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  1. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through EARTH SCIENCE Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  2. Connecting Unifying Concepts:Earth Science • This training was developed to help you in the following ways: • Add to your content knowledge of Earth Science concepts • Model teaching strategies that meet the needs of ELL students • Provide TEKS aligned learning experiences to use in your classroom • Provide questioning tools to help students connect learning to big ideas in Science Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  3. Other training sessions to be presented in this format are: • Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Space Science • Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Physical Science: Energy • Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Physical Science: Matter • Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Life Science Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  4. Training and materials were developed by: • Presenters: • Georgia Beatey, Garland ISD • Lisa Dwinal, Garland ISD • Rosemary Martin, Supporting Science, Inc. • Suzanne Melton, Lewisville ISD • Dr. Karen L. Ostlund, UT Austin Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  5. We have provided you with a composition book for your notebooking experiences during today’s training. • Research has shown increased achievement in science, reading, and mathematics for students who write and draw about their science experiences. Take a few minutes to introduce yourself to others at your table and discuss your student notebooking experiences in science. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  6. Unifying Concept Questions • After each activity we will ask you to discuss some of these questions. • Glue this page into your science notebook. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  7. How does science notebooking help teach the TEKS? The student is expected to . . . • Observe • Describe • Identify • Communicate • Explain • Justify • Sort/Group/Classify • Predict • Record • Illustrate • Construct graphs/tables/maps/charts Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  8. Science notebooking is a very important component of science instruction. • The more you use a notebook yourself, the more you will be able to help your students in notebooking. • Activities (in PDF format) from this presentation will be emailed to you on Monday. • This will allow you to print and create the lesson materials in either color or black and white. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  9. Pre-assessment Dropping In – Focus on Systems Weather Watch – Focus on Change Restless Rocks – Focus on Properties & Patterns Gently Down the Stream – Focus on Models Rationing Our Resources – Focus on Survival Post-assessment Evaluations Overview of the day Restrooms Breaks Lunch Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  10. During some of our activities each group will need to pick up and return materials to the supply table. • Please designate a materials manager at your table to take this responsibility during the day. • Please turn your cell phone off. Inform one of the presenters if you have an emergency situation that requires you to answer your cell phone during this training. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  11. English Language Learners • Learning experiences include • Added visuals • Vocabulary word cards • Instructional suggestions for reading, writing, and speaking tasks Take a few minutes to peruse the Proficiency Charts and Bibliography prepared by Dr. Nancy Montgomery Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  12. How can I make sure students will transfer what they have learned during hands-on activities to multiple choice questions on TAKS? The dilemma! Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  13. Blend ideas from national research on best practices in science and reading in the content area for success in ScienceANDReading. To address the dilemma . . . Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  14. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  15. Components of the Five “E” Lesson Model • Interest getting, intriguing, making connections to past learning • Provide common experiences, question and probe concepts • Information, terminology, communicate findings • Connect new concepts to prior learning to create understanding • Ongoing process for determining levels of understanding Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  16. Advantages of pre-assessment • Find out what students know • Uncover their misconceptions • Plan for instruction Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  17. Your first task today is to answer 5 questions about Earth Science content. It is OK if you do not know all the answers! • Complete your responses within 10minutes. • Have your materials manager pick up and return your group’s papers to the supply table. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  18. Learning Experience Dropping in TEKS • K.6 D, E • 1.6 A, B, D, C • 2.6 A, B, 2.10 A • 3.5 A, B, 3.7 B • 4.5 A, B, 4.7 A • 5.5 A, 5.6 B TAKS Objective 4 – Earth Science Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  19. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  20. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  21. Think about . . . • How does water change form as it moves from one place to another? • Does water always go to another location or could it stay in the same place? • When water is a gas (vapor), does it move slowly or quickly? Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  22. You will be demonstrating water’s movement from one location to another. • A roll of the die at each location determines where you go next. • Materials managers will pick up data sheets for your group. • Glue the data sheet into your notebook. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  23. Count off 1, 2, 3. • If you are liquid water, line up together and roll once representing many particles together in a water drop. • If you move to the clouds (evaporate), separate from your group and line up as individual water particles. • If you become rain in the clouds (condense), grab two new partners from the line as you move to the next location. • If your roll indicates you STAY, move to the back of the line and wait for another turn. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  24. Keep track of your journey including your STAYS by recording each turn on the data sheet. • In each turn illustrate how the water changed with an arrow between two symbols. • The symbols are: Solid Liquid Gas ICE WATER WATER VAPOR Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  25. When you fill all the spaces on your data sheet, return to your table and discuss your journey with your group. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  26. Material managers will pick up Design a Travel Brochure for each person in their group. • Read over the steps and the criteria on the rubric. • Use the information from What is the Water Cycle? to help you create your travel brochure. • Leave the outside back section blank so your brochure can be glued into your notebook. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  27. While you are working discuss how you would modify this activity to accommodate the needs of special population learners. • Think about : • what conditions are necessary for water to move to each location • the form water is in as it moves from one place to another • interesting things that might happen to the water drop Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  28. Learning experiences in science engage and motivate students. However, unless we ask guiding questions after the activities our students miss the whole point. • This results in _______, _______ kids! Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  29. Learning experiences in science engage and motivate students. However, unless we ask guiding questions after the activities our students miss the whole point. • This results in happy, dumb kids! Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  30. Processing experiences with good questioning afterwards makes students think and helps them connect the learning to bigger ideas. • Big ideas provide the framework for students to attach details, meaningful vocabulary, and connections to the real world. • Result =_______, _______ kids! Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  31. Processing experiences with good questioning afterwards makes students think and helps them connect the learning to bigger ideas. • Big ideas provide the framework for students to attach details, meaningful vocabulary, and connections to the real world. • Result = happy, SMART kids! Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  32. Discuss the Systems questions as you reflect on the activities completed during Dropping In. Write your answers to at least 2 of the questions in your notebook. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  33. Learning Experience Weather Watch TEKS • K.7 A • 1.7 A • 2.7 D • 3.6 A, B • 4.6 A • 5.6 A TAKS Objective 4 – Earth Science Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  34. How did you decide what to wear today? How did the person making the map decide what the weather was going to be? What do all the symbols mean? What can we observe to determine what the weather will do next? Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  35. Make a list in your science notebook of what you think causes weather. • In this lesson we will investigate some factors that are responsible for changes in the weather and how they can be used to make weather predictions. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  36. Pick up materials from the supply area and begin working on: Weather Watch Investigating Factors - 1 Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  37. a. The energy from the flashlight is the same for both A and B. b. More squares are covered by the angled beam, the light is spread over a larger area. c. The direct beam is more intense and would heat things more than the angled beam. d. Areas that receive direct sunlight would be hotter than areas with angled sunlight. e. Areas near the equator get direct sunlight, areas near the poles get angled sunlight. f. We receive angled light in the early morning and late afternoon, it’s not as hot as the middle of the day when the sunlight is directly overhead. g. Hamburgers directly under the lamp stay warmer than ones at an angle to the lamp. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  38. Return materials to the supply area and pick up the next set of materials. Weather Watch Investigating the Factors - 2 Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  39. While you are waiting for your sponge tower to reach 100% we will investigate further. • Look at the 4 grocery sacks. • Can you figure out if anything is different about them without picking up or touching the bags? Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  40. Light weight objects have more open space between the pieces and the pieces do not fit tightly together. • Heavy objects have less open space between the pieces and the pieces fit tightly together. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  41. An air mass is a giant bubble of air that has the same temperature and humidity throughout. • Heavy air masses have many air particles that are close together. • Light air masses have air particles that are farther apart and fewer in number. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  42. In your notebook summarize the things you learned about air masses from the human model. • Heavy air masses exert high pressure. • Light air masses exert low pressure. • The amount of heat energy from the Sun determines if an air mass is heavy or light. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  43. Remember the grocery bags? • They are hard to tell apart without picking them up to feel the difference. • Scientists have the same trouble with air pressure. They cannot tell whether the air is heavy or light without measuring it in some way. • They measure air pressure with an instrument called a barometer. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  44. There is an easy way to make a barometer. • Pick up materials from the supply area to complete: Weather Watch Investigating Factors - 3 Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  45. Watch the straw for several days. • The balloon will move it up or down as the air pressure changes. • When pressure goes up the straw will go higher and when pressure goes down, the straw will dip lower. • High pressure indicates fair weather and low air pressure indicates cloudy, wet weather. • When the pressure does not change, neither does the weather. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  46. By now your sponge tower has reached 100% • Can you explain why the sponge filled up quickly to 50% but took a long time to fill up to 100%? • Air, like the sponge, has a harder time soaking up more water when it is already full. • That is why you feel sticky on very humid days. The air is already full of water and can’t take any from you. Instead of your perspiration evaporating from your skin to cool you off, it stays on your skin making you feel hot and sticky. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  47. Evaporation adds water vapor to the air. • The amount of water vapor in the air is called humidity. • When humidity reaches 100%, the air is saturated, which means it cannot hold any more water vapor. • Clouds form when the air is nearly saturated. • As the air cools the water condenses and falls back to Earth as precipitation, rain, snow, hail, or sleet. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  48. Return all your materials to the supply area and pick up the Reading Notes for each person in your group and the Weather Watch Data chart and cards. • Your group will now use the information from the reading and what you have recorded in your notebook to organize the cards on the data chart. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  49. Make sure your chart is correct before recording in your notebook. • Return Reading Notes and materials to the supply table. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006

  50. Discuss the Change questions as you reflect on the activities completed during Weather Watch. Write your answers to at least 2 of the questions in your notebook. Connecting to Unifying Concepts through Earth Science, 2006