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Eye Protection An Overview of What Employers Should Know. This module will cover…. The scope of the eye injury problem What contributes to eye injuries at work? What causes eye injuries at work? Where do injuries happen most often? How can eye injuries be prevented?

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Eye protection an overview of what employers should know

Eye ProtectionAn Overview of What Employers Should Know


This module will cover
This module will cover…

  • The scope of the eye injury problem

  • What contributes to eye injuries at work?

  • What causes eye injuries at work?

  • Where do injuries happen most often?

  • How can eye injuries be prevented?

  • How employers can comply with WISHA rules


The scope of the problem
The scope of the problem

In 2002, there were 42,286 occupational injuries or illnesses involving the eye that resulted in days away from work in the U.S.

Number of nonfatal occupational facial injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by part of the face, 2002

Body Part Number of cases Percent of cases

Face 60,064 100.0

Eyes 42,286 70.4

Face, unspecified 4,445 7.4

Forehead 3,887 6.5

Nose, nasal cavity 3,031 5.0

Multiple face locations 2,430 4.0

Mouth 2,072 3.4

Jaw or chin 906 1.5

Cheek(s) 736 1.2

Face, other 272 0.5

NOTE: Due to rounding, components do not add to exactly 100 percent.

A link to eye injury statistics is in the links page at the end of this slide show


What contributes to eye injuries at work
What contributes to eye injuries at work?

Take a moment to think about possible eye hazards at your workplace. A survey by the Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of about 1,000 minor eye injuries revealed how and why many on-the-job accidents occur. Employee were either:

Not wearing eye protection. BLS reports that nearly three out of every five workers injured were not wearing eye protection at the time of the accident.

OR

Wearing the wrong kind of eye protection for the job. About 40% of the injured workers were wearing some form of inadequate eye protection when the accident occurred and were injured.

A fictional account of a typical eye injury called “How Accidents Happen” can be linked to in the Links page at the end of this presentation


What causes eye injuries at work
What causes eye injuries at work?

Flying particles

BLS found that almost 70% of the accidents studies resulted from flying or falling objects or sparks striking the eye. Injured workers estimated that nearly three-fifths of the objects were smaller than a pin head. Most of the particles were said to be traveling faster than a hand-thrown object when the accident occurred.

Contact with chemicals

Splashed liquids or flying chemical particles caused 20% of the injuries.

Other accidents

Caused by objects swinging from a fixed or attached position, like tree limbs, ropes, chains, or tools which were pulled into the eye while the worker was using them.


Where do injuries happen most often
Where do injuries happen most often?

Potential eye hazards can be found in nearly every industry, but BLS reported that more than 40% of injuries occurred among craft workers, like mechanics, repairers, carpenters, and plumbers.

Over a third of the injured workers were equipment operators, such as assemblers, sanders, and grinding machine operators.

Laborers suffered about one-fifth of the eye injuries.

Almost half the injured workers were employed in manufacturing.

Slightly more than 20% were in construction.


How can eye injuries be prevented
How can eye injuries be prevented?

Better training and education.

BLS reported that most workers were hurt while doing their regular jobs.

Workers injured while not wearing protective eye wear most often said they believed it was not required by the situation.

Even though the vast majority of employers furnished eye protection at no cost to employees, about 40% of the workers received no information on where and what kind of eyewear should be used.

Maintenance.

Eye protection devices must be properly maintained.

Scratched and dirty devices reduce vision, cause glare and may contribute to accidents.

Always wear effective eye protection.

To be effective, eye wear must appropriate for the hazard encountered and properly fitted.



Description and use of eye face protectors
Description and use of Eye/Face Protectors

Glasses

Protective eyeglasses are made with

  • safety frames

  • tempered glass or plastic lenses

  • temples and side shields

    They provide eye protection from moderate impact and particles encountered in job tasks such as:

  • carpentry

  • woodworking

  • grinding,

  • scaling, etc.

    Safety glasses are also available in prescription form for those persons who need corrective lenses.


Description and use of eye face protectors1
Description and use of Eye/Face Protectors

Goggles

Vinyl framed goggles of soft pliable body

design provide adequate eye protection from many

hazards.

These goggles are available with

  • clear or tinted lenses

  • perforated, port vented, or non-vented frames.

    Single lens goggles provide similar protection

    to spectacles and may be worn in combination with

    spectacles or corrective lenses to insure protection

    along with proper vision.

    Welders goggles provide protection from sparking, scaling, or splashing metals and harmful light rays. Lenses are impact resistant and are available in graduated shades of filtration.

    Chippers/Grinders goggles provide eye protection from flying particles. The dual protective eye cups house impact resistant clear lenses with individual cover.


Description and use of eye face protectors2
Description and use of Eye/Face Protectors

Face Shields

These normally consist of an adjustable headgear and face shield of tinted or transparent acetate or polycarbonate materials, or wire screen.

Face shields are available in various sizes, tensile strength, impact/heat resistance and light ray filtering capacity.

Face shields will be used in operations when the entire face needs protection and should be worn to protect eyes and face against flying particles, metal sparks, and chemical/biological splash.


Description and use of eye face protectors3
Description and use of Eye/Face Protectors

Welding Shields

These shield assemblies consist of vulcanized fiber or glass fiber body, a ratchet/button type adjustable headgear or cap attachment and a filter and cover plate holder.

These shields will be provided to protect workers’ eyes and face from infrared or radiant light burns, flying sparks, metal spatter and slag chips encountered during welding, brazing, soldering, resistance welding, bare or shielded electric arc welding and oxyacetylene

welding and cutting operations.


Wisha rules on eye protection
WISHA rules on eye protection

WAC 296-800-16040

You must require your employees to use necessary PPE on the job

WAC 296-800-16045

PPE must be kept in safe and good condition

WAC 296-800-16050

You must make sure your employees use appropriate eye and face protection

Links to WISHA’s guide for complying with PPE rules are in the links page at the end of this slide show


Wac 296 800 16040 require your employees to use necessary ppe on the job
WAC 296-800-16040Require your employees to use necessary PPE on the job

You must require your employees to use necessary PPE on the job.


Wac 296 800 16045 keep ppe in safe and good condition
WAC 296-800-16045 Keep PPE in safe and good condition

Make sure all PPE is safe for the work to be performed. It must:

- Be durable.

- Fit snugly.

- Not interfere with the employee’s movements.

Make sure PPE is used and maintained in a clean and reliable condition.

  • Defective equipment MUST NOT be used

    Make sure if employees provide their own PPE, that it is adequate for the workplace hazards, and maintained in a clean and reliable condition.


Wac 296 800 16050 make sure your employees use appropriate eye and face protection
WAC 296-800-16050Make sure your employees use appropriate eye and face protection

Make sure that employees exposed to hazards that could injure their eyes and/or face use appropriate protection. Examples of these hazards include:

- Flying particles.

- Molten metal.

- Liquid chemicals.

- Acids or caustic liquids.

- Chemical gases or vapors.

- Any light that could injure the eyes such as lasers, ultraviolet, or infrared light.

  • Objects that puncture.

    Make sure employees exposed to hazards from flying objects have eye protection with side protection, such as safety glasses with clip-on or slide-on side shields.


Wac 296 800 16050 continued make sure your employees use appropriate eye and face protection
WAC 296-800-16050 (continued)Make sure your employees use appropriate eye and face protection

  • Make sure eye protection for employees who wear prescription lenses:

    • - Incorporates the prescription into the design of the eye protection; or

    • Is large enough to be worn over the prescription lenses without disturbing them.

  • Make sure PPE used to protect the eyes and face meet the following specific ANSI (American National Standards Institute) standards.  Most commercially available PPE is marked with the specific ANSI requirements.

    • - PPE bought before February 20, 1995, must meet ANSI standard Z87.1-1968.

    • - PPE bought on or after February 20, 1995, must meet ANSI standard Z87.1-1989.

    • - If you use eye or face protection that does not meet these ANSI standards, you must show they are equally effective.


Links
Links

WISHA Core Rules PPE

Eye injury statistics

“How Accidents Happen”

A Guide to complying with WISHA’s PPE Rules