Download
materialization n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
MATERIALIZATION PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
MATERIALIZATION

MATERIALIZATION

349 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

MATERIALIZATION

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. MATERIALIZATION …In order to understand architecture, it is important that we should keep in mind the most subtle and powerful principle of all arts: the agreement between material and form, made as intimate and thorough as possible by the nature of things. ….The fusion of these two elements is the absolute aim of all great art….the simplest example is offered by poetry which cannot exist without the close association or the magic symbiosis of sound and meaning… Paul Valery

  2. MATERIALIZATION 1. The Materials 2. The Enclosure 3. Structural Systems 4. Composition of the Building

  3. 1. THE MATERIALS Selection of materials should be done with a high degree of coordination: a)seeking material unity (large number of different materials tend to create a sense of disunity ) b)atmosphere or feeling (expression) c)texture compatibility (association among materials) d)surrounding buildings (uses and patterns)

  4. 1. THE MATERIALS

  5. 1. THE MATERIALS

  6. 1. THE MATERIALS

  7. 1. THE MATERIALS

  8. 2. THE ENCLOSURE enclosure The materialization of the is the creation of the physical shell around the building spaces. This materialization is concerned with the relationships between: the enclosing planes, the openings, and the elements of the structure

  9. 2. THE ENCLOSURE The enclosing planes of a building include its... roof, ceiling, floor and walls • Roofs and Ceilings: • - The roof plane and the ceiling plane may be the • same (i.e. wood deck) or two different surfaces • (dropped ceiling) • - Avoid roof situations that trap water. • - The protection of overhangs should be used only • when needed. • Floors: • - In multi-story and basement conditions, the floor is • similar to the roof framing. • - Where land contours are pronounced, floor levels of • spaces may impose upon or be in sympathy with the • land. • Walls: • - Walls may be structural (bearing other loads) or non • structural (only holding up their own weight) • - Non-structural walls are used for barriers or filters • between two conflicting or incompatible situations: • walls may be temperature, acoustic or visual barriers.

  10. 2. THE ENCLOSURE Openings in buildings may take several forms: Openings should be woven into the entire building geometry as strongly as possible doors, windows, skylights, etc. • Doors • - Door placement should relate to the circulation • system in the building and spaces. It determines the • number of used areas formed in a space. • - Doors should rest against a wall when open. This • minimizes swing area needed and door interference • with space activities. • - Interior doors swing into its space while exterior • doors swing out. • Windows • - The extent and placement of window openings • should relate to space need for view, light or • protection from outside forces. • - Window sill height should relate to furniture height • where furniture is against a wall at a window. • - Window placement must respond to view orientation • of spaces.

  11. 3. THE STRUCTURE 3.1. Structural Requirements 3.2. Structure Types 3.2.1. Post and Beam Structures 3.2.2. Arches and Vaulted Halls, and Domes 3.2.3. Portal Frames 3.2.4. Trusses 3.2.5. Space Frames 3.2.6. Folded Roofs 3.2.7. Shells 3.2.8. Tensile Structures 3.3.DETERMINATION OF THE STRUCTURAL FORM 3.3.1. Design Strategies 3.3.2. Selection Of The Generic Type Of Structure 3.3.3. Selection Of Structural Material

  12. 3. The Structure3.1. STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS • DURABILITY • The durability of the structure depends entirely in the physical/chemical conditions • of the structural material, and our willingness to continue using the building ( at the • end of the lifecycle of a building, it may be demolished) • STABILITY AND EQUILLIBRIUM • When the structure is stable and in equilibrium it resists any load without suffering • a major change of shape or collapsing. • STRENGTH AND RIGIDITY • Strength and rigidity are reached by the adequate specification of geometry, size, • and the material of the structural elements. In example, for resisting the same • structural load, a steel structural element needs a smaller cross section than a • reinforced concrete element, and this is due to the difference between the • strength of the kind of materials.

  13. 3. The Structure3.1. MORE ABOUT STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS: LOADS

  14. 3. The Structure3.1. MORE ABOUT STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS: LOADS

  15. 3. The Structure3.1. MORE ABOUT STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS: LOADS

  16. 3. The Structure3.1. MORE ABOUT STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS: LOADS

  17. 3. The Structure3.2. STRUCTURE TYPES ROOFS SUPPORTED WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS SUBJECTS OF TENSION: MASTED STRUCTURES ROOFS SUPPORTED WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS SUBJECTS OF COMPRESSION: POST AND BEAM STRUCTURES: - LOAD BEARING WALLS - SKELETON FRAME ROOF STRUCTURES - ARCHES, VAULTED HALLS, AND DOMES - PORTAL FRAMES - TRUSSES - SPACE FRAMES - FOLDED ROOFS - SHELLS - MEMBRANES AND TENTS

  18. 3. The Structure3.2. MORE ABOUT STRUCTURE TYPES: MATERIALIZATION OF A CUBE

  19. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.1.POST AND BEAM STRUCTURES • Most architectural structures are of the post-and-beam type. • Post and beam buildings carry the weight of their structural components • (and the weight of objects and people in them) by bearing on one another. • The weight of the roof and beams is carried by the posts down to the foundation • and then into the ground. Horizontal beams are subject to bending loads, • therefore the structural materials should be able of resisting both tension and • compression. • We can further subdivide the post and beam structures into:

  20. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.1.MORE ABOUTPOST AND BEAM STRUCTURES: LOAD BEARING WALLS

  21. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.1.MORE ABOUTPOST AND BEAM STRUCTURES: LOAD BEARING WALLS

  22. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.1.MORE ABOUTPOST AND BEAM STRUCTURES: LOAD BEARING WALLS

  23. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.1.MORE ABOUTPOST AND BEAM STRUCTURES: SKELETON FRAME

  24. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.2.ARCHES, VAULTED HALLS, AND DOMES

  25. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.2.MORE ABOUTARCHES AND VAULTED ROOFS

  26. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.2.MORE ABOUTDOMES

  27. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.3.PORTAL FRAMES

  28. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.3. MORE ABOUT PORTAL FRAMES

  29. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.4.TRUSSES

  30. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.4. MORE ABOUT TRUSSES

  31. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.5.SPACE FRAMES

  32. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.5.MORE ABOUT SPACE FRAMES

  33. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.5.MORE ABOUT SPACE FRAMES

  34. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.6.FOLDED ROOFS

  35. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.6. MORE ABOUT FOLDED ROOFS

  36. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.7.SHELLS

  37. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.7. MORE ABOUT SHELLS

  38. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.7. MORE ABOUT SHELLS

  39. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.8.TENSILE STRUCTURES

  40. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.8.MORE ABOUT TENSILE STRUCTURES

  41. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.8.MORE ABOUT TENSILE STRUCTURES

  42. 3. The Structure3.2. Structure Types3.2.8.MORE ABOUT TENSILE STRUCTURES

  43. 3. The Structure3.3. DETERMINATION OF THE STRUCTURAL FORM

  44. 3. The Structure3.3. Determination Of The Structural Form3.3.1.DESIGN STRATEGIES

  45. 3. The Structure3.3. Determination Of The Structural Form3.3.2.SELECTION OF THE GENERIC TYPE OF STRUCTURE

  46. 3. The Structure3.3. Determination Of The Structural Form3.3.3.SELECTION OF STRUCTURAL MATERIAL

  47. 4. COMPOSITION OF THE BUILDING4.1. ARTICULATION AND CONTINUITY

  48. 4. COMPOSITION OF THE BUILDING4.1. MORE ABOUT ARTICULATION AND CONTINUITY

  49. 4. COMPOSITION OF THE BUILDING4.2. CORNER ARTICULATION