COMPARATIVE ITINERARY OF SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL TEST TEAM - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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COMPARATIVE ITINERARY OF SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL TEST TEAM

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  1. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET COMPARATIVE ITINERARY OF SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL TEST TEAM 1998 – 99 Season1970 – 71 Season 8 Test Matches x 5 days = 40 17 ODI’s x 1 day = 17 8 County x 4 days = 32 10 County ODI’s x 1 day = 10 Total = 99 Increased by 280 % 4 Test Matches x 5 days = 20 0 ODI’s x 1 day = 0 4 County x 4 days = 16 3 County ODI’s x 1 day = 3 Total = 35

  2. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Work Analysis – 1953 Ashes Series (Fletcher 1955) 5 Test Matches Allocated time : 150 hrs Lost to English weather : 46 hrs Out of play : 4 hrs Actual hours of play : 100 hrs Batting Runs Scored : 4363 Runs per hr : 43.6 Runs run per hr : 26.6 Each batsman ran (20 m per run) : 500 m / hr Bowling Overs Bowled : 1833 Average bowler : 12 overs / day Total deliveries : 11026 Fielding Fielded by fielders : 8099 Fielders fielded : 8.1 balls / hr

  3. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Mean Daily Physical Activity for a Player (Fletcher 1955) Batting : 38.5 mins scoring 14 runs Bowling : 14 mins bowling 4.2 overs Fielding : 116 mins balls fielded 16 balls Pavilion : 191.5 mins Mean Rate of Energy Expenditure : 86.4 kcal m2h = 650 kjh

  4. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET 1954 MCC Tour Of Australia and New Zealand • Sir Leonard Hutton Fitness Guidelines : • Each player is responsible for his own fitness • He must be well rested and must not over train in practice • He should exercise only very mildly on off days • He may swim, play tennis or golf in the early morning • He must stay out of the midday sun 1986 Edition Of The Lord Taverners Cricket Clinic : • To develop stamina run, skip or cycle 10 to 20 mins in season • To develop strength : push up, sit ups and swing the bat • To enhance mobility, wide stride sitting, toe touching and head and shoulder circling

  5. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Sitting Standing Average test cricketer Fielding Bowling Batting Walking (6 km x h -1) Tennis Batting at nets Bowling at nets Squash Running (10 km x h-1) 0 100 200 300 400 500 kcal x m-2 x h -1 Energy demands of different cricketing activities, including batting, bowling and fielding, compared with other sports. Fletcher (1955)

  6. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Peak Physical Activity For A Batsman / Bowler In An ODI Match Batsman • Runs ScoredDistance Run (m) • 50 x 1 1000 • 20 x 2 800 • 10 x 3 600 • 20 x 4 800 • Total 3200 • Note : Number of decelerations = 110 • Overall average running speed = 24 kmph • (60 runs each of 3 secs = 3.2 km covered in 8 mins) • Bowler • Fast bowler delivers 60 deliveries in 40 mins • Runs 1.9 km in 5.3 mins at an average speed of 21.6 kmph • Delivery action 64 secs of upper body action, 64 secs of lower body deceleration

  7. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Models For Understanding The Physiological Demands Of Cricket The classic cardiovascular – anaerobic model The energy supply -- energy depletion model The muscle power -- muscle recruitment model

  8. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Models For Understanding The Physiological Demands Of Cricket The classic cardiovascular – anaerobic model The energy supply -- energy depletion model The muscle power -- muscle recruitment model

  9. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Aerobic lipolysis Oxygen Independent glycolysis 35% Oxygen Independent glycolysis 60% 8% Aerobic lipolysis 50% Phosphagens (ATP + PCr) 56% Aerobic Glycolysis 92% Aerobic glycolysis 65% Aerobic glycolysis 50% Oxygen independent glycolysis 44% Aerobic glycolysis 40% 6 seconds 30 seconds 120 seconds 40 minutes 5 hours Duration of Activity Postulated contributions (% of total energy) from the different metabolic energy systems used during activities lasting different durations. Note the predominant contribution from oxygen-independent glycolysis and the phosphagens in activities of short duration (less than 40 s) typical of cricket

  10. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Models For Understanding The Physiological Demands Of Cricket The classic cardiovascular – anaerobic model The energy supply -- energy depletion model The muscle power -- muscle recruitment model

  11. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Various Sports : Predominant Energy Systems % Emphasis per Energy Systems ATP-PC Sports or Sports Activityand LALA-0202 Baseball/Cricket 80 20 - Basketball 85 15 - Field hockey 60 20 20 Golf 95 5 - Soccer 80 20 - Tennis 70 20 10

  12. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Definitions Of Various Training Methods & Development Of The Energy Systems % Emphasis per Energy Systems ATP-PC Training MethodDefinitionand LALA-0202 Acceleration Gradual Increase 90 5 5 Sprints in running speed from jogging to striding to sprinting in 50 – 120 yd segments Hollow Sprints Two sprints interrupted 85 10 5 by “hollow” periods of jogging or walking Interval training Repeated periods of 0 – 80 0 – 80 0 - 80 work interspersed with periods of relief Sprint training Repeated sprints at 90 6 4 maximum speed with complete recovery between repeats

  13. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET Models For Understanding The Physiological Demands Of Cricket The classic cardiovascular – anaerobic model The energy supply -- energy depletion model The muscle power -- muscle recruitment model

  14. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Cricket Batters Bowlers Rugby Backline players Loose forwards Height Mass VO2max Shuttle run Body fat (cm) (kg) (ml x kg-1 x min-1) (number) (%) Comparison of ‘aerobic’ physiological characteristics of South African international cricketers and rugby players. Rugby players are taller and heavier than cricketers

  15. PHYSIOLOGY & ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CRICKET 8 6 4 2 0 Cricket Batters Bowlers Rugby Backline players Loose forwards Leg press Bench press 35m sprint (kg x kg-1) (kg x kg-1) (s) Comparison of ‘anaerobic’ physiological characteristics of South African international cricketers and rugby players

  16. GROWTH SPURTS IN CHILDREN 1. 6-8 Years (stretching phase) Period of intensified increase in Length. 2. 9-12 Years. Phase of intensified growth in breadth. 3. 11-12 to 14-15 Years for Girls. 12-13 to 15-16 Years for Boys. Phase of intensified growth in Length (stretching Phase). 4. 14-15 to 16-17 Years for Girls. 15-16 to 18-19 Years for Boys. Phase of intensified growth in Breadth (Filling Phase).

  17. Long Term Physical Fitness Development – Age Related Goals • AIMS : In order to get the most out of training based on Maturation Principles • To achieve progressive adaptation to the demands of the game • Minimise the risk of injury and burn out Maximum Age Fitness Parameters Maturation 6 – 8 9 – 11 12 – 14 15 – 17 18 – 20 20 Above Flexibility 12 – 14 2 3 3 4 4 > Co-ordination 12 – 14 1 2 3 3 3 > Speed – Reaction 16 – 18 1 1 2 3 3 > Speed – Endurance 18 – 20 ~ ~ 1 2 3 > Speed – Acceleration 20 – 25 1 1 2 3 3 > Aerobic – Endurance 20 – 25 1 1 2 3 3 > Anaerobic – Endurance 18 – 20 ~ ~ 1 2 3 > Strength – Maximum 23 – 25 ~ ~ 1 2 3 > Strength – Explosive 20 – 23 ~ ~ 1 2 3 > Strength – Endurance 23 – 25 ~ ~ 1 2 3 > Age and performance related goals: Commencement of Training 1 – 2 sessions per week Intermediate Level of Training 2 – 4 sessions per week Advance Level of Training 4 or > sessions per week

  18. THANK YOU

  19. QUESTIONS