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Transport and Kyoto Protocol Consumer information FRANK VAN WEST FIA Foundation Gas Natural Foundation Bilbao, 16 December 2004 CONTENT: EU strategy on CO2 emissions from cars Kyoto Agreement EU Monitoring scheme + Results Agreement EU Commission and car industry

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Transport and Kyoto Protocol

Consumer information

FRANK VAN WEST

FIA Foundation

Gas Natural Foundation

Bilbao, 16 December 2004

slide2

CONTENT:

  • EU strategy on CO2 emissions from cars
  • Kyoto Agreement
  • EU Monitoring scheme + Results
  • Agreement EU Commission and car industry
  • EU Consumer information scheme
  • How can FIA clubs inform the consumer?
  • Eco Test
  • Conclusions
slide3

EU Strategy

The EU’s aim:

by 2010 at the latest

an average CO2 emission figure of 120 g/km (app. 5 l /100km petrol and 4.5 l/100 km diesel) for all new passenger cars marketed in the Union.

slide4

The objective is to be achieved by three instruments:

  • Agreements committing the automobile manufacturers to reduce CO2 emissions from passenger cars mainly by means of improved vehicle technology
slide5

Instruments

2) Market-orientated measures to influence motorists’ choice towards more fuel- efficient cars

(fiscal framework measurements)

3) Improvements of consumer information on the fuel-economy of cars

slide6

Kyoto Agreement of 10 December 1997:

The reduction in emissions of six greenhouse gases, including CO2, at 8% relative to 1990 levels by 2008-2012.

slide7

EU Monitoring scheme

Decision of EP and Council establishes a scheme to monitor the average specific emissions of CO2 produced on the territory of the Member States by new cars.

slide8

Passenger car contribution

CO2 emissions from passenger cars account for approximately 50% of total CO2 emissions in the transport sector and 12% of total CO2 emissions in EU (15)

slide10

Member States must:

Collect the vehicle information needed for the monitoring scheme

Communicate to the Commission annually:

For each fuel type , mass category, engine power and engine capacity

the number of newly registered passenger cars and the average specific emissions of CO2 of those cars

slide11

ACEA average CO2 emissions (fuel consumption) petrol and diesel passenger cars

CO2g/km

Source: EU Commission Feb.04

slide12

JAMA average CO2 emissions (fuel consumption) petrol and diesel passenger cars

CO2g/km

Source: EU Commission Feb.04

slide13

KAMA average CO2 emissions (fuel consumption) petrol and diesel passenger cars

CO2g/km

Source: EU Commission Feb.04

slide14

EU-15 average CO2 emissions (fuel consumption) petrol, diesel and total(petrol + diesel) of passenger cars

CO2g/km

Source: EU Commission Feb.04

slide15

NUMBER OF PURCHASED DIESEL PASSENGER CARS 2003

Total: 6.2 million

X 1000

Source: RAI (NL)

slide17

Agreement Commission and car industry:

140 gr/km CO2 (5.85 l petrol/100 km and 5.22 l diesel/100 km)

ACEA 2008

JAMA 2009

KAMA 2009

The EU Commission is studying ACEA and JAMA reports on studies reviewing their position after 2009

slide18

Consumer information system (1999/94/EC)

  • labelling of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions
  • the production of a fuel consumption and CO2 emissions guide
  • displaying posters in car showrooms
  • the inclusion of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions data in advertising, brochures, etc.
slide19

In the EU we have:

  • a single market
  • a single currency
  • a harmonised fuel labelling Directive
  • citizens (consumers) who have been asked to learn thinking European wide

HOWEVER

slide20

Despite a harmonised fuel labelling Directive there is:

unfortunately no harmonised calculation method for comparing cars inside a vehicle category because member states could not get to an agreement in Brussels for a harmonised relative system

ATTENTION : THE DIRECTIVE IS MEANT TO BETTER INFORM THE CONSUMER !!

slide21

As a consequence some member states have the same format of labels with different coloured arrows for equivalent cars based on different calculation systems, others have different labels

Germany distribute absolute figures only

THIS IS CONFUSING FOR CONSUMERS !

slide22

Danish Energy Label

Euro NCAP information

slide24

Reactions on different calculation systems:

Manufacturers, importers and dealers:

“Some systems are so complicated that they are hardly explainable to consumers”

Consumers:

In general hardly interested

Only in cars that are subsidized (costs)

slide25

Experience:

Fuel economy and environmental impact are in general no major factor in vehicle purchase decisions

Fuel consumption is mostly only important because of the cost, but not to environmental issues

Consumers are not well aware of fuel economy and environmental issues. Interest is growing slowly with greater awareness of climate change and CO2 emission issues

slide26

How can automobile clubs inform their members on CO2 , fuel consumption and climate change ?

Brochures

Articles in club magazines

Individual member information

Good Internet websites

Driver training

slide27

What information should automobile clubs give their members ?

Generalinformation on CO2 and Global Warming

Give hints for less environmental damage

Promote gear shift indicators

Eco Test

slide29

Hints

  • short journeys: bicycle, public transport, walk
  • drive-off after cranking a.s.a.p.
  • try to avoid harsh acceleration and heavy braking
  • use higher gears as soon as traffic allows it
  • switch off engine whenever it is safe to do so
  • remove roof racks when not in use
  • regular maintenance, right tyre pressure
  • use air-conditioning sparingly
slide30

Hints

  • do not carry unnecessary weight
  • use of onboard electrical devices increases fuel consumption
  • check fuel consumption regularly
  • driving at high speeds increases fuel consumption significantly
  • PROMOTE GEAR SHIFT INDICATORS
slide31

GEAR SHIFT INDICATOR:

Small led on dashboard shows when driver must shift gear to drive economically

Board computer has calculated most fuel efficient shifting given circumstances

Shifting points will be a compromise between CO2, other emissions and driving behaviour

slide32

Eco Test

Because the output of the fuel labelling Directive is not harmonised the FIA Foundation has assigned the ADAC to develop Eco Test in 2002

slide33

Eco Test

Information for consumers on the environmental impact of all important new car models

Increase sensitivity of consumers on ecological aspects

Influence due to consumers behaviour on industries developments

slide34

Eco Test

Measured Pollutants: CO, HC, NOx, PM and CO2

Tests (cold and hot) in accordance with NEDC

In addition: motor way 130 km/h

Pollutants : absolute scale

CO2 : class depending scale

slide36

CONCLUSION

  • Fuel economy label is a cheap measure to influence consumer
  • it will encourage manufacturers to produce more fuel efficient vehicles
  • only a package of measures can help to substantially reduce CO2 emission from passenger cars
  • Ambitious fuel economy objectives should not counteract NOx reductions or the increase of safety and reliability of cars
slide37

CONCLUSION

FIA clubs must:

  • keep on monitoring development of fuel efficient cars and legislation concerned
  • keep on informing their members on CO2 (fuel consumption) and climate change
  • promote the advantages of gear shift indicators
  • promote the advantages of environmental friendly cars
  • further evaluate Eco Test
slide38

EU must:

CONCLUSION

  • increase consumer awareness of fuel consumption and environmental impacts
  • make one EU-wide harmonised label and calculation method (relative comparison within category). It is better for consumers and only then manufacturers can label cars easily during production
  • introduce Internet version
slide39

EU must:

CONCLUSION

  • review shift points in emission test cycle because currently there are manual gear boxes with six or seven gears
  • develop a method in which (driving) attitude of consumer (high acceleration, fast driving, use of airco etc.) is clearly expressed in costs
slide40

THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION

www.fiafoundation.com