looking at performance compliance results and perspective l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Looking at Performance: Compliance, Results and Perspective PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Looking at Performance: Compliance, Results and Perspective

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 61

Looking at Performance: Compliance, Results and Perspective - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 334 Views
  • Uploaded on

Looking at Performance: Compliance, Results and Perspective Jacquelyn J. Thompson, Ph.D. Director Office of Special Education and Early Intervention Services MTSA March 2008

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Looking at Performance: Compliance, Results and Perspective' - Gabriel


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
looking at performance compliance results and perspective

Looking at Performance: Compliance, Results and Perspective

Jacquelyn J. Thompson, Ph.D.

Director

Office of Special Education and Early Intervention Services

MTSA March 2008

slide2
The White Rabbit put on his spectacles. ‘Where shall I begin, please your Majesty?’ he asked. ‘Begin at the beginning,’ the King said gravely, ‘and go on till you come to the end: then stop.’

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

the 21 st century 3 rs
The 21st Century “3 Rs”
  • Willard Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, has coined the new “3Rs”
    • Rigor (what and how of learning)
    • Relevance (application to real world)
    • Relationships (essential human connections)
basic data special ed in michigan
BASIC DATA: SPECIAL ED IN MICHIGAN

“Not everything that can be counted, counts. And not everything that counts can be counted.”

Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

special education eligibility
Special Education Eligibility

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

special education eligibility as percent of student population
Special Education Eligibility asPercent of Student Population

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

slide7

2007 Identification Rates By Disability

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

slide8

LD SI CI OHI EI ASD ECDD PI SXI HI VI TBI D/B

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

specific learning disability 1991 2007
Specific Learning Disability 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

speech and language impairment 1991 2007
Speech and LanguageImpairment 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

cognitive impairment 1991 2007
Cognitive Impairment 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

emotional impairment 1991 2007
Emotional Impairment 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

autism spectrum disorder 1991 2007
Autism Spectrum Disorder 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

early childhood developmental delay 1991 2007
Early Childhood Developmental Delay 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

severe multiple impairment 1991 2007
Severe Multiple Impairment 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

hearing impairment 1991 2007
Hearing Impairment 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

visual impairment 1991 2007
Visual Impairment 1991-2007

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

gender by age level
Gender by Age Level

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

annual performance report apr
Annual Performance Report (APR)
  • IDEA Requirements for State Reporting
    • 20 Compliance and Results Indicators
    • Data from multiple sources
    • Targets and baselines
    • Improvement activities
    • USDOE uses for State level “Determinations” (status in meeting the requirements of law)
annual performance report apr21
Annual Performance Report (APR)
  • Public Reporting
    • On each LEA, in relation to State Targets
    • Annually
  • Determinations
    • On each LEA, in relation to State Targets
    • Annually
    • Consequences (Section 616 of IDEA)
slide22
“A goal without a plan is just a wish.”

Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900-1944)

annual performance report
Annual Performance Report

CORE QUESTIONS

  • Are children with IEPs entering school ready to learn at high levels? (6,7,11,12)
  • Are students with IEPs achieving at high levels? (3,4,5,8,9,10)
annual performance report24
Annual Performance Report

CORE QUESTIONS

3. Are students with IEPs prepared for success beyond high school? (1,2,13,14)

4. Does the infrastructure support the implementation of IDEA? (15 – 20)

slide25
“You cannot hope to build a better world without improving the individuals. To that end, each of us must work for our own improvement and, at the same time, share a general responsibility for all humanity.”

Marie Curie (1867-1934)

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

1. AYP - Participation and performance of children with IEPs on statewide assessments

Target (NCLB): 95% participation

Michigan Performance:

Participation rates across grades = 96.4% - 99.7%

Targets (NCLB): vary by grade

Percent of districts meeting the State’s AYP objectives for progress for SWD: 99.7%

Results Indicator #3

students with ieps ages 6 21
Students With IEPs Ages 6-21

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels29
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

2. Suspension and Expulsion – percent of districts having a significant discrepancy in the rates of suspension and expulsion of children with IEPs for greater than 10 days in a school year.

Target: <10%

Michigan Performance: <1%

Results Indicator #4

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels30
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

3. LRE (Educational Environments) – Percent of children with IEPs removed from regular (gen ed) class:

  • Less than 21% of the day

Target: 55%

Michigan Performance: 50.3%

Results Indicator #5

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels31
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

3. LRE (Educational Environments) – Percent of children with IEPs removed from regular (gen ed) class:

  • Greater than 60% of the day

Target: 16.9% or less

Michigan Performance: 18.5%

Results Indicator #5

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels32
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

3. LRE (Educational Environments) – Percent of children with IEPs removed from regular (gen ed) class and:

  • Served in separate schools, buildings, residential placements, or homebound or hospital placements

Target: 5.1% or less

Michigan Performance: 5%

Results Indicator #5

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels34
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

4. Parent Involvement – percent of parents with a child with an IEP who report that schools facilitated parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for the child

Target: 21% composite weighted ratio/NCSEAM Ladder

achieving the performance standard as set by a national standard-setting process

Michigan Performance: 23.59%

Results Indicator #8

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels35
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

5. Disproportionality – percent of districts with disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic groups in special education that is the result of inappropriate identification (non-compliant policies, procedures and practices)

Target: 0%

Michigan Performance: <1%

Compliance Indicator #9

apr core questions group 2 achieving at high levels36
APR Core Questions (Group #2):Achieving at High Levels

6. Disproportionality – percent of districts with disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic groups in specific disability categories that is the result of inappropriate identification (non-compliant policies, procedures and practices)

Target: 0%

Michigan Performance: 2.4%

Compliance Indicator #10

apr core questions group 3 ready for success after school
APR Core Questions (Group #3):Ready for Success after School
  • Graduation – percent of youth with IEPs graduating from high school with a regular diploma compared to percent of all youth in the State graduating with a regular diploma.

Target: 80% (NCLB/MI target for all students)

Michigan Performance: 69%

Results Indicator #1

apr core questions group 3 ready for success after school38
APR Core Questions (Group #3):Ready for Success after School

2. Dropout- percent of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school compared to the percent of all youth in the State dropping out of high school.

Target: 11.5% or less

Michigan Performance: 28.9%

Results Indicator #2

graduation dropout rates students with disabilities 1996 2007
Graduation/Dropout Rates Students with Disabilities 1996-2007

*2007 represents data from the 2006-07 school year

Sources: MICIS 1996-2006 & CEPI-SRSD 2006-2007

apr core questions group 3 ready for success after school40
APR Core Questions (Group #3):Ready for Success after School

3.Secondary Transition – percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals.

Target: 100%

Michigan Performance: 40%

Compliance Indicator #13

apr core questions group 3 ready for success after school41
APR Core Questions (Group #3):Ready for Success after School
  • Does the IEP identify the student’s post-secondary vision/goals?

Target: 100%

Michigan Performance: 89%

  • Does the IEP identify the student’s strengths, preferences, interests, needs academic achievement, and functional performance?

Target: 100%

Michigan Performance: 61%

apr core questions group 3 ready for success after school42
APR Core Questions (Group #3):Ready for Success after School
  • Will the annual IEP goals and transition services reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary vision?
    • Target: 100%
    • Michigan Performance: 51%
  • Are the IEP goals measurable?
    • Target: 100%
    • Michigan Performance: 78%
apr core questions group 3 ready for success after school43
APR Core Questions (Group #3):Ready for Success after School
  • Was the IEP convened within an annual time frame?

Target: 100%

Michigan Performance: 76%

ages 22 years
Ages 22+ Years

Source: December 1, 2007/MICIS

apr core questions group 3 ready for success after school46
APR Core Questions (Group #3):Ready for Success after School

4. Post-Secondary Outcomes – percent of youth who had IEPs and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of postsecondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school.

Baseline data established this year (2006-07)

Target for 2007-08: 70%

Results Indicator #14

slide47

Indicator 14: Percent of youth who had IEPs, are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of postsecondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school

Source: Part B State APR for FFY 2006 (2006-2007)

improving results
IMPROVING RESULTS
  • Evidenced-Based Practices
  • Balanced Assessment
  • Student Progress Monitoring
  • Supports and Strategies in Place
  • Vision and What We Will Do to Achieve it
mi transition outcomes project
MI Transition Outcomes Project

“Coming together is a beginning.

Keeping together is progress.

Working together is success.”

Henry Ford (1863-1947)

core principles of rti
Core Principles of RTI

Response to Intervention:

Policy Considerations and Implementation

National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE), 2005

www.nasdse.org

implementation research
Implementation Research

Implementation Research:

A Synthesis of the Literature

Fixen, Naoom, Blasé, Friedman, Wallace (2005)

National Implementation Research Network (NIRN)

Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida

http://nirn.fmhi.usf.edu

slide52
“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.”

J.K.Rowling (1965-)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

websites
Websites
  • Michigan Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Early Intervention Services www.michigan.gov/OSE-EIS
  • Center for Educational Networking (CEN) www.cenmi.org
  • U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) www.ed.gov
websites54
Websites
  • Michigan’s Integrated Technology Supports (MITS) www.cenmi.org
  • Michigan Compliance Information System www.micis.org
  • Michigan’s Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSi) www.cenmi.org
websites55
Websites
  • Michigan’s Statewide Autism Resources and Training (START) www.gvsu.edu/autismcenter
  • Michigan Transition Outcomes Project (MITOP) www.cenmi.org/tspmi/top.asp
websites56
Websites
  • Access Center: Improving Outcomes for All Students K-8 www.k8accesscenter.org
  • National Center on Accessing the General Education Curriculum (NCAC) www.cast.org/ncac
  • Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports www.pbis.org
websites57
Websites
  • National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD) www.nrcld.org
  • The Federal Resource Center for Special Education (FRC) www.dssc.org/frc
  • National Post-School Outcomes Center www.psocenter.org
  • National Center on Student Progress Monitoring www.studentprogress.org
websites58
Websites
  • National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities www.dropoutprevention.org
  • National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems www.nccrest.org
  • Center on Innovation and Improvement www.centerii.org
websites59
Websites
  • Center on Instruction www.centeroninstruction.org
  • National High School Center www.betterhighschools.org
  • Assessment and Accountability Comprehensive Center www.aacompcenter.org
  • National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality www.ncctq.org
websites60
Websites
  • North Central Regional Resource Center

www.northcentral-rrc.org

  • National Center on Response to Intervention at American Institutes for Research (AIR)

www.rti4success.org

websites61
Websites
  • National Implementation Research Network (NIRN)

www.nirn.fmhi.usf.edu