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The WAN mission Defending and promoting press freedom - and the economic independence of newspapers Developing newspaper publishing world-wide: information and idea exchange on producing better and more profitable newspapers

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the wan mission
The WAN mission

Defending and promoting press freedom - and the economic independence of newspapers

Developing newspaper publishing world-wide: information and idea exchange on producing better and more profitable newspapers

Representing the industry in all international discussions on media issues: protecting the professional and business interests of newspapers

wan membership
WAN Membership

WAN represents more than

18,000

Newspapers on the five continents

  • 71 national newspaper associations
  • Individual publishers and editors in 100 countries
  • 17 national and international news agencies
  • 8 regional press organizations
wan activity sectors supported by the sfn strategic partners
WAN - Activity sectors supported by the SFN strategic partners

Training and Events Division: to help newspapers increase readership and sustain and increase avertising and other revenues

World Editors Forum:providing editors with opportunities to exchange ideas and information on the business of editing newspapers

Young Reader Project:encouraging the culture of reading newspapers through programmes aimed at the young

Fund for Press Freedom Development:promoting the growth of strong independent newspapers in developing and transitional markets

And the major inititative:

slide7

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper sets out to analyse and promote all major operational and strategic developments for the press industry.

SFN delivers essential planning and implementation tools to newspaper publishers, editors and managers worldwide.

slide8

SFN subscribers and WAN members receive exclusive access to:

  • Strategy Reports as they are published
  • Resources - Research techniques - Business models
  • Data & Information - Trends in circulation, advertising and much more
  • Business ideas, the latest case studies and research
  • News and access via links to related topics
  • E-mail forums
  • Contacts with the SFN strategic business partners
six reports available now
Six reports available now
  • The tailored newspaper
  • Successful customer relationship management
  • Strategies for a converging world
  • Internet strategies for newspapers revisited
  • Editorial measurement - A practical option?
  • The Value Driven Newspaper
six reports available now10
Six reports available now
  • The tailored newspaper
  • Successful customer relationship management
  • Strategies for a converging world
  • Internet strategies for newspapers revisited
  • Editorial measurement - A practical option?
  • The Value Driven Newspaper
reports in preparation
Reports in preparation
  • Added value advertising
  • The distribution revolution
  • The role of the newspaper
  • Diversification strategies
research world press trends
Research -World Press Trends
  • WAN is the only institution in the world collecting and publishing data and trends on an annual basis
  • Circulation
  • Market penetration
  • Sales and advertising revenues
  • Advertising expenditure
  • Taxes
  • Subsidies
  • Ownership regulations
  • Newspaper formats
  • Printing capacity
changing newspapers in a changing world

Changing newspapers in a changing world.

Go to

futureofthenewspaper.com

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow five year circulation trend
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowFive year circulation trend

% variance

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow copies per capita
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowCopies per capita

/ hundred adults

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow average circulation
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowAverage circulation

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow circulation mix
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowCirculation mix

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

% subscription

30

% single copy

20

10

0

Italy

Spain

Ireland

Finland

Norway

Greece

Portugal

Belgium

Sweden

Germany

Denmark

Switzerland

Netherlands

Luxembourg

United Kingdom

% single copy

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow impact of subscription on circulation
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowImpact of subscription on circulation

15.0

Estonia

Croatia

Brazil

10.0

Malaysia

5.0

Ireland

% variance - 1994 - 1999

Colombia

Spain

Japan

France

Norway

0.0

Italy

Finland

Switzerland

0.0

10.0

20.0

30.0

40.0

50.0

60.0

70.0

80.0

90.0

100.0

Belgium

-USA

-Iceland

Latvia

Germany

UK

-5.0

Denmark

Netherlands

China

Greece

Sweden

Luxembourg

-10.0

% of sale from subscription

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow impact of subscriptions on circulation
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowImpact of subscriptions on circulation

Source: World Press Trends

key indicators impact of gdp on newspaper circulation
Key indicatorsimpact of GDP on newspaper circulation

Relationship between newspaper popularity and per capita GDP

Norway

700

Japan

600

Finland

Sweden

500

Switzerland

United-Kingdom

400

Germany

Newspaper sales per capita

Austria

Denmark

Netherlands

300

United-States

Thailand

Estonia

Canada

New-Zealand

Bulgaria

200

Hungary

Ireland

Australia

Czechia

Russia

Belgium

Latvia

Malaysia

Spain

Italy

100

Romania

Greece

Brazil

India

Poland

Mongolia

0

0

5000

10000

15000

20000

25000

30000

35000

GDP per capita

Source: World Press Trends/World Bank

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow five year advertising trend
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowFive year advertising trend

% variance

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow advertising off take copy
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowAdvertising off-take / copy

Advertising

revenue /

ABC Copy (€)

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow variance in advertising share
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowVariance in advertising share

+/-% variance

Source: Zenith media

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow classified share of newspaper advertising
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowClassified share of newspaper advertising

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

% display

30

% classified

20

10

0

Italy

Spain

Ireland

France

Finland

Portugal

Sweden

Denmark

Netherlands

Luxembourg

United Kingdom

Source: World Press Trends

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow advertising as a percentage of revenues
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowAdvertising as a percentage of revenues

Source: World Press Trends

key indicators impact of gdp on newspaper advertising
Key indicatorsimpact of GDP on newspaper advertising

Relationship between ad-offtake and per capita GDP

United-States

800

700

600

Ireland

500

Australia

Ad revenue per copy

Switzerland

New-Zealand

400

Norway

Denmark

Spain

Canada

Sweden

300

Netherlands

Germany

Italy

Austria

Belgium

Finland

Greece

United-Kingdom

200

Brazil

Malaysia

Japan

100

Czechia

Hungary

Poland

Estonia

Thailand

Latvia

Mongolia

Romania

India

Russia

0

Bulgaria

0

5000

10000

15000

20000

25000

30000

35000

GDP per capita

Source: Zenith Media/World Bank

key indicators impact of gdp on newspaper circulation29
Key indicatorsimpact of GDP on newspaper circulation

Relationship between newspaper popularity and per capita GDP

Norway

700

Japan

600

Finland

Sweden

500

Switzerland

United-Kingdom

400

Germany

Newspaper sales per capita

Austria

Denmark

Netherlands

300

United-States

Thailand

Estonia

Canada

New-Zealand

Bulgaria

200

Hungary

Ireland

Australia

Czechia

Russia

Belgium

Latvia

Malaysia

Spain

Italy

100

Romania

Greece

Brazil

India

Poland

Mongolia

0

0

5000

10000

15000

20000

25000

30000

35000

GDP per capita

Source: World Press Trends/World Bank

key indicators influence of gdp on share of advertising
Key indicatorsInfluence of GDP on share of advertising

Finland

Denmark

Sweden

Switzerland

Malaysia

Estonia

Ireland

Germany

United

South Korea

India

Kingdom

Lithuania

Pakistan

Latvia

China

Spain

Netherlands

Italy

Franc

Belgium

Hungary

Poland

Romania

Russia

Press v TV

Influence of prosperity on media usage

Newspapers

90

TV

80

70

60

% reach

50

40

Brazil

30

20

10

25,000

-

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

30,000

Prosperity (per capita GDP)

Zenith Media/World Bank

the uk in context revenue forecasts for next five years by line
The UK in contextRevenue forecasts for next five years – by line

(excludes the impact of recruitment drift)

20

Netherlands

Finland

15

Italy

Ireland

United Kingdom

10

Portugal

France

Belgium

Luxembourg

Austria

Advertising (real prices)

5

Germany

Spain

0

Sweden

-6

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

Denmark

-5

-10

Circulation (flat revenue)

Source: World Press Forecasts

the uk in context revenue forecasts for the next five years composite
The UK in contextRevenue forecasts for the next five years - composite

(excludes the impact of recruitment drift)

Source: World Press Forecasts

the internet new media renaissance comparison of media usage usa
The Internet New media renaissanceComparison of media usage [USA]

Trends of usage levels of media

1000

800

Broadcast

Cable & Satellite

Radio

600

Home video

Hours per year spent with the medium

Recorded music

Games

Internet

400

Newspapers

Books

Magazines

200

0

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Source: Veronis Suhler

communication

Advertising growth has slowed

Communication

Growth in internet advertising.

% of all media advertising spent on the Internet

3.89

4.5

3.88

3.83

3.72

3.53

3.51

4.0

3.5

2.69

3.0

2.5

1.67

2.0

1.23

1.5

0.75

0.49

1.0

0.5

0.0

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Source: Veronis Suhler

communication36
Communication

Advertising growth has slowed Penetration and usage levels have flattened off

Growth in internet usage and advertising.

Year on year growth in hours spent and advertising spent on the Internet - USA

300

250

240

200

Rate of growth in usage

150

Internet Advertising

100

100

79

78

74

64

62

47

42

50

25

20

12

11

11

10

6

4

4

4

3

0

96/95

97/96

98/97

99/98

00/99

01/00

02/01

03/02

04/03

05/04

Source: Veronis Suhler

communication advertising growth has slowed growth levels similar to those in other media
Communication Advertising growth has slowedGrowth levels similar to those in other media

300

250

Internet

200

Television

150

Cable

Yar on year % variance

100

50

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

-50

Years of medium's evolution

Source: Forrester

communication spend per media consumption levels
Communication Spend per media consumption levels

Advertising dollars per nation hour spent with medium (USA)

Source: Interactive advertising bureau

communication new media renaissance does the internet attract advertising
Communication New media renaissance“Does the Internet attract advertising?”

Media expenditure and cost evaluation (UK)

Internet share of audience: 2%

Internet share of revenue: 4%

Source: Interactive advertising bureau

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow the myth of cannibalism
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowThe myth of cannibalism
  • Newspapers that have a website show better circulation performances than those without:
    • Circulation performances were 0.6% better
  • Magazine publishers use the Internet more effectively than newspaper publishers to build circulation:
    • Those magazines that provide a lot of online content benefited disproportionately more
    • Direct correlation between the amount of information online, and the number of print subscriptions
  • Many magazines found the internet was their primary source of new subscribers.

Source: Pressflex

the newspaper industry today and tomorrow building sales from the web the new york times
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrow Building sales from the web – The New York Times
  • Generated more than 120,000 new orders from promotion on its website;
  • Banners offer incentives, including discounts and offers;
  • Targeted e-mails promote the newspaper and website to special interest groups.
the newspaper industry today and tomorrow building sales from the web berlingske dagblade
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrow Building sales from the web - Berlingske Dagblade
  • A 'pop-up' window on their site, offering a trial subscription “attracted tens of thousands of trialists”;
  • Call centre converts >25% to full-price subscription;
  • The cost of acquiring these subscribers is 10% of the norm;
  • The portal’s audience is largely non-reading under-30s.
the newspaper industry today and tomorrow building sales from the web
The newspaper industry, today and tomorrowBuilding sales from the web

Both newspapers

have generated over 4% of their subscribers

through internet promotion

consumption new media renaissance emergence of mobile europe
Consumption New media renaissance Emergence of mobile - Europe

90%

80%

70%

60%

“Text” ownership

50%

“Tex t” usage

Mobile phone

40%

4

PC

30%

20%

10%

0%

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Source: Forrester

consumption new media renaissance emergence of mobile europe45
Consumption New media renaissance Emergence of mobile - Europe

Our biggest opportunity

lies in the emergence of mobile

Community

meets content,

meets access,

meets immediacy.

consumption new media renaissance emergence of mobile europe46
“I don’t care who it is mate!

Rules are rules.”

A pilot to Tony Blair, just before take off

when the British Prime Minister

protested that he was on the phone to the Queen.

Consumption New media renaissance Emergence of mobile - Europe

The Guardian, 11 November, 2002.

consumption new media renaissance emergence of mobile europe47
Consumption New media renaissance Emergence of mobile - Europe
  • While 84% of Swedes own a mobile phone, only 40% of Americans have one
  • 20 Billion text messages were sent worldwide in 2001
  • The average Britain now spends 53 minutes a day on his/her mobile phone
  • Drivers’ reactions are a third slower when talking on a mobile than under the influence of alcohol
  • A quarter of Italians say their lack of a mobile phone causes sexual problems with their partners
  • The average Indian texter sends more than 60 messages a day.
consumption access to media
ConsumptionAccess to media

Movies

Months

Books

Magazines

Weeks

Letter

Time to

market

Newsletters

Days

Time to

Market

The media gap

Newspapers

Hours

Minutes

Television

Radio

Telephone

Seconds

1

1

10

100

1000

10000

100000

1000000

Audience

Audience

Alma Media

slide53

One of the major causes of disillusion with internet advertising is a chronic misunderstanding of how print advertising works.

the tailored newspaper why
The tailored newspaperWhy?
  • Demand from readers and advertisers is for “less better;”
    • “Only what I want”
    • “More of what I want”
    • “Where I want it when I want it”
  • The future economic relationship will be based around the effective value of the offer, rather than value of the total package
  • Takes the product in the direction of the market:
    • Less better
    • Matching content with communication with the consumer
  • Publishers must examine the most cost effective way of merging relevant content and relevant advertising.
putting the tailored newspaper to work economic rationale
Putting the tailored newspaper to work Economic rationale

Advertiser demand

for targeting

Materials costs

Available reader interest

Digital printing costs

time

the new model

The new model

The value plane

channels and markets new channels for new readers
Channels and markets New channels for new readers

Weather

80

Adult entertainment

Entertainment news

70

Technology news

General news

60

50

40

Financial information

Sports information

30

20

10

Auto information

Job listings

0

Product reviews

Property

Internet

TV

Newspaper

health information

Cinema listings

Radio

Magazine

Word of Mouth

Travel information

Personal ads

Phone

Reference information

Tv listings

Wireless

Source: Forrester

the traditional model
The traditional model

Marketing

Technology

Content

the traditional model71
The traditional model

Marketing

Technology

Content

the new model72
The new model

Matter

Function

Contextual

Personal

Niche

Regional

General

Technology

Text

Distribution

Transmission

Video

Form

Audio

Interaction

Interrogation

Data

Meta-data

Aggregation

the value plane
The value plane

Contextual

Personal

Niche

Matter

Regional

General

Technology

Text

Distribution

Transmission

Video

Function

Form

Audio

Interaction

Interrogation

Data

Meta-data

Aggregation

the value plane the content market dimension
The value planeThe content / market dimension

Contextual

Personal

Kiosk

Niche

Audio visual

Digital printing

Mobile device

“Print-distribute

PDF distribution

Regional

General

“Distribute-print”

the value plane the business model
The value planeThe business model

Subscription

Contextual

Advertising

Personal

Kiosk

Niche

Content

Audio visual

Digital printing

Mobile device

“Print-distribute

PDF distribution

Regional

General

Archive

“Distribute-print”

the value plane cross functional crm
The value planeCross-functional CRM

Subscription

Contextual

Advertising

Personal

Kiosk

Niche

Content

Audio visual

Digital printing

Mobile device

“Print-distribute

PDF distribution

Regional

General

Archive

“Distribute-print”

CRM

process

the value plane putting the tailored newspaper to work
The value planePutting the tailored newspaper to work

The tailored

newspaper

Advertising

  • Content management:
  • Sector knowledge
  • Tailoring tools
  • Channel management

Content

Niche

Digital printing

Archive

editorial evaluation

Editorial evaluation

Editorial measurement

Measuring journalists

Measuring the value of the newsroom, in an increasingly multi-media world.

editorial evaluation efficiency and economy
Editorial evaluationEfficiency and economy

“I do not believe that measurement is possible.”

“Let evaluation be done by editors.”

“Leave book-keepers and other bureaucracy out.”

“Keep measurement out of the editorial office.”

“It will spoil the atmosphere in which editors should work.”

slide80

“Reading Jim Chisholm’s ideas about how to measure the cost-effectiveness of journalists, I concluded that Jim understands less about journalism than any other professional I have come across.”

Nick Davies

The Guardian

editorial evaluation81
Editorial evaluation
  • How do we optimise the content of the newspaper to attract and retain the maximum number of profitable readers?
  • How do we produce this newspaper as efficiently and as effectively as possible?
  • How do we encourage journalists to embark on a process of continual self improvement

……… for their newspaper

……… and for themselves.

slide84
“Our page designers and sub editors are now more aware of how readers actually use the newspaper and what factors in design can influence reader traffic. They understand more fully why we need to balance pages through the newspaper, why we need busier pages opposite single issue pages.”

“The research will explain what combinations of stories on pages give us the best chance of increasing reader traffic”

Nick Carter

Editor

Leicester Mercury

editorial evaluation effectiveness prioritising content
Editorial evaluationEffectivenessPrioritising content

Interest/Rating analysis

Interest in subjects by each cluster group

International matters

Nostalgia

National matters

5.00

Holidays and travel

Matters about my town

Personal development

My neighbourhood

4.50

Personal fitness

Crime

4.00

Tennis

Corruption

3.50

Water sports

The environment

3.00

2.50

Athletics

Local politics

2.00

Participative sport

National politics

1.50

1.00

Other spectator sports

International politics

0.50

Football

Children's education

0.00

Recipes

University education

Restaurants

Economy

Fashion

News about companies

Arts

Investments

Personal health

Technology for business

High tech musicians

My hobbies and interests

Internet for business

Rich and concerned

Going to Music events

Internet for personal use

Fashion conscious

Going to the cinema and theatre

Technology for home

Television entertainment

Computer games

News guzzlers

Music at home

Modern Families

Apathetic

editorial evaluation effectiveness prioritising content86
Editorial evaluationEffectivenessPrioritising content

Interest/Rating analysis

Interest in subjects by each cluster group

International matters

National matters

5.00

Matters about my town

My neighbourhood

4.50

Crime

4.00

Corruption

3.50

The environment

3.00

2.50

Local politics

2.00

National politics

1.50

1.00

International politics

0.50

Children's education

0.00

University education

Economy

News about companies

Arts

Investments

Personal health

Technology for business

My hobbies and interests

Internet for business

Going to Music events

Internet for personal use

Going to the cinema and theatre

Technology for home

Television entertainment

Computer games

Music at home

Nostalgia

Holidays and travel

Personal development

Personal fitness

Tennis

Water sports

Athletics

Participative sport

Other spectator sports

Football

Recipes

Restaurants

Fashion

Interests

Ratings

editorial evaluation effectiveness competitive benchmarks
Editorial evaluationEffectivenessCompetitive benchmarks

Before

After

2

3

4

B readers trying A

A readers trying B

Competitive analysis

Rating scores before and after trial

Relevance

Relevance

12

Useful advertising

Useful advertising

Humour

Humour

10

Explanation of issues

Explanation of issues

Political opinion

Political opinion

8

Leisure & Lifestyle

Leisure & Lifestle

Business

Business

6

Film, Theatre,

Film, Theatre,

Entertainment

Entertainment

Other sport

Other sport

4

Football

Football

International Issues

2

International Issues

National issues

National issues

Worse

Better

0

0

1

5

6

editorial evaluation benchmarking efficiencies in finland
A breakdown of content by different content topics

Content areas that are growing or shrinking

Editorial costs per page

Editorial management as a proportion of headcount and budget

Editorial/advertising ratios

Average number pages produced per journalist.

Average cost per editorial employee

Number of articles per column metre

Number of pictures per column metre

Share of total editorial text produced by in-house editorial staff

Number of articles per week per journalist

Ratio of articles by staff as opposed to contributors

Mix of story counts and lengths

Average use of graphics and photographs

Contributor costs per article

Ratio of in-house to contributed materials, both in space and cost

Usage of remote reporters (critical in where local newspapers cover a large geography)

Editorial evaluationBenchmarking efficiencies in Finland

Editors receive the following:

17 Key

Performance

Indicators

editorial evaluation benchmarking efficiencies at turun sanomat
Editorial evaluationBenchmarking efficiencies at Turun Sanomat
  • Benchmarks the exact cost per page of production against peer-group,
  • Benchmarks editorial/advertising ratio against peers
    • 60/40 - ratio one of the highest in Finland
  • Tracks changes in content mix
    • Maintained leadership in sport
    • Increased coverage of culture

Turun Sanomat reduced their cost per page by 20%

editorial evaluation benchmarking efficiencies in finland91
Editorial evaluationBenchmarking efficiencies in Finland
  • "Differences of opinion usually occur due to lack of information. Here the editor and publisher have an objective measure of how efficient they are."
  • "Editors worried that their managing directors would run down the stats and ask for changes, but the process also allows the editor to make more valued judgements as to where to invest."

Olavi Rantalainen

Finnish Newspaper Association

editorial evaluation measuring newsroom efficiency
Editorial evaluationMeasuring newsroom efficiency
  • The most effective and efficient way of monitoring workflow efficiency is via the editorial system.
  • The system:
    • Creates a log of every news item and every change
    • Monitors the nature of that change (copy creation, correction, deletion, reformatting etc).
    • Stores the activity data either in the editorial system or another legacy database.
    • Produces reports, statistics and performance analysis.
  • Details the “path” followed by each news item.
  • Provides a detailed analysis by story, issue of the paper or individual
  • The editor can devise benchmarks for each part of the newspaper, and each person or department’s performance.
editorial evaluation measuring newsroom efficiency with unisys
Editorial evaluationMeasuring newsroom efficiency with Unisys
  • Il Messaggero reported a 50% increase in productivity;
  • Estado de S. Paulo halved page production times.
optimising the newspaper positioning the newspaper
Optimising the newspaper Positioning the newspaper

919

Your journalists think you are here.

Your readers think you are here.

739

828

937

They want you to be here

They want you to be here.

559

648

757

846

955

379

468

577

666

775

864

973

199

288

397

486

494

684

793

882

991

Event

Issue

Campaign

© eVolt.Co 1994

editorial evaluation measurement model
Editorial evaluationMeasurement model

Detailed step by step

measurement of the workflow

against four criteria

editorial evaluation in conclusion
Editorial evaluationIn conclusion
  • Accept that measurement and evaluation are practical, acceptable and beneficial;
  • Demonstrate benefits of systems to staff;
  • Set up a representative working party of editors and staff;
  • Set up good communication processes from the start.
  • Ensure procedures exist to overcome staff weaknesses
  • Set quantifiable early targets, for example:
    • ‘Reduce “return for error” by 25%.’
    • ‘Cut the number of steps in the workflow from 15 to 14’
    • ‘Adherence to deadlines’
    • Establish simple research mechanisms.
  • Use procedures to reduce work, not increase it.
  • Consider reward systems to focus minds.
putting the new newspaper to work issue 1 cash not conscience
Putting the new newspaper to workIssue 1. Cash not conscience
  • Who would believe it?
  • How will publishers get a return on investment in convergence?
    • Better, but more fragmented media products,
    • Produced more efficiently, more flexibly
    • With more complex markets in mind.”
  • Where is the market for a mega-multiple media product?
    • How will we sell it,
    • Will it ultimately deliver me a better return?
putting the new newspaper to work issue 2 one consumer one channel at a time
Putting the new newspaper to workIssue 2. One consumer. One channel at a time
  • Different channel solutions for different needs;
  • Consistency across these channels – brand and structure;
  • Two channels will revolutionise the newspaper medium:
    • Mobile:
      • Community,
        • Accessibility
          • Immediacy
    • Digital printing
      • Tailoring and specialisation
      • “Distribute print” models
    • We must be able to deliver our content, tailored to the priorities of consumers and communicators, from one point.
putting the new newspaper to work issue 3 specialisation by consumers and communicators
Putting the new newspaper to workIssue 3. Specialisation, by consumers and communicators
  • We all want less, better.
    • Content must be beneficial, relevant or engaging
    • Advertisers will pay more for less:
      • Most products’ target is a fraction of the whole
      • New media fragment mass and deliver niche.
    • We must tailor our content to consumers’ needs,
      • Leveraging advertising revenues per capita.
      • Requiring specific tools to deliver
    • Today’s media consumer wants static content and dynamic content:
      • Archive, data, graphics
      • Interaction, interrogation, aggregation.
putting the new newspaper to work issue 4 implementation how and who
Putting the new newspaper to workIssue 4. Implementation. How and who?
  • Do publishers take technology seriously?
    • High level input and knowledge?
    • Integrated market/product/technology strategy?
    • Technology ROI as market maker?

“Technologists need higher status and be more involved than has been the case to date….. We’re dealing with deep technology issues like network, storage, outsourcing, integration, supply change management, distribution change management, data-mining, process management across the internet. These are not issues that are specific to media companies, but are issues that media companies are bad at.”

putting the tailored newspaper to work technology implementation
Putting the tailored newspaper to work Technology implementation

Adoption

Profitability

2002

2007

  • Need for integrated solutions
    • Scalable
    • Scopable
    • Flexible
  • Need for investment now
    • Technology integration or
    • Integrated technology
the cynic s perspective
The cynic’s perspective
  • Why should media companies merge?
  • Why have major players not already rushed into multiple-media operations?
  • Cross-media ownership likely to be restrained by regulation;
  • Publishers will continue to operate around the edges of their current medium.
  • Can value be derived horizontally as well as vertically?
  • Is common branding a given
  • Could integration potentially drive yields downwards (Advertisers seeking cross-media discounts from single supplier?)?
  • Will the cost of convergence be greater than the return, within the next business cycle?
the tipping points media landscape 2007
The tipping pointsMedia landscape 2007
  • Newspaper readership
    • Circulation down 5%
    • Readership one year older
  • PC internet usage up 23%
  • SMS/MMS doubled in volume
  • Digital TV = terrestrial TV = mega fragmentation
  • Digital printing/tailored copy - production costs quartered.
  • XMO regulations relaxed (in many markets)
  • International industry consolidation – from 12% to 40%?
  • Newspaper share of ad revenues down from 33% to 29%
  • Recruitment revenues down by 18%
  • Motors/property revenues down 6%
  • Internet revenues up 30%
in conclusion areas of opportunity
In conclusionAreas of opportunity
  • Doing less better – in print, online.
  • Niche products for niche segments
  • Merging static and dynamic content
    • Archives
    • Alternative data sources
  • Adding value to the advertising package
    • Direct / events / extra-paper solutions
    • Improved effectiveness through CRM
  • Extending geography or niche
    • e.g. New York Times, Irish Times
  • Alternative distribution system
    • Newsstand, local print products