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The Western Hemisphere Transport Initiative 9 th Executive Committee Meeting Kingston, Jamaica August 23 rd – 24 th 2 PowerPoint Presentation
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The Western Hemisphere Transport Initiative 9 th Executive Committee Meeting Kingston, Jamaica August 23 rd – 24 th 2006 Road Traffic Injuries – Staggering Global Crisis Paul Anthony Clemetson BSc, MBA Director, Road Safety Unit Ministry of Housing, Transport, Water and Works

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The Western Hemisphere Transport Initiative9th Executive Committee MeetingKingston, Jamaica August 23rd – 24th 2006

Road Traffic Injuries – Staggering Global Crisis

Paul Anthony Clemetson BSc, MBA

Director, Road Safety Unit

Ministry of Housing, Transport, Water and Works

road traffic injuries a modern plague slipping under the radar
Road Traffic Injuries—a modern plague—slipping under the radar
  • Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs) take approximately 1.2 million lives per year

- 3,287 deaths/day or

- one death every 26.3 seconds

  • 20-50 million people are seriously injured each year.

- 15 or more serious injuries/second or

- over 900 serious injuries/minute

Source: World Health Report 2004.

Chart reproduced from Jacobs G, Aeron-Thomas A, Astrop A. Estimating global road fatalities. Crowthorne, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000 (TRL Report 445).

road traffic injuries a modern plague
Road Traffic Injuries – a Modern Plague
  • For men aged 15-44 road traffic injuries rank second (behind HIV/AIDS) as the leading cause of premature death and ill health worldwide.
  • 10th leading cause of death globally.
  • Low and middle income countries account for more than 75% of global deaths from road traffic crashes.
  • Responsible for 2.2% of annual global deaths.
fatality rates are notably higher in developing countries

Viet Nam

1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500

Kenya

1,786

1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500

1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500

U.S.

3,181

66

Fatality rates are notably higher in developing countries

Fatalities per 10,000 Crashes

Source: Reich MR, Nantulya V. Road Traffic Injuries in Developing Countries: Strategies for Prevention and Control. Presented at the Road Traffic Injuries and Health Equity Conference, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, April 10-12, 2002.

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Mortality rate per 100,000 inhabitanats 1990 - 2002

*Figure for 1998 is the average of values for 1997 and 1999.

Sources: Canada—Rates calculated with fat. from Transport Canada and pop. from Statistics Canada (pop. for 1998 estimated using trend in rest of pop. figures); Mexico – INEGI (data presented in Foro Nacional Sobre Accidentes de Tránsito en México); United States – NHTSA and U.S. Bureau of the Census.

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25.0

20.0

15.0

10.0

5.0

0.0

Mortality rate per 100,000 inhabitanats 1990 - 2002

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2.9

10.8

16.2

12.5

14.6

Cayman Islands

18.5

17.7

17.8

15.6

14.7

13.6

14.6

13.9

11.4

12.9

13.8

15.5

14.8

Jamaica

15.5

16.4

17.2

17.1

17.1

17.1

17.5

16.4

14.8

16.2

16.3

14.4

14.6

Puerto Rico

15.9

14.3

16.1

16.5

15.6

17.4

15.8

14.3

14.1

17.1

Saint Lucia

10.1

12.0

10.2

10.8

11.2

10.1

Trinidad and Tobago

road traffic injuries in latin america and the caribbean are alarming
Road Traffic Injuries in Latin America and the Caribbean are alarming
  • Latin America and the Caribbean have the highest RTI fatality rate of any region of the world (26.1 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants).
  • This fatality rate is expected to climb 48% by 2020 so that the region is still predicted to have the highest rate in 2020.
  • Colombia’s crash mortality rate rose 237% between 1975-1998.
  • El Salvador has the highest road traffic fatality rate in the world (42.4 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants)
  • By 2002, death rate from RTI in Latin America and the Caribbean is expected to surpass death rate by HIV/AIDS

Sources: The World Report on Road Traffic Injury Prevention, 2004; Kopits E and Cropper M. Traffic fatalities and economic growth. Washington, DC: The World Bank, 2003 (Policy Research Working Paper No. 3035).

rtis are an enormous barrier to development
RTIs are an enormous barrier to development
  • The direct cost of road crashes was approximately US$518 in 2000.
  • On average, crash costs equal 1-1.5% of developing nations’ annual GDP.
  • Crashes cost developing nations US$65 billion,and US$18.9 billion in Latin America and the Caribbean—more than double the amount of annual development assistance the region received.

Source: Jacobs, Aeron-Thomas, and Astrop, 2000

rtis are an enormous barrier to development13
RTIs are an enormous barrier to development
  • In Jamaica direct costs of road crashes to the health sector was approximately J$518 in 2002.
  • Cost per patient varied form J$3,00 - $128,000
  • Cost to the Motor Vehicle Insurance Industry exceeded J$3 billion

Source: Division of Health Promotion and Protection - MOH

we should learn the lessons from aids
We should learn the lessons from AIDS
  • The public health community failed to respond adequately to the problem while it was growing rapidly in developing nations.
  • The world now faces the worst public health disaster it has witnessed
  • We risk making the same mistake now in road safety.
  • The number of those killed in crashes annually is already 42% of the number killed by HIV/AIDS.
  • Very little is being committed by the U.S. or other developed nations to road safety in developing countries.
similar to hiv aids
Similar to HIV/AIDS
  • Deaths from the RTI pandemic is increasing globally
  • The highest growth rates are in developing countries
  • Forecast for the future is dismal
    • 83% increase in fatalities in developing countries by 2020
    • RTI threaten to become the #1 cause of premature death in the region.
we must act now
We must act now
  • We must get ahead of this plague now - before the predicted explosion takes place.
  • We missed one of the worst public health disasters of our lifetime with AIDS. Will we miss another?
  • “The biggest single failure in the fight against AIDS in the first 15 years of the pandemic, was the failure to collaborate.” — Dr. Michael Merson, former Dean, Yale School of Public Health
  • We cannot let what happened to the AIDS epidemic happen to road traffic injuries.
some imperatives
Some Imperatives
  • Establish a dynamic, sustainable regional corpse to coordinate and evaluate strategies and policies for RTI reduction
  • Build local capacity to address road safety (drawing on multi-sectoral collaboration - civil society, the private sector and all relevant government sectors)
  • Build a network to share knowledge and generate political will
  • Develop and establish a common data system for sharing data and best practices
  • Develop regional and national plans and policies supported by Ministerial endorsements
  • Sustain ongoing efforts to implement regional and national plans and programmes
no time for complacency
No time for complacency
  • “When you accept any injury as inevitable, you are on the road to failure.”

quoted by: Sir Don Berwick

  • Every system is perfectly designed to produce exactly the results it produces (is that the reason why RTIs are out of proportion?)
  • Let us create the will to succeed
  • Use our hearts and our heads
  • Act quickly and deliberately
  • Work collaboratively
ministry of housing transport water works
MINISTRY OF HOUSING, TRANSPORT, WATER & WORKS

Road Safety Unit Contact Information

Paul Anthony Clemetson, BSc, MBA1876-960–8575

pclemetson@mtw.gov.jm; paulclemetson876@yahoo.com

Ministry of Housing, Transport, Water & Works 1876-754-2584 -90

www.mhtww.gov.jm

Road Safety Unit 145 Maxfield Avenue Kingston 10, Jamaica WI

rsu@mhtww.gov.jm