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Classical Rhetoric. By the time we’re through… It won’t be all Greek to you Maybe more like Latin . Exordium. The “Hook” or Attention Grabber E.g. A joke, a quote, a question, some striking statistics Employs persuasive appeal of ethos Establishes credibility with the audience.

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classical rhetoric
Classical Rhetoric
  • By the time we’re through…
  • It won’t be all Greek to you
  • Maybe more like Latin
exordium
Exordium
  • The “Hook” or Attention Grabber
  • E.g. A joke, a quote, a question, some striking statistics
  • Employs persuasive appeal of ethos
  • Establishes credibility with the audience
narratio
Narratio
  • Establishes background and authority
  • Typically 2-4 sentences following the exordium
  • Explains the “nature of the case”
divisio
Divisio
  • Commonly called the “thesis,” but more powerful than in the familiar Five Paragraph Essay
  • What you are analyzing and seeking to prove
  • This is where you take your stand
  • Typically the last sentence in the first or second paragraph, but can occur anywhere it is most effective
confirmatio
Confirmatio
  • Where you begin to build and solidify your case with:
  • Logical appeals to reason, logos
  • Research, specific examples, analysis
  • The main portion of

your essay

refutatio
Refutatio
  • Your counterargument
  • Acknowledges and addresses opposing views without resorting to logical fallacies to refute them
  • Can be one paragraph on its own or several interwoven throughout the confirmatio
peroratio
Peroratio
  • Links back to your exordium
  • Pulls your reader along to the conclusion
  • Ties your conclusion back to the flashy comment you started with, your “hook”
  • A summing up with an attention grabbing appeal to pathos, an appeal to the emotions