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3.0 Developing a Bibliography PowerPoint Presentation
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3.0 Developing a Bibliography

3.0 Developing a Bibliography

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3.0 Developing a Bibliography

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  1. Theological Research Methods RES 536 3.0 Developing a Bibliography

  2. 3.1 Library Research Tools 1. Specialized encyclopedias and dictionaries such as the Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Dictionary of Computing. (Anchor Bible Dictionary, Interpreter’s Bible Dictionary, International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, etc.)‏

  3. 3.1 Library Research Tools 2. Computerized catalogs, including computerized bibliographies and databases. In a larger library, these can direct you to specialized resources….

  4. 3.1 Library Research Tools 3. Specialized bibliographies, abstracts of articles, books, and dissertations, reviews of the year’s work in a particular field.

  5. 3.1 Library Research Tools • Religion Index One: Periodicals; A Subject Index to Periodical Literature, Including an Author Index, with Abstracts, and a Book Review Index [RIO]

  6. 3.1 Library Research Tools • Catholic Periodical and Literature Index • Religious and Theological Abstracts • O.T. Abstracts, N.T. Abstracts • Christian Periodical Index

  7. 3.1 Library Research Tools • Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature • Biography Index • Who’s Who in Religion • Elenchus Bibliographicus Biblicus

  8. 3.2 Internet Research Tools 1. Search Engines • Google Scholar • Google Blog Search

  9. 2. Specialty Searches & Link Collections: • 2.1 Religious Studies Web Guide

  10. 2.2 Computer Assisted Theology

  11. 2.3 THEOLDI: Theologische Literaturdokumentation der Universität Innsbruck

  12. 2.4 Bildi – Bibelwissenschaftliche literaturdokumentation Innsbruk

  13. 2.5 Wabash Center – Internet Guide / Resources

  14. 3.2.3 Internet: Libraries 1. Library of Congress

  15. 3.2.3 Internet: Libraries 2. Emory Library – EUCLID System

  16. 3.2.3 Internet: Libraries 3. Calvin College – Hekman Library

  17. 3.2.3 Internet: Libraries 3. CBC, U.S.A.

  18. 3.2.3 Internet: Libraries 4. Harvard University

  19. 3.2.3 Internet: Libraries 5. Library of Congress Online Catalogue

  20. 3.2.3 Internet: Libraries 6. Princeton Theological Seminary

  21. 3.2.4 Internet: Repositories 1. Registry of Open Access Repositories (ROAR)‏

  22. 3.2.4 Internet: Repositories 2. SCIRUS – for Scientific Information Only

  23. 3.2.4 Internet: Repositories 3. DOAJ – Directory of Open Access Journals

  24. 3.3 Types of Sources 1. PRIMARY SOURCES: These are the materials that you are directly writing about, the “raw materials” of your research. In fields that study writers or documents, the texts you write about are primary sources. In fields such as English or history, you usually cannot write a research paper without using primary sources. [Craft of Research, 69]

  25. 3.3 Types of Sources 2. SECONDARY SOURCES: These are books and articles in which other researchers report the results of their research based on primary data or sources. You quote or cite them to support your own research. If a researcher quoted your paper to support his argument, your paper would be his secondary source. If, on the other hand, he were writing your biography, your paper would be a primary source.

  26. 3.3 Types of Sources 3. TERTIARY SOURCES: These are books and articles based on secondary sources, on the research of others. Tertiary sources synthesize and explain research in a field for a popular audience or simply restate what others have said. Tertiary sources can be helpful in the early stages of your research, but they make weak support for your argument because they often oversimplify and over-generalize, are seldom up to date, and are usually distrusted by experts.

  27. 3.4 Sources & More Sources 1. Online Bibliographies

  28. 3.4 Sources & More Sources 2. Browsing the Stack

  29. 3.4 Sources & More Sources 3. Following a foot/endnote

  30. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1. Commentaries Series on the Entire Bible: 1.1 Hermeneia: A Critical and Historical Commentary on the Bible, Fortress Press (Minneapolis)‏

  31. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1. Commentaries Series on the Entire Bible: 1.2 Word Biblical Commentary (WBC)‏

  32. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1. Commentaries Series on the Entire Bible: 1.3 The International Critical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments (ICC)‏

  33. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1.4 Anchor Bible (AB)‏

  34. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1.5a The Interpreter’s Bible: The Holy Scriptures in the King James and Revised Standard Versions with General Articles and Introduction, Exegesis, Exposition for Each Book of the Bible (IB) • Digital CD-Rom edition

  35. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1.5b The New Interpreter’s Bible • Digital version

  36. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1.6 New Century Bible Commentary (Grand Rapids)‏ 1.7 Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching

  37. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1.8 Continental Commentary Series 1.9 New International Commentary on the O.T./N.T.

  38. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 1.10 Westminster Bible Companion 1.11 Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture

  39. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 2. Series on the Old Testament: 2.1 Old Testament Library (OTL)‏ 2.2 Keil & Delitzch, Commentary on the Old Testament (CD-Rom)‏ • Several digitized versions out.

  40. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 2. Series on the Old Testament: 2.3 Tanakh, JPS 2.4 International Theological Commentary 2.5 The Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries (TOTC).

  41. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 3. Series on the New Testament: 3.1 The Tyndale New Testament Commentaries (TNTC)‏ 3.2 The New International Greek Testament Commentary

  42. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 4. The Use of Commentaries: 4.1 "Commentaries are valuable aids, if properly used, but they are not meant to relieve the interpreter of the task of making his own commentary on the sacred text." [Danker, p. 305]

  43. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 4.2 "A cordial suspicion of commentators is therefore the first rule in approaching them for exegetical assistance. Question the structure of their proof. Determine how well they construct the case for their own interpretations and how fairly they dispose of the interpretations of others." [Danker, p. 305]

  44. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 4.3 "Bristle when a critic says 'unconvincing,' without demonstrating why the adverse decision is made. You may be exposed to a cheap shot. Check commentators’ parallel passages in context. Does the concordance reflect a discriminating use of all the linguistic data? How do the theological and philosophical presuppositions of the commentator affect the exposition?" [Danker, p. 305]

  45. 3.5 Commentaries & their Usage 4.4 "It is wise, then, after you have made your own thorough interpretations of the text… to check your interpretations against those of theirs, to re-evaluate if necessary, and to supplement if possible." [Danker, p. 306]