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Principles of AFP

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  1. Principles of AFP (Airspace Flow Program )

  2. Before you get started... • This training ppt. was created in order to assist all airlines in learning about AFP. • Feel free to add or delete slides as you need for your training. • Consult with ATA (Jeff Miller) before changing any slides that pertain to policy, procedure or guidelines. jmiller@airlines.org • Consider sending the “Pilot Bulletin” word document included in this training package to your flight department for distribution. • Both presentations, “AFP for Dispatchers” and “AFP for AOC Coordinators” have a link in the presentation to the “AFP Cost Effectiveness” module and the “Principles of AFP” video. • The Cost Effectiveness module is very large due to sound files and runs more efficiently through the link. • Principles of AFP video is also very large and runs better through the link. If you have the DVD you may choose to play it instead of running the digital file through the ppt. • Anyone interested in the “AACS (AFP AOC Coordination Spreadsheet, (see AFP Coordination) module, can contact Loraine Sandusky (COA) at: Loraine.Sandusky@coair.com and Sandy Clover (Metron Aviation) clover@metronaviation.com • For additional information on AFP go to this website: http://cdm.metronaviation.com/Workgroups/route_eval.html

  3. The AFP Initiative was developed collaboratively through the CDM/FET • FAA Members • Mark Libby, FAA Lead NOM - ATCSCC Glenn Godfrey NTMO -ATCSCC, Forrest Terral NTMO - ATCSCC, Dennis O'Hara STMC - ZDC, Charles McGrady STMC - ZID, Curt Kaler STMC - ZMP Jeff Tichenor STMC - D01 • Stakeholder Members • James Buckner, Industry POC - Honeywell Global Data, Ed Olsen - Northwest Airlines, Charlie Mead - American Airlines, Mark Hopkins - Delta Airlines, Gary Dockan - US Airways, Steve Scheurer - United Airlines, Jeff Miller - ATA, Jo Damato - NBAA, Marlin Palmer - NavCanada Other Mike Brennan - Metron Aviation, Phil Smith - OSU

  4. The Principles of AFP Training ppts. were developed by the following: Sandy Clover - Metron Aviation Bill Cranor - Continental Airlines Jo Damato - NBAA Gary Dockan - US Airways Mark Hopkins - Delta Airlines Tim Matuszewski United Airlines Charlie Mead - American Airlines Jeff Miller - ATA Ed Olsen - Northwest Airlines Steve Scheurer - United Airlines Loraine Sandusky - Continental Airlines

  5. Principles of AFP Video Click on button to start video

  6. Principles of AFP Principles of AFP Video AFP Acronyms The Problem Current Approach to SWAP AFP Concept AFP Cost and Effectiveness AFP Process Flow AFP Scenario AFP Basic Rules AFP Responsibilities AFP Coordination AFP Resources AFP Questions

  7. AFP Acronyms FSM - Flight Schedule Monitor FSS - Flight Service Station GA - General Aviation GDP - Ground Delay Program GS - Ground Stop HITL - Human in the Loop (Testing) LASDR - Low Altitude Arrival/Departure Route MIT - Miles-In-Trail NAS - National Airspace System NBAA - National Business Aircraft Association NESP - National Enroute Spacing Position OIS = Operational Information System RCTL - Re=Controlled SWAP - Severe Weather Avoidance Procedures TFM - Traffic Flow Management TMI - Traffic Management Initiative AFP – Airspace Flow Program AOC – Airline Operations Control Center ARTCC – Air Route Traffic Control Center ATCSCC – Air Traffic Control System Command Center CCFP – Collaborative Convective Forecast Product CCSD – Common Constraint Situation Display CDM – Collaborative Decision Making CDR – Coded Departure Route CTA – Controlled Time of Arrival DSP – Departure Spacing Program EDCT – Expected Departure Clearance Time ESM – Enhanced Substitution Module ESP – Enroute Sequencing Program ETMS – Enhanced Traffic Management System FCA – Flow Constrained Area FET – Flow Evaluation Team

  8. Problem • Our current tools do not effectively control volume through constrained airspace during SWAPevents. • Ground Delay Programs to Support SWAP events have not been very effective.

  9. SWAP What causes SWAP? Severe Weather Avoidance Procedures

  10. A Look at SWAP Intense weather that is close in or moving toward and will probably impact the N.Y. Metro area and/or weather in the Ohio Valley region initiates the SWAP process.

  11. A Look at SWAP CCFP (Collaborative Convective Forecast Product) forecasts the confidence, coverage and altitude of severe weather. When CCFP projects intensity levels of greater than 50% with High Confidence in the Ohio Valley and ZNY there is a good chance re-routes need to take place.

  12. A Look at SWAP CCFP (Collaborative Convective Forecast Product) forecasts the confidence, coverage and altitude of severe weather. When CCFP projects intensity levels of greater than 50% with High Confidence in the Ohio Valley and ZNY there is a good chance re-routes need to take place.

  13. A Look at SWAP Avoidance Procedures are implemented in the form of Miles-in-Trail, Enroute or Departure Spacing, Fix Balancing, Re-Routes, Flow Constraint Areas, Ground Stops, Ground Delay Programs and “GDP in Support of SWAP”

  14. A Look at SWAP Avoidance Procedures are implemented in the form of Miles-in-Trail, Enroute or Departure Spacing, Fix Balancing, Re-Routes, Flow Constraint Areas, Ground Stops, Ground Delay Programs and “GDP in Support of SWAP”

  15. Goals • Reduce enroute demand where capacity is limited due to an enroute weather constraint. • A more equitable distribution of delays to ALL users of this constrained airspace.

  16. Solution • Develop a tool that combines the use of current ... • FCA (Flow Constrained Area) and • GDP (Ground Delay Program) related technology to control traffic volume through constrained airspace.

  17. GDP’s Ground Delay Programs? How do they Work?

  18. Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) • Used to control excess arrival demand at airports. • Executed through FSM. • Assigns ‘arrival slots’ to flights based on airport capacity as indicated by the Airport Arrival Rate. • Releases each flight from its departure airport in time to meet its arrival slot. … delayed to match capacity Excess demand …

  19. FCA’s Flow Constrained Areas How do they Work?

  20. Flow Constrained Area (FCA) • Displayed on the CCSD (Common Constraint Situation Display). • FCA is a function within CCSD that identifies constrained airspace. • Normally Associated with RQD Advisories. FCAA01-FCAA06 will be used to monitor traffic. FCAA01-FCAA06 will only be RQD when associated with a CDM Airspace Flow Program Advisory. • Demand may be filtered by destination, airways, altitude etc. • Flight lists can be produced for flights flying through an FCA.

  21. Current Approach to SWAP

  22. On July 7th 2005, to deal with severe weather here … … specialists ran Ground Delay Programs at 14 airports Current Approach to SWAP Up until June, 2006 GDP’s were used to slow traffic during SWAP Events.

  23. Traffic managers commonly try to reduce enroute demand through constrained airspace by implementing GDPs in support of SWAP at airports to reduce flows of traffic to major airports.

  24. Traffic managers commonly try to reduce enroute demand through constrained airspace by implementing GDPs in support of SWAP at airports to reduce flows of traffic to major airports.

  25. Flights that are not routed through the constrained airspace end up taking delays because their destination is a “GDP in support of SWAP” Airport. Delayed by GDP in Support of SWAP

  26. Flights routed through constrained airspace end up not taking ground delays because their destination is not a GDP in support of SWAP Airport. NOT Delayed by GDP in Support of SWAP

  27. Flights routed through constrained airspace end up not taking ground delays because their destination is not a GDP in support of SWAP Airport. NOT Delayed by GDP in Support of SWAP

  28. Demand Profile in FCA before Airport GDPs Demand Profile in FCA after 10 Airport GDPs Effect of Airport GDPs on En Route Volume • Airport GDPs do not provide the control needed to manage airspace demand Total demand in the FCA is barely affected, even by 10 GDPs Spikes in the demand remain, which will lead to ground stops and other corrective actions The majority of flights in the FCA are not affected at all (green bars)

  29. AFP Concept

  30. AFP Concept • Allows traffic managers to apply coordinated delays to all flights requesting use of constrained enroute resources. • Uses established infrastructure and procedures for distributing Expect Departure Clearance Times (EDCTs). • Customers can avoid imposed ground delays by routing around constrained airspace. • Programs can be revised as demand and weather change, to fully utilize all available capacity.

  31. For the Summer of 2006, There are 6 FCA’s that could become AFP’s during a SWAP event in the Northeast.

  32. FCAA01-FCAA06 Flights out of the Northeast are NOT included in FCAA01-FCAA06 FCAA03 FCAA01 FCAA05 When an AFP is issued for one or more of these FCA’s, only flights bound for the Northeast will receive EDCT’s. FCAA02 FCAA04 FCAA06 NESP Rate Guidelines Flow through ZOB: Low Weather Impact: 90 – 100 Rate/Hour Med Weather Impact 80 – 90 Rate/Hour High Weather Impact 70 – 80 Rate/Hour

  33. FCAA01 Note the Filters FCAA01is defined by the western boundary of ZNY and extending to Lake Erie. Altitude Filters: 120 – 600 Arrival Filters: ZNY & ZBW Departure Filters: None Likely weather for use: Weather close in to or moving toward the N.Y. Metro area. Weather Triggers: Intense weather that is close in or moving toward the N.Y. Metro area and is or will likely directly impact the N.Y. Metro airports. FCAA01 NESP Rate Guidelines Flow through ZOB: Low Weather Impact: 90 – 100 Rate/Hour Med Weather Impact 80 – 90 Rate/Hour High Weather Impact 70 – 80 Rate/Hour

  34. FCAA02 FCAA02is defined by the northern boundary of ZDC from MRB extending southeastward. Altitude Filters: 120 – 600 Arrival Filters: ZNY & ZBW Departure Filters: None Likely weather for use: Weather close in to or moving toward the N.Y. Metro area. Weather Triggers: Intense weather that is close in or moving toward the N.Y. Metro area and is or will likely directly impact the N.Y. Metro airports. FCAA02 NESP Rate Guidelines Flow through ZDC: Low Weather Impact: 100 – 110 Rate/Hour Med Weather Impact 90 – 100 Rate/Hour High Weather Impact 80 – 90 Rate/Hour

  35. FCAA03 FCAA03is defined by the western boundary of ZOB and the eastern boundary of ZID. Altitude Filters: 120 – 600 Arrival Filters: ZNY & ZBW Departure Filters: None Likely weather for use: Weather in the Ohio Valley region would likely trigger use of this FCA. Weather Triggers: Lines and popcorn storms. CCFP predicted intensity levels of greater than 50% with High Confidence. FCAA03 NESP Rate Guidelines Flow through ZOB: Low Weather Impact: 70 – 75 Rate/Hour Med Weather Impact 60 – 70 Rate/Hour High Weather Impact 50 – 60 Rate/Hour

  36. FCAA04 FCAA04is defined by the entire western and southern boundary of ZDC. Altitude Filters: 120 – 600 Arrival Filters: ZNY & ZBW Departure Filters: None Likely weather for use: Weather in the Ohio Valley region or in ZDC airspace. Weather Triggers: Lines and popcorn storms. CCFP predicted intensity levels of greater than 50% with High Confidence. FCAA04 NESP Rate Guidelines Flow through ZDC: Low Weather Impact: 65 – 70 Rate/Hour Med Weather Impact 55 – 65 Rate/Hour High Weather Impact 50 – 55 Rate/Hour

  37. FCAA05 FCAA05is defined by the western boundary of ZOB and the eastern boundary of ZID. Altitude Filters: 120 – 600 Arrival Filters: ZNY, ZBW, ZDC Departure Filters: None Likely weather for use: Weather in the Ohio Valley region would likely trigger use of this FCA. Weather Triggers: Lines and popcorn storms. CCFP predicted intensity levels of greater than 50% with High Confidence. FCAA05 NESP Rate Guidelines Flow through ZOB: Low Weather Impact: 75 – 85 Rate/Hour Med Weather Impact 65 – 75 Rate/Hour High Weather Impact 55 – 65 Rate/Hour

  38. FCAA06 FCAA06is defined by the entire western and southern boundary of ZDC. Altitude Filters: 120 – 600 Arrival Filters: ZNY, ZBW, ZDC Departure Filters: None Likely weather for use: Weather in the Ohio Valley region or in ZDC airspace. Weather Triggers: Lines and popcorn storms. CCFP predicted intensity levels of greater than 50% with High Confidence. FCAA06 NESP Rate Guidelines Flow through ZDC: Low Weather Impact: 135 – 145 Rate/Hour Med Weather Impact 125 – 135 Rate/Hour High Weather Impact 115 – 125 Rate/Hour

  39. AFP Rate Guidelines These preliminary rate guidelines were developed based on historical demand. Rates are being validated through HitLs

  40. Before AFP During AFP AFP Benefits versus • Distributes delaysequitably among flights through the constrained resource. • Avoids imposingunnecessary delayson flights that don’t use the constrained airspace. • Provides customers with more predictability & flexibility /options (such as rerouting out of the AFP).

  41. AFP Cost and Effectiveness AFP Cost and Effectiveness Module Click this button to start

  42. AFP Process Flow

  43. Process Flow • The ATCSCC creates an FEA/FCA to support a possible AFP • Traffic Managers and others monitor the demand in the FEA/FCA and apply Traffic Management Initiatives (TMIs) • The Traffic Management team plans an AFP to deal with a pending problem • The ATCSCC executes an AFP • Customers respond to the AFP • Traffic Managers monitor demand in the NAS • Other TMI’s are applied to address congestion • The ATCSCC responds to changing conditions • The ATCSCC cancels the program

  44. AFPScenario

  45. Collaborative Convective Forecast Product High Confidence Medium Coverage

  46. Operations Plan is sent out indicating Possible AFP

  47. NESP at the ATCSCC (Command Center) evaluates effect of an AFP National Enroute Spacing Position monitors all scripted FCA’s, I.e., FCAA01, FCAA02, etc.

  48. AFP is Issued due to Demand exceeding Capacity ATCSCC ADVZY 004 FCAA05 03/17/2006 CDM AIRSPACE FLOW PROGRAM CTL ELEMENT: FCAA05 ELEMENT TYPE: FCA ADL TIME: 1455Z DELAY ASSIGNMENT MODE: DAS ENTRY ESTIMATED FOR: 17/1830Z - 18/0395Z PROGRAM RATE: 80/80/80/80/80/80/95/95/105/105 FLT INCL: ALL FLIGHTS IN FCAA05 DYNAMIC FLIGHT LIST DEP SCOPE: (MANUAL) ZSE ZAB ZLC ZFW ZLA ZAU ZMP ZDV ZKC ZME ZID ZMA ZHU ZJX ZOB ZBW ZTL ZNY ZDC ZOA ADDITIONAL DEP FACILITIES INCLUDED: CANADIAN DEP ARPTS INCLUDED: CYYZ CYEG CYYC CYVR MAXIMUM DELAY: 107 AVERAGE DELAY: 75.5 REASON: WEATHER REMARKS: OFFLOAD ROUTES AVAILABLE AS FOLLOWS: CAN1 EAST, PTIMES 1500Z AND LATER NOTE: THIS ROUTE WAS PRE-COORDINATED WITH THE NOC AT NAVCANADA VUZ PTIMES 1500Z AND LATER MGM 3 PTIMES 1700Z AND LATER NOTE: THESE REROUTES WERE PRE-COORDINATED WITH THE APPROPRIATE ARTCCS 171500-180459 Opportunities are given to avoid delay via Offload Routes.

  49. AFP is Issued due to Demand exceeding Capacity Opportunities are given to avoid delay via Offload Routes.

  50. AFP is Issued due to Demand exceeding Capacity Opportunities are given to avoid delay via Offload Routes.