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2002 National Recreational Boating Survey Review of Findings www.strategicresearchgroup.com This project was conducted on behalf of the United States Coast Guard, Office of Homeland Security

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2002 national recreational boating survey

2002 National Recreational Boating Survey

Review of Findings

www.strategicresearchgroup.com

slide2
This project was conducted on behalf of the United States Coast Guard, Office of Homeland Security
  • The purpose of this survey was to learn more about individuals who enjoy boating for recreation, the boats they use, the activities they enjoy, and their knowledge, attitudes, and experiences.
    • More than 25,000 individuals across the nation participated in this research, each answering over 160 questions.
    • For the full report, please visit the SRG website at www.strategicresearchgroup.com or the United States Coast Guard website.
methodology4
Methodology
  • Two Data Collection Methods:
  • Registered Boaters: Mail-out survey of individuals who owned a registered boat and operated it between September 2001 and September 2002.
  • 250 per state or territory
  • Nonregistered Boaters: Telephone interview of individuals how had operated a boat between September 2001 and September 2002 but did not own a registered boat.
  • 250 per state or territory
methodology5
Methodology
  • Two-Stage Weighting Scheme:
  • During telephone interviewing, information regarding boat ownership and boat operation between September 2001 and 2002 was obtained for all sampled households.
  • Using this information, data were weighted to reflect the proportion of nonusers, registered boaters and nonregistered boaters within each state.
  • For national estimates, state-weighted data were weighted to reflect the proportion of the national population for each state.
methodology6
Methodology
  • National Results are presented with Regional breakdowns when appropriate.
    • Regions
    • West Coast
    • Mountain States
    • Great Lakes
    • Northeast
    • Southeast
    • Midwest
methodology7
Methodology
  • For national and regional findings the data were weighted to reflect the state proportion of the total U.S.
  • This means that each individual’s responses were either increased or decreased so that the final responses reflected the population of the U.S.
  • Regional analyses were conducted for this presentation. Most regional differences were negligible, but some key regional differences were identified
presentation overview
Who operates boats?

What types of boats are they using?

All boats

Boat operated most often (BOMO)

How often do they boat?

In what activities are they most likely to engage?

How safe are boat operators?

Where do boat operators stand on current issues?

Presentation Overview
population estimates of the number of times top 5 types of boats were used
Population Estimates of the Number of Times Top 5 Types of Boats Were Used

Boats were used over 60 million times between September 2001 and 2002. This estimate was obtained by asking BO if they used a boat and then projecting to population.

population estimates of number of hours boated
Population Estimates of Number of Hours Boated

Together, both primary and secondary operators spent over 6 billion hours on the water between September 2001 and 2002. This estimate was obtained by multiplying the number of days boated by the average number of hours boated per day.

lifetime number of hours operating a boat
Lifetime Number of Hours Operating a Boat
  • How many total hours of boat operating experience have you had in your lifetime?
  • 38.5% of BOs have over 500 hours of experience.
  • 23% of BOs have between 100 and 500 hours of experience.
  • 2.3% of BOs have less than 1 hour of experience
most frequent activities by means of propulsion
Most Frequent Activities by Means of Propulsion
  • Propeller
  • 67.8% fish for recreation
  • 61.4% cruise using engine
  • 32.7% swim or dive off boat
  • 31.8% water-ski or tube
most frequent activities by means of propulsion37
Most Frequent Activities by Means of Propulsion
  • Water jet
  • 81.5% cruise using engine
  • 44.5% water-ski or tube
  • 29.7% swim or dive off boat
  • 16% race
most frequent activities by means of propulsion38
Most Frequent Activities by Means of Propulsion
  • Sail
  • 94.4% sail
  • 23.9% swim or dive off boat
  • 21.8% cruise using engine
  • 15.2% race
most frequent activities by means of propulsion39
Most Frequent Activities by Means of Propulsion
  • Air Thrust
  • 78.4% cruise using engine
  • 35.5% water-ski or tube
  • 29.8% recreational fish
  • 24.1% swim or dive off boat
most frequent activities by means of propulsion40
Most Frequent Activities by Means of Propulsion
  • Manual/Oars/Paddle
  • 85.7% paddle
  • 38.6% fish for recreation
  • 23.2% swim or dive off boat
  • 7.9% whitewater sports
boating safety course experience
Boating Safety Course Experience
  • When was the last time you took a boating safety course?
  • 65.2% of boat operators have NEVER taken a boating safety course.
  • 15.1% have taken a boating safety course within the past 5 years.
  • 15.2% took a boating safety course over 10 years ago
predictors of participation in a boating safety course
Predictors of Participation in a Boating Safety Course
  • Younger boaters are less likely to have completed a safety course.
  • Registered boaters are more likely to have completed a safety course.
  • Operators with higher levels of boating issue awareness (saw, read, or heard information on boat safety) were more likely to have completed a safety course.
issues examined
Issues Examined
  • Knowledge and Licensure
    • People who operate boats should be required to have licenses, which could be revoked if they commit a violation
    • People who operate boats should be required to pass a test to demonstrate their knowledge of boating laws and Navigation Rules
  • PFD Use
    • All children under the age of 13 years should be required to wear a life jacket/PFD while on a boat
    • Persons of all ages should be required to wear a life jacket or PFD while on a boat
issues examined cont d
Issues Examined , cont’d
  • Law Enforcement
    • Boating under the influence laws should be strongly enforced
    • There should be more enforcement to control reckless boaters
    • The amount and or type of boating traffic should be restricted in certain areas, even if it meant you might be restricted from traveling in certain areas
analysis of attitudes on key issues
Analysis of Attitudes on Key Issues
  • SRG used statistical methods to profile the types of BOs who are most likely to agree or not agree with each statement. Variables included were demographic characteristics and BOMO.
  • General findings
  • Women tend to agree with all issues more than men.
  • Minorities (except Native Americans) agreed more with all issues except those about enforcement, specifically alcohol enforcement and reckless boating.
predictors of attitudes on key issues cont d
Predictors of Attitudes on Key Issues, cont’d
  • Knowledge and Licensure
    • People boating offshore in the Ocean or Gulf or in the Great Lakes agree with both knowledge and licensure items
    • Boaters who have taken safety courses are more likely to agree with both knowledge and licensure items
    • More experienced boaters (i.e. those with more lifetime hours spent boating) disagree with a license requirement
    • Boaters who used inflatable boats and kayaks tended to agree that licenses should be required
    • Boaters who used sailboats (both sail-only and motor), houseboats, and cabin motorboats were likely to agree with a knowledge test requirement
predictors of attitudes on key issues cont d54
Predictors of Attitudes on Key Issues, cont’d
  • PFD Use
    • More experienced boaters disagree with requiring boaters of all ages to wear PFDs.
    • Older boaters (independent of experience) are more likely to agree that all ages should be required to wear PFDs.
    • Boaters who used canoes, kayaks, rowboats, inflatable boats, and personal watercraft agreed that all ages should be required to wear PFDs
    • More educated boaters disagree with requiring all ages to wear PFDs.
    • Boating club or organization members tended to disagree that children under the age of 13 should be required to wear PFDs.
predictors of attitudes on key issues cont d55
Predictors of Attitudes on Key Issues, cont’d
  • Law Enforcement
    • We found no predictors of agreement with stronger enforcement of BUI laws except gender (women agree)
    • Older boaters are more likely to agree there should be more enforcement to control reckless boating
    • More educated boaters disagree with restricting boating traffic.
    • In terms of enforcement, there were no relationships between particular types of boats (BOMO) and attitudes towards enforcement of BUI laws or reckless boating.
    • But, canoe, kayak, rowboat, and inflatable boat users agreed that boating traffic should sometimes be restricted
in summary
In Summary
  • Boaters represent a diverse and somewhat difficult-to-reach group of national importance, but their behaviors are important to understand because of their impact on passengers and others sharing waterways.
  • A clear majority of boaters have not completed boating safety courses—understanding real and perceived barriers to completing safety courses could help to increase participation and ultimately reduce fatalities.
  • Boaters’ attitudes on issues of regulation and enforcement are often strong, but understanding which boaters are likely to support—or not support—specific issues can aid in communication and policy development.