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Leadership for What Works in Schools: Translating Research into Action Principals’ Partnership 2007 Summer Leadership Institute July 18, 2007 Presented by Dr. Tim Westerberg “Closing the gap between common sense and common practice.” Bertice Berry

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Leadership for What Works in Schools:

Translating Research

into Action

Principals’ Partnership

2007 Summer Leadership Institute

July 18, 2007

Presented by Dr. Tim Westerberg



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“… if we follow the guidance offered by 35 years of research, we can enter an era of unprecedented effectiveness for the public practice of education- - one in which the vast majority of schools can be highly effective in promoting student learning.”

Bob Marzano


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There are two ways to improve results- - redesign your school based on best practices, or get different kids.


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Leadership school based on best practices, or get different kids.

Leadership

Leadership

Leadership

Factors Influencing Achievement

1. Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum

2. Challenging Goals and Effective Feedback

3. Parent and Community Involvement

4. Safe and Orderly Environment

5. Collegiality and Professionalism

School

6. Instructional Strategies

7. Classroom Management

8. Classroom Curriculum Design

Teacher

9. Home Environment

10. Learning Intelligence/ Background Knowledge

11 Motivation

Student


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Common Sense school based on best practices, or get different kids.andCommon Practice


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  • Students learn more when teachers and students are clear about what the major outcomes of a lesson, a unit, and a course are, and what “good work” looks like for each outcome.

  • What you can expect to learn, and the “body of evidence” (student work) that will earn an A or a B in a course, should not be determined by the teacher with whom the computer schedules you.

  • Curriculum anarchy is unfair to kids.

  • Too many standards spoil the schools.


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“… decisions about what to teach in each grade are left up to schools, many of which pass the choice on to teachers. The result is an uneven hodgepodge of instructional aims and subject matter, with content and expectations varying sharply from classroom to classroom and from school to school… curriculum anarchy…”

Craig Jerald. “Beyond the Rock and the Hard Place.” Educational Leadership, November 2003.


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School up to schools, many of which pass the choice on to teachers. The result is an uneven hodgepodge of instructional aims and subject matter, with content and expectations varying sharply from classroom to classroom and from school to school… curriculum anarchy…”

1.Guaranteed and

Viable Curriculum

Factors Influencing Achievement

  • Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum

  • Challenging Goals and Effective Feedback

  • Parent and Community Involvement

  • Safe and Orderly Environment

  • Collegiality and Professionalism


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  • Guaranteed and up to schools, many of which pass the choice on to teachers. The result is an uneven hodgepodge of instructional aims and subject matter, with content and expectations varying sharply from classroom to classroom and from school to school… curriculum anarchy…”

  • Viable Curriculum

Guaranteed Curriculum

…“Operationally, this means that clear guidance is given to teachers regarding the content to be addressed in specific courses and at specific grade levels.”

“Additionally, it means that individual teachers do not have the option to disregard or replace content that has been assigned to a specific course or grade level.”


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  • Guaranteed and up to schools, many of which pass the choice on to teachers. The result is an uneven hodgepodge of instructional aims and subject matter, with content and expectations varying sharply from classroom to classroom and from school to school… curriculum anarchy…”

  • Viable Curriculum

Viable Curriculum

…”the content articulated in the curriculum for a given course or grade level can be adequately addressed in the time available.”


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VIABLE CURRICULUM up to schools, many of which pass the choice on to teachers. The result is an uneven hodgepodge of instructional aims and subject matter, with content and expectations varying sharply from classroom to classroom and from school to school… curriculum anarchy…”

According to McREL:

  • 14 subject areas

  • 255 standards

  • 3500 benchmark

    Hours currently available- 9,000

    Hours needed- 15,500

    K-12 to K-22


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“State learning standards are often too wide and not deep enough,” she said. “They are trying to cover too much ground—more ground than colleges deem necessary—in the limited time they have with students.” (Pg. 20)

Cynthia B. Schmeiser, ACT as reported by Lynn Olson in “Policy Push Redefining High School.” Education Week 26 no. 33 (4/18/07): 1 & 20.


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By deep enough,” she said. “They are trying to cover too much ground—more ground than colleges deem necessary—in the limited time they have with students.” Mary Beth Marklein, USA TODAY

State learning standards may help high school teachers focus their coursework, but college faculty say they're focusing on the wrong things, says a report that finds a "significant gap" between what high school instructors teach and what college faculty think entering freshmen ought to know.

"States tend to have too many standards attempting to tackle too many content topics," the report says. The report examines science, math, reading and English.

“Schoolteachers, Professors Differ on What Students Should Know.” 4/9/07.


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“Aligning Postsecondary Expectations and High School Practice…” (ACT) as Reported by Lynn Olson in Education Week 26, no. 33 (4/18/07): 1 & 20.

“In general, the ACT survey found, college instructors take a dim view of their states’ academic-content standards for high schools. Nearly two-thirds of those respondents (65 percent) said their state standards prepare students “poorly” or “very poorly” for college-level work in their respective subjects. In contrast, a majority of high school teachers said their state standards are preparing students “well” or “very well” for college-level work.” (Pg. 20)


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“I speak here of the well-researched finding that variations in student achievement are greater across classrooms within a school than across schools.”

Michael Fullan. Turnaround Leadership. Jossey-Bass, 2006, p. 55.


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Education Week. variations in student achievement are greater across classrooms within a school than across schools.” “Students Taking More Demanding Courses.” Kathleen Kennedy Manzo 2/28/07

BUT SOME OBSERVERS SAY THERE IS WIDE VARIATION IN THE CONTENT OF COURSES FROM DISTRICT TO DISTRICT, AND EVEN WITHIN SCHOOLS. COURSES LABELED “ADVANCED” ARE NOT ALWAYS SO, THEY CONTEND.

“WE’VE COLLECTED EXAMPLES WITHIN THE SAME SCHOOL AND THE SAME COURSE TITLE OF HUGE DIFFERENCES IN THE ASSIGNMENTS AND THE EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENTS,” SAID DARIA L. HALL, THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR FOR K-12 POLICY DEVELOPMENT FOR THE WASHINGTON-BASED EDUCATION TRUST, WHICH PROMOTES HIGH ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN. “WHEN WE SEE THAT MORESTUDENTS ARE TAKINGMORE ADVANCED COURSES, BUT THAT THEIR ACHIEVEMENT IS NOT INCREASING, IT’S A SIGN THAT THEY ARE NOT GETTING WHAT THEY NEED OUT OF THOSE COURSES.”


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“The use of common tools—whether common student tasks, a core curriculum, common grading rubrics, or formative assessments—runs headlong into common conceptions of teacher professionalism. In high schools in particular, teacher professionalism is often defined primarily as autonomy—the freedom to make decisions about what, how, and sometimes even whom to teach.”

Judy Wurtzel. “Getting at the Core: New Strategies for Transforming HS Teaching and Learning. NewsLeader. NASSP, Vol. 54, No.6. February 2007, pp. 3 & 10.


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“The more you de-privatize teaching in a purposeful way, the more you improve teaching, learning, and student achievement.”

Michael Fullan. Turnaround Leadership. Jossey-Bass, 2006, p. 56.


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We’ll never be as good as we can be, or as good as we need to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”


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PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”

Rick & Becky DuFour


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Team Learning Process to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”

  • Clarify 8 – 10 Essential Common Outcomes per semester by Course/Content Area

  • Develop at least 4 Common Assessments per year

  • Establish Specific Measurable Standards or Goals

  • Analyze Results

  • Identify & Implement Improvement Strategies

Rick & Becky DuFour


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“Understandings” to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”

Schooling by Design

Wiggins & McTighe


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“Measurement Topics” to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”

Classroom Assessment and Grading that Works

Robert Marzano


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Power Standards to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”(2003)

By

Larry Ainsworth

Center for Performance Assessment

Englewood, CO


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Power Standards to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”

and

Essential Tasks


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Power Standards to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”

  • Expository Writing

  • Information Literacy

  • Citizenship/Work Habits

  • Thinking & Reasoning


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Results Now to be, as long as the ruling metaphor for the American high school is “a collection of educational entrepreneurs held together by a common parking lot.”Mike Schmoker

  • What are the leadership implications of what Schmoker is suggesting?

  • What role does Marzano’s G. & V. Curriculum play in Schmoker’s concept of leadership?

  • How would a shift to Schmoker-style leadership change how leaders in your school (s) spend their time?

  • How do leaders in your school (s) monitor effective instruction? Would Schmoker approve?


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Monitoring Implementation— Ensuring that Teams of teachers:

  • Build shared knowledge about the most essential learning by collaboratively studying state standards, district curriculum guides, state and district assessment instruments, student performance on past assessments, the recommendations of teachers in the next grade level or course, and so on.

  • Identify and commit to teach the most essential outcomes or “power standards.”

  • Develop a plan to ensure common pacing of the curriculum.


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Monitoring…(Continued) teachers:

  • Create frequent formative assessments to monitor each student’s learning.

  • Establish a common standard to determine proficiency and establish agreed-upon criteria to be used in assessing the quality of student work.

  • Analyze the results from each formative assessment and develop a plan to address areas of concern both for students in general as well as for individual students.

    DuFour, Eaker, and DuFour. On CommonGround, pp. 228-9.


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“Stop asking me if we’re almost there. teachers:

We’re nomads for crying out loud!”



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There are two ways to improve results- - redesign your school based on best practices, or get different kids.





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“Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming- - wow- - what a ride!”

Author Unknown


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Leadership in today’s high schools is not a journey to retirement with the intention of arriving safely, without risk, with all that is now familiar in tact, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming- - wow- - we’ve closed the gap- - what a ride!


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Leadership for What Works in Schools: retirement with the intention of arriving safely, without risk, with all that is now familiar in tact, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming- - wow- - we’ve closed the gap- - what a ride!Closing the Gap Between Common Sense and Common Practice


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Tim Westerberg retirement with the intention of arriving safely, without risk, with all that is now familiar in tact, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming- - wow- - we’ve closed the gap- - what a ride!

School Improvement Coach

P.O. Box 2901

Dillon, CO 80435

970.389.6220

Westerberg_1@msn.com