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PRESENTATION ON THIRSTY CROP BY WWF-INDIA. Structure of Presentation. Water & Agriculture Water Consumption by Thirsty Crop Thirsty Crops Challenges Addressing the Challenges Framework Project Area Area Description Project Process Results Project Outcome

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Presentation Transcript
slide2

Structure of Presentation

  • Water & Agriculture
  • Water Consumption by Thirsty Crop
  • Thirsty Crops
  • Challenges
  • Addressing the Challenges
  • Framework
  • Project Area
  • Area Description
  • Project Process
  • Results
  • Project Outcome
  • Project Potential
  • Project Impact
slide3

Water & Agriculture in India

  • Irrigation consumes more than 80% of the available water in the country

Source: indiastat.com (1997)

slide4

Water & Agriculture in India (cont)

  • Changing trend of water availability… evident from adequate to stress and will strike to scarcity within a span of 75 years
slide6

……..WHY THIRSTY ARE SOME CROPS

  • Heavy requirement of water per unit yield of produce
    • Blue water
    • Green Water
    • Grey water
  • Identified Thirsty Crops
    • Sugarcane: 1500 – 3000 litres/kg of cane
    • Cotton: 7000 – 29000 litres/kg of fibre
    • Rice: 3000 – 5000 litres/kg of grain
  • Basis of identification
    • Usage of water
    • Usage of inputs and thereby losses
    • Area under cultivation
slide7

Challenges

  • PRODUCE MORE WITH LESS
    • Proper farm water management
    • Introducing concept of Integrated Plant Nutrient Management
    • Promote practice of Integrated Pest Management at farm level
slide8

Addressing the Challenges

  • WWF-India’s Initiative
    • Sustainable Cotton Initiative Project in Andhra Pradesh & Maharastra
    • Sustainable Sugar Initiative Project in Maharastra
framework

Available Water

Fertilizer

Impact

Water to be retained for other ecosystem functions

Market transforming towards sustainable production base

Improved livelihoods for the producer

Pesticide

Outcome

Farmers adapted to BMPs

The concept of producing better cotton/sugar gaining momentum

Results

Improve water productivity

Reduction in chemical input

Improve in gross margin

Thirsty Crop

Better Management Practices on Thirsty Crop

FRAMEWORK
slide10

Project Area

  • Warrangal (Andhra Pradesh)
  • Aurangabad (Maharastra)
implementation approach
Implementation Approach

AREA DESCRIPTION

  • Dominated by crops like Paddy, Cotton & Sugarcane
  • Region is marked by huge consumption of chemical pesticide (ranging from 30 – 50% of the respective state consumption)
  • Traditional water use in agriculture taking a heavy toll on ground water (e.g. flood irrigation, serpentine furrows)
  • Majority of the area is technically unintervened
  • Area comes under Godavari basin, a priority basin for WWF agri & water works
implementation approach12
Implementation Approach

PROJECT PROCESS

  • Development of Better Management Practices for each of the thirsty crops under the following guiding principles
    • Improving water productivity
    • Reduction in chemical fertilizers
    • Lessening use of pesticides
    • Improving gross margin of the farmers
implementation approach13
Implementation Approach

PROJECT PROCESS (Cont)

  • Demonstration of trial plot
  • Raising of Demonstration plot
  • BMP demonstrated through implementing partners
  • Awareness campaign through Farmers’ Field School

/Learning Group/Farmers’ Group

  • Creating Resource Centre
  • Formation of Society under Cooperative act
  • Outcome monitored by M&E partner
slide14

RESULTS

Sugarcane

  • 48% of water reduction in BMP fields
  • Improvement in juice quality
  • 21% of reduction in chemical fertilizer
  • An extra profit of Rs 4700/- per acre/BMP farmer

(Source: NABARD report)

Cotton

  • 49.4% of water reduction in BMP fields
  • 81% lessening of chemical pesticides in BMP field
  • 18% of reduction in chemical fertilizer
  • An extra profit of Rs 4000/- per acre/BMP farmer

(Source: CRIDA report)

implementation approach15
Implementation Approach

PROJECT OUTCOME

  • Around 17000 ha of cotton growing area & 8000 ha of cane area would be under BMP
  • Farmers’ shifting towards micro irrigation to improve water productivity & profit per unit of water
  • The success story has laid down the concept of producing better cotton/sugar through an environmentally sustainable crop production system….and gaining momentum
  • Industry promoting practices which is environmentally sustainable
implementation approach16
Implementation Approach

PROJECT POTENTIAL

Project Potential

  • Water use efficiency : 75 – 90%
  • 14.7 BCM of water can be saved annually in cotton cultivation
  • 37 BCM of water can be saved annually in cane cultivation

Usual Scenario

  • Water use efficiency : 40 – 50%
  • 30 BCM of water annually is provided to cotton
  • 78 BCM of water annually is provided to sugarcane crop
implementation approach17
Implementation Approach

PROJECT IMPACT

  • Water to be retained for functioning of other ecosystem services
  • Water quality to be restored
  • Improved livelihoods for the farmers
  • Attaining commodity market stability through optimum resource utilization