based on

long history of

effective educational

practices & strategies

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student behavior

why bother
Why Bother?

In 1 year, 1 school (880) had 5100 ODRs, 1 student received 87 ODRs, & 1 teacher gave out 273 ODRs

In 1 urban school district: 2004-05, 400 kindergartners were expelled

In 1 state 55% white, 73% Latino, & 88% Black 4th graders aren’t proficient readers

Many pre-service teachers have no behavior/classroom management course for teachers or administrators

1st response to school violence is “get tougher”

In 1 K-3 school, no teacher could give reading levels of their students

2nd grade student receives “body sock” & “lemon drop” therapy to treat violent school behavior

In 1 state 7% of “high experience” teachers & 17% of reading specialists can identify at least 2 indicators of early reading success (e.g., phonemic awareness, fluency)

Across nation, students who are truant are given out-of-school suspensions

slide24
5,100 referrals =

76,500 min @15 min =

1,275 hrs =

159 days @ 8 hrs

problem statement
Problem Statement

“We give schools strategies & systems for developing positive, effective, achieving, & caring school & classroom environments, but implementation is not accurate, consistent, or durable. Schools need more than training.”

sw pbs logic
SW-PBS Logic!

Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable

(Zins & Ponti, 1990)

general implementation process getting started
GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

Team

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

slide29

SWPBS

Subsystems

School-wide

Classroom

Family

Non-classroom

Student

slide30

School-wide

1. Common purpose & approach to discipline

2. Clear set of positive expectations & behaviors

3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior

4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior

5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior

6. Procedures for on-going monitoring & evaluation

slide31

SWPBS Implementers’ Blueprint Elements

Visibility

Political Support

Funding

Leadership Team

Evaluation

Training

Coaching

Local School Teams/Demonstrations

slide32

Pennsylvania

West Virginia

Delaware

D.C.

Virginia

maryland organizational model

State

District

School

Classroom

Student

Maryland Organizational Model

School Level

  • 467 PBIS Teams (one per school)

- Team leaders (one per school)

- Behavior Support Coaches (250+)

District Level (24)

  • Regional Coordinators

State Level

  • State Leadership Team

- Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE)

- Sheppard Pratt Health System

- Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention of Youth Violence

- 24 Local school districts

- Department of Juvenile Services, Mental Health Administration

  • Management Team
  • Advisory Group

National Level

  • National PBIS Technical Assistance Center

- University of Oregon & University of Connecticut

maryland organizational model38

State

District

School

Classroom

Student

Maryland Organizational Model

School Level

  • 554 PBIS Teams (one per school)
    • Team leaders (one per school)
    • Behavior Support Coaches (380+)
maryland organizational model40

State

District

School

Classroom

Student

Maryland Organizational Model

School Level

  • 554 PBIS Teams (one per school)
    • Team leaders (one per school)
    • Behavior Support Coaches (380+)

District Level (24)

  • Regional Coordinators

State Level

  • State Leadership Team
    • Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE)
    • Sheppard Pratt Health System
    • Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention of Youth Violence
    • 24 Local school districts
    • Department of Juvenile Services, Mental Health Administration
  • Management Team
  • Advisory Group

National Level

  • National PBIS Technical Assistance Center
    • University of Oregon & University of Connecticut
maryland s tiered instructional and positive behavioral interventions and supports pbis framework

Behavioral Systems

Academic Systems

  • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions
  • Strategies to address needs of individual students with intensive needs
  • Function-based assessments
  • Intense, durable strategies
  • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions
  • Address individual needs of student
  • Assessment-based
  • High Intensity
  • Targeted, Group Interventions
  • Small, needs-based groups for
  • at risk students who do not respond
  • to universal strategies
  • High efficiency
  • Rapid response
  • Targeted, Group Interventions
  • Small, needs-based groups for at- risk students who do not respond to universal strategies
  • High efficiency/ Rapid response
  • Function-based logic
  • Core Curriculum and
  • Differentiated Instruction
  • All students
  • Preventive, proactive
  • School-wide or classroom
  • systems for ALL students
  • Core Curriculum and
  • Universal Interventions
  • All settings, all students
  • Preventive, proactive
  • School-wide or classroom systems for ALL students and staff
Maryland’s Tiered Instructional and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Framework

1-5%

1-5%

5-10%

5-10%

80-90%

80-90%

pbis md research project project target
PBIS MD Research Project: Project Target

Design

Federally funded 5-year randomized controlled trial (CDC & NIMH)

37 elementary schools in 5 districts

29,427 students and 3,563 staff

Key Findings

High fidelity implementation of PBIS

PBIS increased school’s organizational health

Staff perceptions of leadership, support, focus on academics, collegiality etc.

Especially those schools starting at a slightly lower level

Impact on students

Reductions in office discipline referrals (60% less likely to receive an ODR)

Reductions in school-level suspensions (reduced by 24%)

Reduced need for counseling (34-46% less likely to need/receive counseling)

Reduced need for special education (27-38% less likely to need/referred sped)

Positive trend in MSA achievement (2-6 percentage points)

Project Target

pbis plus project
PBISplus Project

Design

Federally funded 3-year randomized controlled trial (U.S.DOE)

46 elementary schools (in 6 districts) that have high fidelity PBIS & “yellow-zone” needs

Random assignment to either “SWPBIS” or “Plus” condition

Aims

Address needs of PBIS “non-responders”

Increase use of evidence-based programs

Reduce inappropriate referrals to special education

Reduce behavior problems & improve achievement

Reduce disproportionality

Strategy

Provide training, support, and on-site technical assistance to SSTs and staff regarding:

Simplified functional behavioral assessment and “function-based thinking”

Evidence-based programs

Effective teaming and collaborative problem-solving

Cultural competency & culturally appropriate interventions

PBISplus

slide44

The need to enhance environmental structures increases

The frequency for collecting and acting upon information increases

The required resources to address the problem increases

Core Support Program:

Provided to all, intended to reach most

Continuum of Supports

opportunities to increase visibility
Opportunities to Increase Visibility
  • The Delinquency Prevention and Diversion Services Task Force
  • School Safety Action Planning Committee-Twice
  • International School Mental Health Conference
  • Blueprint for Mental Health’s Emotional Disturbance Workgroup
  • Child Welfare Training Academy
  • Youth Investment Project
  • Pupil Personnel State meeting
  • Charles County Pupil Personnel Workers and Guidance/School Counselors Meeting
  • APBS/PBIS Implementers Forums
slide46

PBIS Systems Implementation Logic

Visibility

Political Support

Funding

Leadership Team

Active Coordination

Evaluation

Training

Coaching

Local School Teams/Demonstrations

pbis maryland s annual training events
PBIS Maryland’s Annual Training Events
  • Leadership Forum
    • March 30, 2009
  • Coaches and New Team Institute
    • Coaches ~ July 20, 2009
    • Elementary ~ July 21-22, 2009
    • Secondary ~ July 23-24, 2009
  • Regional Returning Team Trainings
    • Central Regions 1 and 2
    • Eastern Shore
    • Upper Shore
    • Western Region
    • Southern Region
  • Coaches Meetings (4/year)
  • Regional Team Leader/Coach Meetings (2/year)
  • Schools serving students with special needs - MANSEF (2/year)
  • High Schools – (2/year)
current energy and efforts
Current Energy and Efforts
  • Institutionalize funding level and commitment at MSDE

- Divisions of Student Services and Special Education

  • Pursue other funding opportunities
  • Expand and sustain green zone with high fidelity
  • Increase marketing and visibility
  • Implement yellow zone in districts that have solid green zone and have infrastructure to expand
  • Continue linkage with school mental health, Systems of Care, and wraparound efforts
slide49

PBIS in Alternative School Settings

Examples: Forbush, Children’s Guild, St. Elizabeth

Homewood, Mary Moss

provide a continuum of schoolwide support
Provide a Continuum of Schoolwide Support

Individualized Systems

Specialized Group Systems

Primary Prevention

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems

homewood continuum of schoolwide support
Homewood Continuum of Schoolwide Support

Individualized Systems

Specialized Group Systems

Primary Prevention

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems

general implementation process getting started52
GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

Team

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

get staff input
Get Staff Input
  • Formal and Informal Surveys- Staff, Students, Family, Community
  • Academic and Behavior Data
  • Attendance- Staff and Students
  • Staff Retention
  • Anecdotal
  • Direct Observation
our highest priority areas for improvement are
Our highest priority areas for improvement are:

Teach expected behaviors (54%)

Develop booster activities based on school data (58%)

Give consistent consequences for problem behaviors (71%)

Distinguish between classroom-managed and office-managed behaviors (64%)

Define consequences (61%)

Assess and report patterns of behavior (58%)

Implement Classroom procedures consistent with schoolwide procedures (60%)

Homewood Pre-PBIS Survey results

You Told us

slide56

Team-led Process

Non-Teaching

Family

Behavioral

Capacity

Priority &

Status

Representation

Specialized Support

Administrator

Team

Community

Data-based

Decision

Making

Administrator

Student

Teaching

Communications

Start with

Team that

“Works.”

universals connect points to families
Universals: Connect Points To Families
  • Primary Focus = Awareness
    • Information, Information, Information (2-way)
      • Educators and parents sharing information across multiple venues
  • Involvement
    • Parent team member
    • Specific activities to partner with families at school
      • Clear timelines, what is expected, outcomes
  • Support
    • Information regarding range of services & supports
    • Referral Points
    • Strategies for home use
slide60

Family Engagement Checklist

    • Muscott and Mann – New Hampshire
slide61

3-4 Year

Commitment

Top 3 School-

Wide

Initiatives

3-Tiered

Prevention

Logic

Agreements &

Supports

Coaching &

Facilitation

Administrative

Participation

Dedicated

Resources

& Time

slide62

Self-Assessment

Efficient

Systems of Data

Management

Existing

Discipline

Data

Data-based

Action Plan

Team-based

Decision

Making

Multiple

Systems

Evidence-

Based

Practices

SWIS

do we need to tweak our action plan
How often?

Who?

What?

Where?

When?

How much?

If problem,

Which students/staff?

What system?

What intervention?

What outcome?

Do we need to tweak our action plan?

+ If many students are making same mistake, consider changing system….not students

+ Start by teaching, monitoring & rewarding…before increasing punishment

slide72

Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment

School Rules

NO Food

NO Weapons

NO Backpacks

NO Drugs/Smoking

NO Bullying

behavioral matrix
Behavioral Matrix
  • The next step in the process is to identify the 3-5 behavioral expectations and develop the behavioral matrix
      • Respect Yourself
      • Respect Others
      • Respect Property
define behaviors
Define Behaviors
  • Behavior Definitions
  • Office-Managed vs. Staff-managed
  • Behavior Expectations
teaching matrix activity
Teaching Matrix Activity

Classroom

Lunchroom

Bus

Hallway

Assembly

Respect Others

  • Use inside voice
  • ________
  • Eat your own food
  • __________
  • Stay in your seat
  • _________
  • Stay to right
  • _________
  • Arrive on time to speaker
  • __________

Respect Environment & Property

  • Recycle paper
  • _________
  • Return trays
  • __________
  • Keep feet on floor
  • __________
  • Put trash in cans
  • _________
  • Take litter with you
  • __________

Respect Yourself

  • Do your best
  • __________
  • Wash your hands
  • __________
  • Be at stop on time
  • __________
  • Use your words
  • __________
  • Listen to speaker
  • __________

Respect Learning

  • Have materials ready
  • __________
  • Eat balanced diet
  • __________
  • Go directly from bus to class
  • __________
  • Go directly to class
  • __________
  • Discuss topic in class w/ others
  • __________
pbis matrix for home
.PBIS Matrix for Home
  • I am respectful Listen to my parents
  • Be truthful to my parents
  • Play cooperatively
  • Speak nicely to others
  • I am responsible Put away my toys, bike, and equipment
  • Help with jobs at home
  • Follow my parents’ directions
  • Share Thursday folder with parents
  • I am safe Play safely with others
  • Stay in designated areas
  • Stay away from strangers
  • Wear bike helmet and equipment
  • I am prepared Finish homework and share with parent
  • Pack backpack at night for school the next day
  • Go to bed on time
  • Get up and get ready for school when called
designing the gotcha
Designing the “Gotcha”
  • The PBIS team met to decide the “Gotcha” symbol and implementation process
  • Domino was determined for symbol
  • Benchmarks were identified
  • Staff volunteered for community networking
  • Time schedule for implementation was developed
recognize success
Recognize Success
  • Call, write, and email home with good news.
  • Recognize achievement in class and publicly in the school.
  • Commend students on the spot.
  • Provide special recognition events and incentives
know what s working
Know What’s Working
  • SWIS
  • Spreadsheet
  • County data
  • Anecdotal
  • Reflect off the experts!
positive office referral
“Positive Office Referral”
  • Balancing positive/negative adult/student contacts in Oregon
  • Procedures
    • Develop equivalent positive referral
    • Process like negative referral
golden plunger
“Golden Plunger”
  • Involve custodian
  • Procedure
    • Custodian selects one classroom/ hallway each week that is clean & orderly
    • Sticks gold-painted plunger with banner on wall
i like my job
“I like my job”

Between Sep & Mar, 67 major behavior incidents were processed by office staff

= 2010 min. (30 min) or 33.5 hours

= 3.8% of 110 eight-hr days

= 96.2% of time to do

something else!

mom dad auntie jason
“Mom, Dad, Auntie, & Jason”

In a school where over 45% of 400 elem. students receive free-reduced lunch, >750 family members attended Family Fun Night.

i like workin at school
I like workin’ at school

After implementing SW-PBS, Principal at Jesse Bobo Elementary reports that teacher absences dropped from 414 (2002-2003) to 263 (2003-2004).

i like it here
“I like it here.”

Over past 3 years, 0 teacher requests for transfers

she can read
“She can read!”

With minutes reclaimed from improvements in proactive SW discipline, elementary school invests in improving school-wide literacy.

Result: >85% of students in 3rd grade are reading at/above grade level.

odr instruc benefit springfield ms md
ODR Instruc. BenefitSpringfield MS, MD

2001-2002 2277

2002-2003 1322

= 955 42% improvement

= 42,975 min. @ 45 min.

= 716.25 hrs

= 119 days Instruc. time

saving time
Saving Time

At Homewood

  • Streamlined school committees
  • Eliminated check sheets
  • Eliminated conflict over levels, etc.
  • More efficient and effective referrals
  • Fewer referrals
benefits
Benefits

1.School Climate

  • Results in an increase in

the amount of positive

feedback students receive

  • Provides a reminder to

staff to acknowledge student

behaviors that exemplify the

behavioral expectations

  • Students feel valued thereby

resulting in a positive

school climate

benefits96
Benefits

2.Data Decision-making:

  • Staff participate in monthly data

management review meetings

  • Program decisions made based

on data

  • Staff identify problem areas

for data collection

  • PBIS team collects data and

prepares for monthly

meeting review

  • Data management tools are

introduced to review data

data decision making
Data Decision Making
  • Professional development

activities:

    • Student groupings
    • Bus referrals
    • Time on task
    • Student attendance
    • Staff attendance
    • Crisis intervention trends
      • Transitions
      • Time of day
      • Day of week
      • Booster activities
benefits98
Benefits

3. Systems Orientation

  • Survey enables staff to

identify areas of strength

and areas of focus

  • Program focus centers

around developing

systems

  • Staff and program are more

effective when everyone

knows how to implement

systems

alignment
Alignment
  • FEDERAL MANDATES
  • No Child Left Behind
    • School Improvement Plan
    • Adequate Yearly Progress
      • Reading
      • Math
      • Attendance
alignment100
Alignment
  • School Improvement Plan
  • AYP performance targets
  • Data collection/analysis/action plan
  • Professional development
  • Family/community involvement
alignment101
Alignment
  • Comar Regulations
  • 13A.08.04 Student Behavior Interventions
    • School personnel are encouraged to use an array of positive behavior interventions, strategies and supports to increase or decrease targeted student behaviors

-Documentation of staff training methods and schedule

alignment102
Alignment
  • Individualized Education Plans
  • Increase in academic attainment, decrease in crisis intervention
  • Development of a Functional Behavioral Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plan
  • Social Emotional goals and objectives incorporating PBIS school-wide behavioral expectations
pbis throughout the school day
PBIS Throughout the School Day

• Bus Domino

Students receive dominoes for displaying

appropriate behavior on the bus

• Morning Meeting

Staff identify behavioral

expectation from matrix for the

day’s focus

pbis throughout the day
PBIS Throughout the Day

•Academics

  • Awarding of dominoes for

displaying behavioral

expectations

• Transitions

- Review behavioral

expectations for hallways

- Award dominoes

pbis throughout the day105
PBIS Throughout the Day

• Therapy

  • Implementation of behavioral

expectations aligned with

social/emotional goals

• Behavior Management

Program

- Daily progress report

aligned with PBIS

behavioral expectations

  • Functional Behavioral

Assessment/ Behavior

Intervention Plan

pbis throughout the day106
PBIS Throughout the Day
  • Data Management

•Students graph number of dominoes

received daily

•Students identify attainment of domino

benchmarks

red zone students
Red Zone Students
  • Brave Card = Be Respectful And Value Everyone
  • The Brave Card is a school-wide, check-in, check-out program for red zone students
  • The goal of the Brave Card program is to catch students early who are acting out and provide them with more frequent feedback on their behavior to prevent future problem behavior.
brave card process
Brave Card Process
  • Students are identified for the Brave Card who have an increase in disruptive behavior and who have problem behaviors across the day in different settings.
  • Staff make a referral to the PBIS team. In collaboration with the classroom staff, the PBIS team determine whether the Brave Card is an appropriate intervention.
  • If the student is identified as a viable candidate, the classroom team collects baseline data on the student for two weeks.
  • Data is reviewed to determine the student’s success rate and eligibility for the Brave Card program.
  • Once selected, the parent/guardian is notified and must sign a consent for the student to participate.
  • At the end of every quarter the student’s data is reviewed to determine if he/she is ready to be faded off the program. It is important to fade the student off the program as they become more independent in managing their own behavior.
celebrations
Celebrations
  • Students receive benchmarks at designated

intervals

• Weekly drawing for students and staff

• Classroom celebrations

• Program celebrations

roadblocks
How do we show that this is not “Train and Hope”?

What positive strategies might encourage resisters to buy in?

Are we underestimating the power of the positive?

How can we show progress?

How can we show that this is working?

Roadblocks
slide115
Time

Homewood

  • Staff reports more teaching time
  • Behavior room logs show decrease in out-of-class time
forbush school
Forbush School

Nonpublic Facility

10 programs statewide

244 Students

51 Primary

74 Secondary

58 Autism

49 Residential

data driven decisions
Data Driven Decisions

Data indicates an increase in the number of referrals during the transition from school to the bus in the afternoons.

  • Bus drivers are trained in PBIS
  • Revised bus point sheet
  • Systematic routine in place for dismissal
  • Staff are strategically stationed
  • Increase in High-fives during this

transition

  • Mentor program initiated
mentor program
Mentor Program

The Mentor

6-8th graders

The Mentini

K-2nd graders

Responsibilities

  • Meet Mentini in class
  • Help prepare for dismissal
  • Wrap-up social skills activity (with guidance)
  • Walk Mentini to bus

(with supervision)

  • Encourage/model positive behavior during this transition
mentor program119
Mentor Program
  • Resource teacher trained initial Mentors
  • Key Mentors earned “Senior Mentor” status
  • Each new Mentor is trained by one of the Senior Mentors
  • Positive behavior is expected (green or yellow)
  • PBIS kickoff – mentors are formally introduced
  • End of term-Mentor/Mentini field trip to transfer skills to the community
slide120

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our school
Our School
  • Member of MANSEF (Maryland Association of Nonpublic Special Education Facilities)
  • Our students range of 11-21 years of age
  • 125 Students
who we serve
Local School Systems

Baltimore County

Anne Arundel County

Carroll County

Harford County

Howard County

Prince Georges

County

Baltimore City

Federal Codes

01-mental retardation

04-speech or language impairment

06- emotional disturbance

08-other health impairments

09-specific learning

13- traumatic brain injury

14-Autism

Who We Serve
diagnostic continuum
Diagnostic Continuum

Pervasive Developmental Disorders:

  • Autism
  • Aspergers
  • PDD NOS

Axis I Disorders:

  • Anxiety D.O.
  • Obsessive Compulsive D.O.
  • Bi-Polar D.O.
  • Sensory Integration D.O.
  • ADHD, Depressive D.O.

Learning, & Speech and Language Disorders

tertiary prevention
Tertiary Prevention
  • Designed to focus on the needs of the individual student with patterns of problem behaviors that are dangerous, highly disruptive, and/or impede learning and social functioning
  • Most effective when positive primary systems are well established (School wide and Classroom Systems)
essential features
Essential Features
  • Identify goals: often called replacement behaviors
  • Data collection and analysis
  • Hypothesis: sometimes called summary statements
  • Multi-element plans: involve settings, structure, adult behavior, etc
  • Review, ongoing assessment
tertiary interventions
Tertiary Interventions
  • Often referred to as Functional Behavioral Assessment and Behavior Intervention Planning (FBA/BIP)
  • Focus is on individual student, his/her characteristics, specific circumstances
  • Allows team to vary features of process- data, extent of plan, etc. I.E. Labor intensive but worth it
  • (OSEP Technical Assistance Center on PBIS)
fba bip alignment
FBA/ BIP Alignment
  • No Child Left Behind
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
  • Code of Maryland Regulations
  • PBIS- A full continuum of PBS available for all students at the school and district level; Behaviorally competent personnel readily available; Function based approach serves as foundation for problem solving; Data collection to see if it’s working
  • IEP- Individual Educational Plan
fba bip tools
FBA/BIP TOOLS
  • TEXT:Building Positive Behavior Support Systems in Schools; Functional Behavioral Assessment
  • AUTHORS:Deanne A. Crone, Robert H. Horner
  • Appendix A: Request for Assistance Form
  • Appendix B: Action Team Plan (f-BSP Protocol)
slide132

APPENDIX C

Functional Assessment Checklist for Teachers and Staff (FACTS-Part A & B)

Problem in Picture Form (Pro-form)

March, Horner, Lewis-Palmer, Brown , Crone, Todd & Carr (2000) www.PBIS.org

tools and process @ ses
Tools and Process @ SES
  • Request for assistance form
  • FBA Interview: Meet with Core Team (homeroom teacher/social worker)
  • Meet with student and parent
  • ABC data collected
  • Formal Functional Behavioral Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plan
  • Informal- enough info/data (SWIS) to form hypothesis and run with plan
slide138

Jay

Axis I:

Mood Disorder, NOS

Attention Deficit w/ Hyperactivity

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Axis II: Developmental Learning

Disorder, NOS

  • BSR’s- Behavior Support Referrals
  • T.O.C.- Time Out of Class/hours
  • Maj OD- Oppositional Defiance
slide139

Alice

Handicapping Code: 14

Axis I: Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Depressive Disorder, NOS, Intermittent Explosive Disorder

BSR’s- Behavior Support Referrals

T.O.C.- Time Out of Class/hours

Skip- Refusing to Attend Class

slide140

Damien

Axis I: Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Attention Deficit w/ Hyperactivity

Axis II: Mild Mental Retardation

120

100

80

2003-04

60

2004-05

40

2005-06

20

0

BSR's

T.O.C.

Maj. P.A.

BSR’s

-

Behavior Support Referrals

T.O.C.

-

Time out of class/hours

Maj. P.A.

-

Major Physical Aggress

ion

collaboration
Collaboration
  • Kennedy Krieger Institute

NeuroBehavioral Outpatient Clinic and Inpatient Unit

  • Sheppard Pratt Health System

NeuroBehavioral Outpatient Clinic and Inpatient Unit

  • District Level Collaboration
references
References
  • Boehner, John. (2004). Strengthening and Renewing Special Education: The Improving Education Results for Children with Disabilities Act (H.R. 1350). House Education and Workforce Committee.
  • Dunlop, G., Hieneman, M., Knoster, T., Fox, L., Anderson, J., & Albin, R.W. (2000). Essential elements of in-service training in positive behavioral support. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 2 (I), 22-32.
  • Greenberg, Mark, T. (2003). Enhancing School-Based Prevention and Youth Development Through Coordinated Social, Emotional, and Academic Learning. American Psychologist..
  • Gresham, Frank M. (2003). Relevance of functional behavioral assessment research for school-based interventions and positive behavioral support. Research in Developmental Disabilities.
  • Hieneman, M. & Dunlap, G. (2000). Factors affecting the outcomes of community-based behavioral support: I. Identification and description of factor categories. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 2(3), 161-169, 178.
  • Knoster, T.P., Villa, R.A., & Thousand, J.S. (2000). A framework for thinking about systems change. In R.A. Villa & J.S. Thousand (Ed.S), Restructuring for caring and effective education:Piecing the puzzle together (pp. 93-128). Baltimore, Paul H. Brookes.
  • Maryland State Department of Education (2003). Maryland Institute (2003) Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports.
  • Prichard, E. Alice. Families and Positive Behavior Support: Addressing Problem Behavior in Family Contexts by Joseph M. Lucyshyn, Glen Dunlap and Richard W. Allen.. Journal on Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 11, No. 1.
recommended readings
Attwood, T. (1998). Asperger’s syndrome: A guide for parents and professional. Philadelphia, PA: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Klin, A., Volkmar, F. R. & Sparrow, S.S. (Editors). (2000). Asperger Syndrome. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

Greene, Ross W., Ph.D. (1998). The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, “Chronically Inflexible” Children., New York, NY: Harper Collins Publishers.

Wilens, Timothy E., MD., (1999). Straight Talk about Psychiatric Medication for Kids., New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

Crone, Deana A. and Horner, Robert H., (2003). Building Positive Behavior Support Systems in School: Functional Behavioral Assessment

Watson, Steuart,T.,and Steege, Mark W., (2003). Conducting School-Based Functional Behavioral Assessments: A practitioner’s guide

Recommended Readings