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I Am An Abolitionist

I Am An Abolitionist

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I Am An Abolitionist

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  1. I Am An Abolitionist

  2. What is an abolitionist ? • One who works to abolish schools. • One who works to abolish fat. • One who works to abolish slavery.

  3. If you selected choice # 3 You are correct!!!! An abolitionist is someone who works to abolish slavery.

  4. What do you know about the Abolitionist Movement ? Okay, check this out.

  5. Facts on the Abolitionist Movement • Most abolitionists were white. • Quakers were the first to speak out against slavery. • Most abolitionists lived in New England. • Free African Americans joined the movement. • Former enslaved African Americans joined. • They worked to bring an end to slavery by publicizing its evils.

  6. More facts • Through their newspapers, books, and speaking tours, they worked to influence public opinion against slavery. • Dec. 4, 1833 the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) met in Philadelphia. • They met for 3 days and developed a plan of action.

  7. The AASS called for immediate abolition of slavery and the elevation of the condition of African Americans.

  8. More facts……..…Important Abolitionists • William Lloyd Garrison • James Forten • Frederick Douglass • Sojurner Truth • Angelina and Sarah Grimke • Harriet Tubman • Harriet Beecher Stowe

  9. More Abolitionist • John Greenleaf Whittier • Elijah P. Lovejoy Okay, Okay…..I’ll stop with the list. Let’s focus on 3 individuals from the list.

  10. William Lloyd Garrison • Joined the abolitionist movement at the age of 25. • He fought against slavery for 35 years. • Published his anti-slavery newspaper “Liberator” for 20 years. • He called for the immediate end to slavery.

  11. Garrison continued… • He was one of the most controversial and outspoken leaders of the movement. • Next, Frederick Douglass

  12. Frederick Douglass • Born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey. • Taught to read and write by his slave masters mistress. • Escaped slavery at the age of 20. • Became one of the most important African American leaders of his time. • Published an anti-slavery newspaper called The North Star.

  13. Douglass continued….. • His public speaking skills impressed the AASS so, that they asked him to give regular lectures. • He called for justice for all oppressed people regardless of their race, nationally, or sex. • Instrumental in the changing of the U.S. government policy on allowing African Americans into the armed forces during the Civil War. Thirdly, the Grimke Sisters

  14. Angelina and Sarah Grimke • Born into a wealthy slaveholding family in Charleston, SC. • Rejected their parents’ view of slavery and moved North to support the abolition movement. • They became the first female members of the AASS. • They were criticized for their willingness to speak out against slavery by people who believed women should not speak out in public.

  15. Angelina and Sarah continued.. • In 1836, Angelina wrote the “Appeal to Christian Women of the South, ” it was her attempt to bring other women into the movement. • Also in 1836, Sarah wrote the “An Epistle to the Clergy of the Southern States.” • Their powerful works had a huge impact on the South because it was the first time such works had been written by southerners for southerners.

  16. Now you know something about the Abolitionist Movement • Check out the following websites to learn even more. • http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african/afam005.html • http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/links/slave.htm

  17. It is enough for me…..that every yoke is broken, and every bondmen is set free. William Lloyd Garrison 1865

  18. Works Cited • Middleton, Stephen and Stokes,Charlotte.TheAfrican American Experience: A History. Globe Fearon, Inc.:New Jersey • http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/home.html • http://www.biography-center.com