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Chapter 2: Understanding and conceptualizing interaction

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  1. Chapter 2: Understanding and conceptualizing interaction

  2. Understanding the problem space • What do you want to create? • What are your assumptions? • What are your claims?

  3. A framework for analyzing the problem space • Are there problems with an existing product or user experience? • Why do you think there are problems? • How do you think your proposed design ideas might overcome these? • When designing for a new user experience how will the proposed design extend or change current ways of doing things?

  4. Conceptual model • “a high-level description of how a system is organized and operates.” (Johnson and Henderson, 2002, p. 26)

  5. Main components • Metaphors and Analogies. • Concepts • Relationships • Concept  User Experience Goals.

  6. Benefits • How do users understand the interaction model? • Not to become narrowly focused early on • Establish a set of common terms they all understand and agree upon • Reduce the chance of misunderstandings and confusion arising later on

  7. A classic conceptual model: the spreadsheet • Analogous to ledger sheet • Interactive and computational • Easy to understand • Greatly extending what accountants and others could do www.bricklin.com/history/refcards.htm

  8. The Star interface

  9. Interface metaphors • Designed to be similar to a physical entity but also has own properties • e.g. desktop metaphor, search engine

  10. Benefits of interface metaphors • Makes learning new systems easier • Helps users understand the underlying conceptual model

  11. Problems with interface metaphors (Nelson, 1990) • Break conventional and cultural rules • e.g., recycle bin placed on desktop • Can constrain designers in the way they conceptualize a problem space • Conflict with design principles • Forces users to only understand the system in terms of the metaphor • Designers can inadvertently use bad existing designs and transfer the bad parts over

  12. Interaction types • Instructing • Conversing • Manipulating • Exploring

  13. Instructing • Where users instruct a system by telling it what to do • e.g., tell the time, print a file, find a photo • Very common interaction type underlying a range of devices and systems

  14. Conversing • Like having a conversation with another human • Examples include search engines, advice-giving systems and help systems

  15. Manipulating • Exploit’s users’ knowledge of how they move and manipulate in the physical world • Virtual objects can be manipulated by moving, selecting, opening, and closing them

  16. Direct manipulation • Proposes that digital objects be designed so they can be interacted with analogous to how physical objects are manipulated

  17. Core principles of DM • Continuous representation of objects and actions of interest • Physical actions and button pressing instead of issuing commands with complex syntax • Rapid reversible actions with immediate feedback on object of interest

  18. Why are DM interfaces so enjoyable? • Novices can learn the basic functionality quickly • Experienced users can work extremely rapidly to carry out a wide range of tasks, even defining new functions • Intermittent users can retain operational concepts over time • Error messages rarely needed • Immediate feedback • Users gain confidence and mastery and feel in control

  19. What are the disadvantages with DM? • Not all tasks can be described by objects and not all actions can be done directly • Some tasks are better achieved through delegating rather than manipulating • e.g., spell checking • Moving a mouse around the screen can be slower than pressing function keys to do same actions

  20. Exploring • Involves users moving through virtual or physical environments

  21. A virtual world

  22. A CAVE