ERGONOMICS in the LABORATORY - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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    1. ERGONOMICS in the LABORATORY Designing jobs, equipment, and work tasks to fit human physical characteristics and energy limitations. Ergonomics considers body dimensions, mobility, and the bodys stress behavior Make the work fit the person, not the person fit the work. GOAL OF ERGONOMICS Finding ways to make strenuous, often repetitive work, less likely to prevent muscle and joint injuries -- and still get the job done. Designing jobs, equipment, and work tasks to fit human physical characteristics and energy limitations. Ergonomics considers body dimensions, mobility, and the bodys stress behavior Make the work fit the person, not the person fit the work. GOAL OF ERGONOMICS Finding ways to make strenuous, often repetitive work, less likely to prevent muscle and joint injuries -- and still get the job done.

    2. Common Musculoskeletal Disorders Tendonitis (also Tendinitis). Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). Medial epicondylitis (golfer's elbow). Tenosynovitis. Stenosing tenosynovitis of the finger (trigger finger). de Quervain's disease. (thumb gripping) Raynaud's phenomenon (white finger or vibration syndrome). Thoracic outlet syndrome (pain in neck, arm, hand Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (enflamed/ compressed medial nerve) Back Strain/Sprain Common Musculoskeletal Disorders Tendonitis (also Tendinitis). Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). Medial epicondylitis (golfer's elbow). Tenosynovitis. Stenosing tenosynovitis of the finger (trigger finger). de Quervain's disease. (thumb gripping) Raynaud's phenomenon (white finger or vibration syndrome). Thoracic outlet syndrome (pain in neck, arm, hand Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (enflamed/ compressed medial nerve) Back Strain/Sprain

    3. Ergonomic Assessment The following slides provide information intended to help you identify potential risk factors and to give you ideas to help improve the ergonomics of your work activities. Use the ergonomic assessment form provided on the website to guide your through assessing and improving your work activities. http://www.montana.edu/wellness/wellAwards.html

    4. Ergonomic Assessment Additional Benefits: Improve comfort Decrease fatigue Enhance job satisfaction Increase productivity Extend work life Protect enjoyment of many life activities

    5. Key Risk Factors Awkward posture refers to positions of the body (e.g., limbs, joints, back) that deviate significantly from the neutral position while job tasks are performed, thereby increasing the risk of injury. The greater the deviation from neutral, the greater the risk of injury. Awkward postures increase the exertion and muscle force required to perform the task and compress soft tissues like nerves, tendons, and blood vessels. Force refers to the physical effort needed to accomplish a motion or task. Force also refers to the degree of loading to muscles and other tissues, such as the additional physical effort that may be needed to perform tasks at increased speed or in an awkward posture. Tasks or motions that require application of higher forces place higher mechanical loads on muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints. Repetition is the frequency at which a motion or task is repeated with little variation in movement. The risk of WMSDs due to repetition is increased when combined with force, awkward postures, acceleration and velocity. Contact stress results from continuous contact between a hard object and sensitive tissues. Force and repetition combine to produce mechanical friction on soft tissue and tendons that is increased when forceful exertion is used, such as the firm grip which is often needed when applying a tip onto a pipette. Awkward posture refers to positions of the body (e.g., limbs, joints, back) that deviate significantly from the neutral position while job tasks are performed, thereby increasing the risk of injury. The greater the deviation from neutral, the greater the risk of injury. Awkward postures increase the exertion and muscle force required to perform the task and compress soft tissues like nerves, tendons, and blood vessels. Force refers to the physical effort needed to accomplish a motion or task. Force also refers to the degree of loading to muscles and other tissues, such as the additional physical effort that may be needed to perform tasks at increased speed or in an awkward posture. Tasks or motions that require application of higher forces place higher mechanical loads on muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints. Repetition is the frequency at which a motion or task is repeated with little variation in movement. The risk of WMSDs due to repetition is increased when combined with force, awkward postures, acceleration and velocity. Contact stress results from continuous contact between a hard object and sensitive tissues. Force and repetition combine to produce mechanical friction on soft tissue and tendons that is increased when forceful exertion is used, such as the firm grip which is often needed when applying a tip onto a pipette.

    6. Risk Factors

    7. Minimize Risk Factors

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    14. Adjust Your Chair Adjust your chair to achieve a neutral position keep trying, it is an ongoing process! Fix (or have fixed) a malfunctioning chair Use a lumbar cushion for additional support or if chair lacks adequate back support or seat is too deep Pad armrests that are hard or that have square edges Remove armrests if they contribute to awkward postures Use a foot rest or keyboard platform to help achieve neutral position if necessary

    15. Minimize Awkward Body Position

    20. When Using Input Devices (Keyboard, mouse, etc.)

    25. High Force Using a lot of hand force increases the risk for hand, wrist and elbow injuries, and in some cases shoulder injuries. Holding something between the tips of the fingers and the thumb is called a pinch grip. This type of grip uses very small muscles in the hand and wrist, so even holding something that weighs only 2 pounds can be a risk for injury if its done for extended periods per day. Because you cant get as good a grip with your fingertips as with your whole hand, you tend to use more force to hold onto something than just the weight of the object. For example, in order to hold onto a stack of paper that weighs two pounds, you actually have to use four pounds of grip force. When you grip something with your whole hand youre able to use the larger muscles in your forearm, and this gives you a grip thats five times stronger than a pinch grip. Youre also able to get a better grip so the amount of grip force you use is pretty much equal to the weight of the object youre holding. Therefore, grip force of 10 or more pounds of weight held or 10 or more pounds of force exerted for extended periods per day are also cautionary activities. Using a lot of hand force increases the risk for hand, wrist and elbow injuries, and in some cases shoulder injuries. Holding something between the tips of the fingers and the thumb is called a pinch grip. This type of grip uses very small muscles in the hand and wrist, so even holding something that weighs only 2 pounds can be a risk for injury if its done for extended periods per day. Because you cant get as good a grip with your fingertips as with your whole hand, you tend to use more force to hold onto something than just the weight of the object. For example, in order to hold onto a stack of paper that weighs two pounds, you actually have to use four pounds of grip force. When you grip something with your whole hand youre able to use the larger muscles in your forearm, and this gives you a grip thats five times stronger than a pinch grip. Youre also able to get a better grip so the amount of grip force you use is pretty much equal to the weight of the object youre holding. Therefore, grip force of 10 or more pounds of weight held or 10 or more pounds of force exerted for extended periods per day are also cautionary activities.

    26. Eliminate awkward positions Use mechanical advantage Reduce weight of tool or object Redesign tool/user interface Use sharp, well-maintained tools Alternate Positions/Tasks Avoid resting your wrists against a desk edge Look at Material Handling Alternatives

    28. Time Frequency, Duration & Recovery

    29. Numbness Burning Pain/Aching Tingling Cramping Stiffness Physical Symptoms

    30. Early Intervention is Critical E arly R esponse G ains O pportunity

    32. Use the ergonomic assessment form provided on the webpage to guide you through a self-assessment of your work activities. http://www.montana.edu/wellness/wellAwards.html

    33. Consult additional resources on this website. Contact your Wellness Coordinator for additional assistance and resources