ttt course day1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
TTT Course – Day1

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 82

TTT Course – Day1 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 365 Views
  • Uploaded on

TTT Course – Day1. Jim Petch Zagreb, January 28 th 2008. Schedule for Day 1. Introductions and scoping our work Drivers and driving principles for modern teaching and learning Quality assurance and enhancement Control of open/on-line learning. Activity 1. Scoping the work for the week.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'TTT Course – Day1' - Jimmy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
ttt course day1

TTT Course – Day1

Jim Petch

Zagreb, January 28th 2008

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

schedule for day 1
Schedule for Day 1
  • Introductions and scoping our work
  • Drivers and driving principles for modern teaching and learning
  • Quality assurance and enhancement
  • Control of open/on-line learning

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

activity 1
Activity 1.
  • Scoping the work for the week

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

activity 1 introductions
Activity 1 -Introductions
  • Who we are
  • Our roles
  • What we bring
  • What we expect to get out of the workshop
  • Negotiating a plan of work

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

drivers and driving principles
Drivers and Driving Principles
  • New technologies
  • Constructivist ideas of learning
  • Scaling up

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide7
Aspects of new situation with technologies
    • Access to resources
    • Communications
    • Social changes
    • Richness of media
    • Shift of power and control
    • Very rapid change

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide8
Risks of new situation
    • Different access – exclusion issue
    • Simple models of communication
    • New uncertain social orders
    • Poor use of media – quality issues
    • Plagiarism
    • IP issues
    • Risks of rapid change

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

key issue here
Key Issue here
  • We are presented with an image of the typical modern student who is connected, social, technically literate, cool etc etc
  • The situation is more complex
  • Reality is we have a wide range of students and of situations they are in
  • Ergo…..point if technology is not to fulfil a stereotype’s need but to meet a variety of needs

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide10
Constructivist model for on-line learning

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide11
DfES 5-year strategy for education and skills

Personalisation and choice

Flexibility and independence

The aims for a 21st century system…

Opening up services

Staff development

Collaborative partnerships

  • Personalise teaching and learning

will need the contributions ICT and e-learning can make, to…

  • Include the hard to reach groups
  • Open up a more flexible system
  • Improve productivity and effectiveness

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide12
Where will it get me?

How do we know I’ve learned?

How will I learn?

How could I study?

What can I learn?

Why should I learn?

The contribution of digital technologies to the learner’s journey

Personalised needs analysis

Access to information and guidance

Assessment when ready

Formative feedback

Progress files and e-portfolios

Adaptive, interactive learning environments

Adapting to learning style and pace

Personalised feedback and support

Partnerships offering flexible courses, modes, locations and patterns of study

Curriculum choice through partnerships

Provider flexibility and online support

Early years

School

Adult skills

HE

Personalised needs-benefits analysis

Links to informal learning opportunities

Access to advice and guidance

~ at any age

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide13

Theory Practice Policy

Where is research needed?

Personalised needs analysis

Access to information and guidance

Assessment when ready

Formative feedback

Progress files and e-portfolios

Adaptive, interactive learning environments

Adapting to learning needs

Personalised feedback and support

Partnerships offering flexible courses, modes, locations and patterns of study

Curriculum choice through partnerships

Provider flexibility and online support

Personalised needs-benefits analysis

Links to informal learning opportunities

Access to advice and guidance

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide14
Whatdoes theory tell us aboutactive learning?

Inquiry-based education

Constructivism

Mediated learning

Discovery learning

Learning as conversation

Problem-based learning

Reflective practice

Meta-cognition

Experiential learning

Learner-oriented approach

Social constructivism

Situated learning

Activity theory

  • Learners need to be
  • engaged in goal-oriented tasks
  • practising skills
  • exploring and interpreting
  • building and experimenting
  • using feedback to adapt actions
  • discussing what they do
  • reflecting on what happens
  • articulating what happens

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide15
Basic research is needed to use and develop theory on how digital tools and technologies can help the learner to
  • engage in goal-oriented tasks
  • practise skills
  • explore and interpret
  • build and experiment
  • use feedback to adapt actions
  • discuss what they do
  • reflect on what happens
  • articulate what happens

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide16
Scaling up (industrialisation)

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

four aspects of industrialisation
Four Aspects of Industrialisation
  • Process
  • Alignment
  • Quality
  • Maturity

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

industrialisation
Industrialisation
  • Primary Characteristics
    • Breakdown of processes
    • Division of roles
    • Process automation through Formalisation of protocols/procedures
    • Process automation using technology

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

activity 2
Activity 2
  • What’s new?
  • What’s different?
  • Challenges?
  • Risks and difficulties?
  • Your role?

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

quality assurance
Quality Assurance
  • Why at this stage?
  • …….know where you are heading….

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

two key studies
Two key studies
  • Quality on the Line
  • eMM – e-Learning maturity Model

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

quality on the line
Quality on the line
  • Benchmarks for Success
    • Institutional Support
    • Course Development
    • Teaching/Learning Process
    • Course Structure
    • Student Support
    • Faculty Support
    • Evaluation and Assessment

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

institutional support
Institutional Support
  • 1.Faculty are provided professional incentives for innovative practices to encourage development of distance learning courses.
  • 2. There are institutional rewards for the effective teaching of distance learning courses.
  • 3. A documented technology plan is in place to ensure quality standards.
  • 4. Electronic security measures are in place to ensure the integrity and validity of information.
  • 5. Support for building and maintaining the distance education infrastructure is addressed by a centralized system.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

course development
Course Development
  • 6. Distance learning course development must be approved through a broad peer review process.
  • 7. Guidelines exist regarding minimum standards for course development, design, and delivery.
  • 8. Course design is managed by teams comprised of faculty, content experts, instructional designers, technical experts, and evaluation personnel.
  • 9. During course development, the various learning styles of students are considered.
  • 10. Assessment instruments are used to ascertain the specific learning styles of students, which then determine the type of course delivery.
  • 11. Courses are designed with a consistent structure, easily discernable to students of varying learning styles.
  • 12. The technology being used to deliver course content is based on learning outcomes.
  • 13. Instructional materials are reviewed periodically to ensure they meet program standards.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

teaching learning process
Teaching/Learning Process
  • 14. Student interaction with faculty is facilitated through a variety of ways.
  • 15. Student interaction with other students is facilitated through a variety of ways.
  • 16. Feedback to student assignments and questions is provided in a timely manner.
  • 17. Feedback to students is provided in a manner that is constructive and non-threatening.
  • 18. Courses are separated into self-contained segments (modules) that can be used to assess student mastery before moving forward in the course or program.
  • 19. The modules/segments are of varying lengths determined by the complexity of learning outcomes.
  • 20. Each module/segment requires students to engage themselves in analysis, synthesis, and evaluation as part of their course assignments.
  • 21. Class voice-mail and/or e-mail systems are provided to encourage students to work with each other and their instructor(s).
  • 22. Course are designed to require students to work in groups utilizing problem-solving activities in order to develop topic understanding.
  • 23. Course materials promote collaboration among students.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

course structure
Course Structure
  • 24. Students are provided with supplemental course information that outlines course objectives, concepts, and ideas.
  • 25. Specific expectations are set for students with respect to a minimum amount of time per week for study and homework assignments.
  • 26. Faculty are required to grade and return all assignments within a certain time period.
  • 27. Sufficient library resources are made available to the students.
  • 28. Students are instructed in the proper methods of effective research, including assessment of resource validity.
  • 29. Before starting the program, students are advised about the program to determine if they have the self-motivation and commitment to learn at a distance.
  • 30. Learning outcomes for each course are summarized in a clearly written, straightforward statement.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

student support
Student Support
  • 31. Students can obtain assistance to help them use electronically accessed data successfully.
  • 32. Students are provided with hands-on training and information to aid them in securing material through electronic databases,interlibrary loans, government archives, news services, etc.
  • 33.Written information is supplied to the student about the program.
  • 34. Easily accessible technical assistance is available to all students throughout the duration of the course/program.
  • 35. A structured system is in place to address student complaints.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

faculty support
Faculty Support
  • 36. Technical assistance in course development is available to faculty and they are encouraged to use it.
  • 37. Faculty members are assisted in the transition from classroom teaching to distance instruction and are assessed in the process.
  • 38. There are peer mentoring resources available to faculty members teaching distance courses.
  • 39. Distance instructor training continues throughout the progression of the online class.
  • 40. Faculty members are provided with written resources to deal with issues arising from student use of electronically-accessed data.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

evaluation and assessment
Evaluation and Assessment
  • 41. The program’s educational effectiveness is measured using several methods.
  • 42. An evaluation process is used to improve the teaching/learning process.
  • 43. Specific standards are in place to compare and improve learning outcomes.
  • 44. Data on enrolment, costs, and successful/innovative uses of technology are used to evaluate program effectiveness.
  • 45. Intended learning outcomes are regularly reviewed to ensure clarity, utility, and appropriateness.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide32
eMM
  • The e-Learning Maturity Model

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

e learning capability maturity model emm categories or process areas
E-Learning Capability Maturity Model- eMM:Categories or Process Areas

Stephen Marshall, Victoria University of Wellington (2006):

“The key concept is that the ability of an organisation to be effective in a particular area of work is dependent on their capability to engage in high quality, reproducible, processes that can be sustained and built upon”

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

capability maturity model
Capability Maturity Model

A process improvement approach that provides organizations with the essential elements of effective processes. It can be used to guide process improvement across a project, a division, or an entire organization. CMMI helps integrate traditionally separate organizational functions, set process improvement goals and priorities, provide guidance for quality processes, and provide a point of reference for appraising current processes.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

emm model
eMM Model

List of 35 processes in 5 process areas:

  • Learning
  • Development
  • Support
  • Evaluation
  • Organisation

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

emm model36
Rating

Rating

Meaning

Meaning

Not practiced/not adequate

Not practiced/not adequate

Partially adequate

Partially adequate

Largely adequate

Largely adequate

Fully adequate

Fully adequate

Not assessed

Not assessed

eMM Model
  • Capability measured in five dimensions for each process
  • Capability described as shown
  • Capability determined by assessment of practice
  • Practice determined through analysis of evidence

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide37
University of Manchester- pilot results

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

process category brief description
Process category Brief description
  • Learning Processes that directly impact on pedagogical aspects of e-learning
  • Development Processes surrounding the creation and maintenance of e-learning resources
  • Support Processes surrounding the support and operational management of e-learning
  • Evaluation Processes surrounding the evaluation and quality control of e-learning through its entire lifecycle.
  • Organisation Processes associated with institutional planning and management

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

learning processes that directly impact on pedagogical aspects of e learning
Learning: Processes that directly impact on pedagogical aspects of e-learning
  • L1. Learning objectives are apparent in the design and implementation of courses
  • L2. Students are provided with mechanisms for interaction with teaching staff and other students
  • L3. Student skill development for learning is provided
  • L4. Information provided on the type and timeliness of staff responses to communications students can expect
  • L5. Students receive feedback on their performance within courses
  • L6. Research and information literacy skills development by students is explicitly supported
  • L7. Learning designs and activities result in active engagement by students
  • L8. Assessment of students is designed to progressively build their competence
  • L9. Student work is subject to specified timetables and deadlines
  • L10. Courses are designed to support diverse learning styles and learner capabilities

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

development processes surrounding the creation and maintenance of e learning resources
Development: Processes surrounding the creation and maintenance of e-learning resources
  • D1. Teaching staff are provided with design and development support when engaging in e-learning
  • D2. Explicit institutional procedures and standards guide course development, design, and delivery
  • D3. Explicit linkages are made in the design rationale regarding the pedagogies, content and technologies chosen
  • D4. Courses are designed to support disabled students
  • D5. All elements of the physical e-learning infrastructure are reliable and robust
  • D6. All elements of the physical e-learning infrastructure are integrated using defined standards
  • D7. Resources created are designed to maximise reuse

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

support processes surrounding the support and operational management of e learning
Support: Processes surrounding the support and operational management of e-learning
  • S1. Students are provided with technical assistance when engaging in e-learning
  • S2. Students have access to a range of library resources and services when engaging in e-learning
  • S3. Student enquiries, questions, and complaints are collected formally
  • S4. Students have access to support services for personal and learning issues when engaging in e-learning
  • S5. Teaching staff are provided with pedagogical support and professional development in using e-learning
  • S6. Teaching staff are provided with technical support in the handling of electronic materials created by students

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide43
Evaluation: Processes surrounding the evaluation and quality control of e-learning through its entirelifecycle
  • E1. Students are able to provide regular formal and informal feedback on the quality and effectiveness of their e-learning experience
  • E2. Teaching staff are able to provide regular formal and informal feedback on quality and effectiveness of their e-learning experience
  • E3. Regular formal external reviews of e-learning aspects of courses are conducted

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

organisation processes associated with institutional planning and management
Organisation: Processes associated with institutional planning and management
  • O1. Formal criteria used to allocate resources for e-learning design and development
  • O2. Institutional learning and teaching policy and strategy explicitly address e-learning
  • O3. A documented plan guides technology decisions when designing and developing courses
  • O4. A documented plan ensures the reliability, integrity, and validity of information collection, storage, and retrieval
  • O5. E-learning courses are placed within an explicit plan for programme completion by students
  • O6. E-learning procedures and which technologies are used are communicated to students prior to starting courses
  • O7. Pedagogical rationale for e-learning approaches and technologies communicated to students prior to starting courses
  • O8. Course administration information communicated to students prior to starting courses

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

activity 3
Activity 3
  • Key quality issues

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

control of open learning
Control of Open Learning
  • Context
    • Approach to redesign
    • Models of learning
    • Cognitive styles
  • Control mechanisms through design
    • Learning objects
    • Constructive alignment
    • Knowledge mapping
    • Feedback and support systems
    • Achieving ‘flow’

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

models of approach
Models of Approach
  • Work of Carol Twigg and associates in

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

twigg
Twigg
  • Principle #1: Redesign the whole course.
  • Principle #2: Encourage active learning
  • Principle #3: Provide students with individualized assistance.
  • Principle #4: Build in ongoing assessment and prompt (automated) feedback.
  • Principle #5: Ensure sufficient time on task and monitor student progress

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

five models for course redesign twigg
FIVE MODELS FOR COURSE REDESIGN (Twigg)
  • SUPPLEMENTAL MODEL
  • REPLACEMENT MODEL
  • EMPORIUM MODEL
  • ONLINE MODEL
  • BUFFET MODEL

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

course structures
Course structures
  • Linear Delivery
    • Good for describing a narrative (eg PowerPoint slides) or a process and for leading the user didactically through the material.
    • Make sure that the linearity is obvious (eg by a numbering system) and that users can go back and forward and see the complete index, otherwise it can seem like a 'forced march'.
  • Semantic net
    • Hypertext linking can be useful in presenting alternative routes to information (index pages, concept maps), but too much can disorientate the user - they get 'lost in hyperspace'.
    • Be careful with too much off-site linking, especially within paragraphs of text - you may lose your audience before they get to the end of what you have to say. It may be better to group links in a separate bibliography.
  • Discussion
    • a discussion-focused design is built around on online discussion-based activities.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

models of learning
Models of Learning
  • Objectivist vs constructivist

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide53
A. Behavioral Psychology & the Objectivism Model fromUNCBehavioral Psychology (B.F. Skinner): a. Psychology is based on observable behavior b. Behavior is determined by outcomes/consequences c. Knowledge is manifested in behavior (correct answers)Objectivist Teaching/Learning Method assumes:a. Content presentation b. Question is put to student c. Student is told if answer is right d. Positive reinforcement for right answers e. Cycle is repeated for wrong answersf. External truths and knowledge exists for learners to memorize g. Teacher control h. Students learn meaning

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide54
B. Cognitive Psychology & the Constructivism Model fromUNCLearner as active processor of information(computer based model). Emphasis on internal mental states Considers perspective and knowledge of student. Constructivism (Active learning, Adult learning)Methods vary: a. Encourage knowledge formation b. Process is different for each student c. Self-directed exploration d. Discovery learning e. Construction of concepts, schema andmental modelsf. Truth and knowledge is constructed by studentsbased on perspective and experience g. Teacher observes, coaches and facilitates h. Students create meaning

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

cognitive styles established models
Cognitive styles – established models
  • field independence-dependence
  • holist-analytic
  • sensory preferences
  • hemispheric preferences
  • Kolb’s learning style model

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

field independence dependence
Field independence-dependence
  • the ability to distinguish key elements from a distracting or confusing background.
  • field independent people tend to be more autonomous in relation to the development of cognitive restructuring skills and less autonomous in relation to the development of interpersonal skills.
  • field dependent people tend to be more autonomous in relation to the development of high interpersonal skills and less autonomous in relation to the development of cognitive restructuring skills.
  • field independent persons tend to be intrinsically motivated and enjoy individualized learning, while field dependent ones tend to be extrinsically motivated and enjoy cooperative learning.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

holist analytic
holist-analytic
  • learning styles have two basic types of independent dimensions.
  • One is the holist-analytic dimension. The holists tend to view a situation as a whole, while the analytics tend to view a situation as a collection of parts and often stress only one or two aspects at a time. Intermediates will have the advantage of both styles.
  • The other is the verbal-imagery dimension, which has two basic effects: (a) how information is represented, such as verbally, imagery, or both, as well as (b) internal/external focus of attention. Generally, the imagers tend to be internal and passive, while the verbalizers tend to be external and stimulating.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

sensory preferences
sensory preferences
  • the imagers are better in performance than the verbalizers in the text-plus-picture condition,
  • the verbalizers are better than the imagers in the text-plus-text conditions.
  • the imagers more often use diagrams to illustrate their answers than the verbalizers.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

hemispheric preferences
Left Brain

LogicalSequentialRationalAnalyticalObjectiveLooks at the parts

Right Brain

IntuitiveRandomHolisticSynthesisingSubjectiveLooks at the whole

hemispheric preferences

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

kolb s learning style model
Kolb’s learning style model

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide63
Design and redesign challenges of Moving on-line
      • Granular materials – how to granularise a curriculum?
      • Self directed learning – how to present, writing issues
      • How to manage groups and individuals
      • Communication and support
      • Rich materials/media – how to design use of rich materials
      • Achieving the ‘dynamic’
      • Quality assurance

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

some general principles
Some general principles

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

arthur w chickering and zelda f gamson 1987
Arthur W. Chickering and Zelda F. Gamson (1987)

"Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education" American Association of Higher Education Bulletin pp.3-7

  • Encourage contacts between students and faculty.
  • Develop reciprocity and cooperation among students.
  • Use active learning techniques.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Emphasize time on task.
  • Communicate high expectations.
  • Respect diverse talents and ways of learning.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

pelz s principles of on line pedagogy best of sloan
Pelz’s principles of on-line pedagogy (Best of Sloan)
  • Principle #1: Let the students do (most of) the work.
  • Principle #2: Interactivity is the heart and soul of effective asynchronous learning.
  • Principle #3: Strive for presence.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

learning objects
Learning Objects
  • All things to all people

My ‘useful’ definition

  • 5 elements
    • Context
    • ILO
    • Material
    • Activity
    • Assessment

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

writing for on line and open learning
Writing for On-line and Open Learning
  • Be personal – write conversationally (it is a conversation not mere information transfer)
  • Write short tight paragraphs
  • Chunk information in to bite size pieces
  • Focus on key aspects – use headlines and highlights (pages are scanned not read)
  • Open with key issues – most people focus on the first part of a page

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

constructive alignment
Constructive alignment

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

knowledge and task analysis
Knowledge and Task Analysis

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

task structure precedence chart
Task structure (Precedence Chart)

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

feedback and support systems
Feedback and support systems

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

achieving the dynamic flow
Achieving the dynamic -Flow
  • Flow is the mental state of operation in which the person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing, characterized by a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and success in the process of the activity. Proposed by psychologist Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, the concept has been widely referenced across a variety of fields.
  • Colloquial terms for this or similar mental states include: to be on the ball, in the zone, or in the groove.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

slide76
Csíkszentmihályi described flow as "being completely involved in an activity for its own sake. The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement, and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz. Your whole being is involved, and you're using your skills to the utmostTo achieve a flow state, a balance must be struck between the challenge of the task and the skill of the performer. If the task is too easy or too difficult, flow cannot occur.
  • The flow state also implies a kind of focused attention, and indeed, it has been noted that mindfulness meditation, yoga, and martial arts seem to improve a person's capacity for flow. Among other benefits, all of these activities train and improve attention.
  • In short; flow could be described as a state where attention, motivation, and the situation meet, resulting in a kind of productive harmony or feedback.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

achieving flow
Achieving ‘flow’

Csíkszentmihályi identifies the following as accompanying an experience of flow:

  • Clear goals (expectations and rules are discernible and goals are attainable and align appropriately with one's skill set and abilities).
  • Concentrating and focusing, a high degree of concentration on a limited field of attention (a person engaged in the activity will have the opportunity to focus and to delve deeply into it).
  • A loss of the feeling of self-consciousness, the merging of action and awareness.
  • Distorted sense of time, one's subjective experience of time is altered.
  • Direct and immediate feedback (successes and failures in the course of the activity are apparent, so that behavior can be adjusted as needed).
  • Balance between ability level and challenge (the activity is neither too easy nor too difficult).
  • A sense of personal control over the situation or activity.
  • The activity is intrinsically rewarding, so there is an effortlessness of action.
  • People become absorbed in their activity, and focus of awareness is narrowed down to the activity itself, action awareness merging
  • Not all are needed for flow to be experienced

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

activity 4
Activity 4
  • Putting it all together
  • Identifying main tasks
  • Putting them in to a workflow
  • Sequence and dependencies
  • Single model?

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

evaluation
Evaluation
  • Fundamental principle of evaluation
  • Where, when, how?
  • Our evaluation.

Geographic Information Science and Technology in Croatian Higher Education

ad