presentations overview l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
PRESENTATIONS Overview PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
PRESENTATIONS Overview

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 19

PRESENTATIONS Overview - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 370 Views
  • Uploaded on

PRESENTATIONS Overview PRESENTATIONS – THESE MATTER Sad but true – presenting probably matters more than writing in economics. Why: Most academics go to far more seminars then they read full papers

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'PRESENTATIONS Overview' - JasminFlorian


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

PRESENTATIONS – THESE MATTER

  • Sad but true – presenting probably matters more than writing in economics.
  • Why:
    • Most academics go to far more seminars then they read full papers
    • My guess is people remember the average seminar more than the average paper – certainly the very good/bad ones
    • My guess is people also form opinions strongly on seminar appearances – think of the job market as one example!
slide4

PRESENTATIONS – THE BASIC (1)

  • Do’s
  • Use 24 (or minimum 20) point font:
      • Easy to read
      • If you need smaller font, there’s too much on the slide
  • Use trackers to break down sections – provides structure
  • Dont’s
  • Use many fonts, colors, sizes unless necessary. This is distracting.
  • Use backgrounds (picture of a mountain, colored shapes etc..)
  • Avoid too much junk repeated on every slide (like this)
slide5

PRESENTATIONS – THE BASICS (2)

Look at the audience (not screen/PC). This requires preparation

Scan the audience – engages people and gives you feedback

Speak loudly – enough so everyone can hear

Speak at a reasonable (slow-enough pace)

Smile and appear relaxed (even if you’re not) – people take cues from you

Keep going even if things go badly – it is hard to assess how things are going during a presentation

slide7

PRESENTATIONS – STRUCTURE

  • A good presentation should have a rough story – for example:
    • Here is an interesting fact – ideally graphical
    • Here is the unresolved question
    • Here is the summary of my answer
    • Here is my answer in more detail
      • Model
      • Empirics
  • An ideal paper has a some results which are ex ante intuitive (predictable but comforting) and some which are only ex-post intuitive (interesting)
  • You should be able to give your 5-minute and 1-minute version of your paper – I end up having to do this all the time
slide8

PRESENTATIONS – STYLE

  • Only use equations if required – most human-brains struggle with these – never include these to “look smart” (very 1980s….)
  • Try to use graphs if possible – much easier to understand
  • I also like action leads for graphs (titles that summarize the main point on the page) - see examples on next slides
    • These are also best for policy/business presentations
    • Downside of these for academic seminars is less flexibility
slide9

FIRM LEVEL DISTRIBUTION OF MANAGEMENT SCORES BY COUNTRY

STANDARD LEAD

Franceaverage=3.14

n=137

Germanyaverage=3.31

n=157

UKaverage=3.07

n=154

USaverage=3.35

n=290

slide10

THERE IS A WIDE FIRM LEVEL SPREAD IN EVERY COUNTRY, WITH LONG TAILS IN THE UK & FRANCE

ACTION LEAD

Franceaverage=3.14

n=137

Germanyaverage=3.31

n=157

UKaverage=3.07

n=154

USaverage=3.35

n=290

slide11

PRESENTATIONS – PREPARATION (1)

  • You need to practice to be good. Do this at least the day before
  • My rule of thumb is to spend 2/3 time producing, 1/3 practice
  • Practice means saying the complete slide pack out-loud from start to finish with a watch. This helps
    • Timing – the only way to do this
    • Content – you improve this by having to say it
    • Wording – you work out what sounds natural
    • Delivery – much more fluid and confident
  • Do this whenever you change format (i.e. a 30 min AEA session)
slide12

PRESENTATIONS – PREPARATION (2)

  • Check the room out in advance – move furniture if necessary.
    • You want some space to move around
    • Avoid any leads around your feet
    • Have a chair to perch on for questions if needed
    • Clear some space to put your pad for note
    • Don’t leave your water next to your laptop - once at Cowles I knocked my bottle straight onto it, and water poured into it….
  • Also try to set-up 10 minutes early to avoid disasters and start calm
  • Prepare responses to possible questions – practice saying these!
slide13

PRESENTATIONS – DELIVERY (1)

Always always always be polite! In particular never suggest a question is stupid in any way (even if it is).

Use peoples first names wherever possible

Refer back to people that asked questions earlier – do this as much as possible

Refer to peoples work if it is relevant to you presentation. This requires research – guess your audience and scan their work

Always appear calm and relaxed even if the questions are tough

You can park one question a seminar – i.e. say “that’s a good question”, repeat to clarify, then say “let me think about that”

slide14

PRESENTATIONS – DELIVERY (2)

  • Use a pen and paper and write down many comments:
      • Hard to remember stuff
      • Makes it clear you are not ignoring questions
  • You want lots of questions – if the audience is silent try pausing as you might be too fast (i.e. drink, appear to think etc…)
  • Have a bottle of water – also drink when pushed for time…
  • Take a clicker – then use the red-dot to intimidate anyone with nasty questions Terminator 2 style. Shine it in their face ……(only kidding)
slide16

PRESENTATIONS – OTHER MISCALLENEOUS (1)

  • Be very wary of “work-in-progress” seminars – unfortunate but true, you are always being judged
  • If you have a good paper (your job-market paper) keep presenting:
      • It disseminates your work
      • It disseminates you
      • You continue to get useful feedback for a long-time
  • Have a large set of backup slides. Use these to include:
      • Response to possible questions (looks prepared)
      • Topics which are interesting but tangential
  • But, try to avoid flicking too much in presentations – disorientating
  • Close all open background programs before presenting
slide17

PRESENTATIONS – OTHER MISCALLENEOUS (2)

Always use your own laptop if possible – you know yours works…

Get practice wherever possible – still after about 50+ seminars I am definitely learning. So apply for PhD seminars, conferences, internal workshops, overseas presentations…

Best bet is to dress “Smart-casual” – i.e. slacks and a shirt. Suit & tie only for policy/business presentations or Rookie market

Timing – for a 1.5 hour seminar prepare to talk for 1 hour, leaving about 30 minutes for questions

Plan ahead – so work out which sections to drop if time runs short.

Occasional humours works well in longer seminars to help keep people engaged (if you can manage this)

slide18

PRESENTATIONS – OTHER MISCALLENEOUS (3)

  • On your website load your most recent version of the paper and the presentation – provides back-up in case of disaster
  • Also prepare a PDF of your slides in advance – this is computer robust (i.e. works on every machine)
  • Do not worry too much about Powerpoint vs Beamer
    • In macro people use Beamer more (in labor PP more)
    • I would go with whichever is easiest
  • Try to avoid referring to tables/figures/pages in the paper – many people will go to these immediately and you lose their attention
slide19

SUMMARY

  • Presenting is mostly a question of practice and preparation
  • It is never predictable, but you can maximise through the steps on:
      • Structure
      • Style
      • Delivery
      • And most of all practice, practice, practice