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Introduction to Computer Graphics CS 445 / 645. Lecture 3 General Graphics Systems. Daniel Rozin, Wooden Mirror (1999). Announcement Assignment 1 (Fire Truck) is out Due Feb 3 rd Overview – Read Chapter 2 and Appendix A1-A5 Display devices Graphics hardware Input devices

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Introduction to Computer Graphics CS 445 / 645


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    1. Introduction to Computer GraphicsCS 445 / 645 Lecture 3 General Graphics Systems Daniel Rozin, Wooden Mirror (1999)

    2. Announcement • Assignment 1 (Fire Truck) is out • Due Feb 3rd • Overview – Read Chapter 2 and Appendix A1-A5 • Display devices • Graphics hardware • Input devices • Graphics Software

    3. Review • CRTs • Vector based • Raster based • Interlacing

    4. Review • Vector vs. Raster • Another place we see this… web-based graphics • Macromedia flash is vector based • JPG images are raster based So what… • Time to transmit vs. time to generate • Bandwidth vs. CPU • Reuse of image description

    5. Vector Graphics • How to generate an image using vectors • A line is represented by endpoints (10,10) to (90,90) • The points along the line are computed using a line equation • y = mx + b • If you want the image larger, no problem… Cheap transmission Computation required

    6. Raster Graphics • How to generate a line using rasters • A line is represented by assigning some pixels a value of 1 • The entire line is specified by the pixel values • What do we do to make image larger? Lot’s of extra info to communicate No computation

    7. Display Technology: LCDs • Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) • LCDs: organic molecules, naturally in crystalline state, that liquefy when excited by heat or E field • Crystalline state twists polarized light 90º.

    8. Display Technology: LCDs • Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) • LCDs: organic molecules, naturally in crystalline state, that liquefy when excited by heat or E field • Crystalline state twists polarized light 90º

    9. Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) Figure 2.16 from Hearn and Baker

    10. Display Technology: DMD / DLP • Digital Micromirror Devices (projectors) or Digital Light Processing • Microelectromechanical (MEM) devices, fabricated with VLSI techniques

    11. Display Technology: DMD / DLP • DMDs are truly digital pixels • Vary grey levels by modulating pulse length • Color: multiple chips, or color-wheel • Great resolution • Very bright • Flicker problems

    12. Display Technologies: Organic LED Arrays • Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Arrays • The display of the future? Many think so. • OLEDs function like regular semiconductor LEDs • But they emit light • Thin-film deposition of organic, light-emitting molecules through vapor sublimation in a vacuum. • Dope emissive layers with fluorescent molecules to create color. http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/specialProducts/OEL/creating.jhtml

    13. Display Technologies: Organic LED Arrays • OLED pros: • Transparent • Flexible • Light-emitting, and quite bright (daylight visible) • Large viewing angle • Fast (< 1 microsecond off-on-off) • Can be made large or small • Available for cell phones and car stereos

    14. Display Technologies: Organic LED Arrays • OLED cons: • Not very robust, display lifetime a key issue • Currently only passive matrix displays • Passive matrix: Pixels are illuminated in scanline order (like a raster display), but the lack of phospherescence causes flicker • Active matrix: A polysilicate layer provides thin film transistors at each pixel, allowing direct pixel access and constant illumination See http://www.howstuffworks.com/lcd4.htm for more info

    15. Additional Displays • Display Walls • Princeton • Stanford • UVa – Greg Humphreys

    16. Display Wall Alignment

    17. Additional Displays • Stereo

    18. Interfaces • What is spatial dimensionality of computer screen? • What is dimensionality of mouse input? • How many degrees of freedom (DOFs) define the position of your hand in space? • Space ball

    19. Video Controllers • Graphics Hardware • Frame buffer is anywherein system memory Frame buffer Cartesian Coordinates CPU System Memory Video Controller Monitor System Bus

    20. Video Controllers • Graphics Hardware • Permanent place forframe buffer • Direct connection tovideo controller Frame buffer Cartesian Coordinates CPU System Memory Frame Buffer Video Controller Monitor System Bus

    21. Video Controllers • The need for synchronization CPU System Memory Frame Buffer Video Controller Monitor synchronized System Bus

    22. Video Controllers current previous • The need for synchronization • Double buffering CPU System Memory Double Buffer Video Controller Monitor synchronized System Bus

    23. I/O Devices System Bus Display Processor CPU System Memory Video Controller Frame Buffer Monitor Raster Graphics Systems Figure 2.29 from Hearn and Baker

    24. Frame Buffer Frame Buffer Figure 1.2 from Foley et al.

    25. Frame Buffer Refresh Refresh rate is usually 30-75Hz Figure 1.3 from FvDFH

    26. Direct Color Framebuffer • Store the actual intensities of R, G, and B individually in the framebuffer • 24 bits per pixel = 8 bits red, 8 bits green, 8 bits blue • 16 bits per pixel = ? bits red, ? bits green, ? bits blue DAC

    27. Color Lookup Framebuffer • Store indices (usually 8 bits) in framebuffer • Display controller looks up the R,G,B values before triggering the electron guns Color Lookup Table 0 DAC 14 Pixel color = 14 R G B Frame Buffer 1024

    28. Software • Hide the details • User should not need to worry about how graphics are displayed on monitor • User doesn’t need to know about how a line is converted into pixels and drawn on screen (hardware dependent) • User doesn’t need to rebuild the basic tools of a 3D scene • Virtual camera, light sources, polygon drawing • OpenGL does this for you…

    29. Software • Hide the details • User doesn’t need to know how to read the data coming from the mouse • User doesn’t need to know how to read the keystrokes • OpenGL Utility Toolkit (GLUT) does this for you…

    30. Software • Hide the details • User doesn’t have to build a graphical user interface (GUI) • Pull-down menus, scrollbars, file loaders • Fast Light Toolkit (FLTK) does this for you…

    31. Software • Hide the details • User shouldn’t have to write code to create a GUI • Positioning text boxes, buttons, scrollbars • Use a graphical tool to arrange visually • Assign callback functions to hook into source code • Fast Light User Interface Designer (FLUID) does this for you…

    32. OpenGL Design Goals • SGI’s design goals for OpenGL: • High-performance (hardware-accelerated) graphics API • Some hardware independence • Natural, terse API with some built-in extensibility • OpenGL has become a standard (competing with DirectX) because: • It doesn’t try to do too much • Only renders the image, doesn’t manage windows, etc. • No high-level animation, modeling, sound (!), etc. • It does enough • Useful rendering effects + high performance • Open source and promoted by SGI (& Microsoft, half-heartedly)

    33. The Big Picture • Who gets control of the main control loop? • FLTK – the code that waits for user input and processes it • Must be responsive to user… do as I say • GLUT – the code that controls the window and refresh • Must be responsive to windowing system and OS • OpenGL – the code that controls what is drawn • Must be responsive to the program that specifies where objects are located. If something moves, I want to see it.

    34. The Big Picture • Who gets control of the main control loop? • Answer: FLTK • We’ll try to hide the details from you for now • But be aware of the conflict that exists • FLTK must be aware of GLUT and OpenGL state at all times • Must give code compute cycles when needed • We’ll discuss OpenGL as if it were standalone

    35. Review • Read Chapter 2 • Read Appendix 1 – 5 (for next week) • Implement OpenGL • Section 2.9 is good introduction to OpenGL