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CH 4: Applying the Contiguity Principle. When combining words and graphics together in an instructional material, it is important to place the printed words near corresponding graphics. 4 Common Violations of Contiguity Principle:.

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ch 4 applying the contiguity principle

CH 4: Applying the Contiguity Principle

When combining words and graphics together in an instructional material, it is important to place the printed words near corresponding graphics.

4 common violations of contiguity principle
4 Common Violations of Contiguity Principle:
  • Text and graphics separated and/or partially obscured due to scrolling screens
  • Feedback displayed in separate screen
  • Links to onscreen reference appear on a second browser covering related info on initial screen
  • Directions on how to complete an exercise appear on a separate screen from the exercise itself
cognitive overload
Cognitive Overload
  • The added work on the mind resulting from such violations of the Contiguity Principle would tax the limited capacity of the working memory, hence leading to “cognitive overload” (please refer to Adam Royalty’s presentation on this subject with rich imagery: http://ldt.stanford.edu/~aroyalty/ed391wk3/Chapter6Reviewhc.ppt#3)