Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) Integrated Response Course - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) Integrated Response Course PowerPoint Presentation
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Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) Integrated Response Course

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  1. Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) Integrated Response Course Department of Homeland Security 2006

  2. Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program • Initiated in 1988 • Joint FEMA - Army program • Implemented in 10 states & 41 counties • Current agents include GB (sarin), VX (nerve agent) & (HD) Mustard • Goal of “maximum public protection” as mandated by Congress

  3. Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program • Initiated in 1988 • Joint FEMA - Army program • Implemented in 10 states & 41 counties • Current agents include GB (sarin), VX (nerve agent) & (HD) Mustard • Goal of “maximum public protection” as mandated by Congress • Disposal completed at Aberdeen, MD

  4. CSEPP Training • Initiated in 1990 at CSEPP National Meeting • Comprehensive needs assessment • by job function • by location • Training Management Plan developed (1992, updated 1997 and 2005) • Training divided into 3 development paths • Technical, Public affairs, and Medical • Use variety of delivery techniques • http://emc.ornl.gov/CSEPPweb/FEMACSEPPHome.html

  5. Purpose of This Course • To present an integrated version of • Chem Awareness • ACT FAST (Agent Characteristics,Toxicology, First Aid, and Special Treatment ) • Personal Protective Equipment • Decontamination • Use of Auto Injector • CSEPP Multi-Hazard Medical Course

  6. Course Objectives • Understand the history of CSEPP and composition of the stockpile • Understand the potential hazards of nerve and mustard agents • Understand the signs and symptoms of nerve and mustard agent exposure • Understand the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) • Understand the process of decontaminating exposed personnel • Understand the medical treatment of nerve and mustard agent exposure

  7. Chemical Stockpile • Comprised of chemicals designed and produced for the sole purpose of warfare • Nerve agents and blister agents Deseret Chemical Disposal Facility

  8. CHEMICAL STOCKPILE LOCATIONS Umatilla Chemical Depot (UMCD) Hermiston, OR Newport Chemical Depot (NECD) Newport, IN WA Edgewood Chemical Activity (ECA) Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (Stockpile Destroyed) IL Deseret Chemical Depot (DCD) Tooele, UT Blue Grass ChemicalActivity (BGCA) Richmond, KY Pueblo Chemical Depot (PUCD) Pueblo, CO Pine Bluff Chemical Activity (PBCA) Pine Bluff, AR Anniston Chemical Activity (ANCA) Anniston, AL Storage Facilities States with Storage Facilities Impacted States

  9. Various Munitions Types Land Mine Cartridge Projectile 500 lb Bomb M-55 Rocket Bulk Containers

  10. TYPES OF AGENTS CA20

  11. Nerve Agents GA VX GB Blister Agents H HT L HD

  12. GA GB VX Nerve Agents • Attack body’s nervous system • Scientific classification: Organophosphate • organophosphates also include agricultural insecticides such as malathion and parathion CA22

  13. GB

  14. VX

  15. Specific Names Symbol Common name Referred to as VX VX VX GB Sarin GB or G-agent GA* Tabun GA or G-agent *Small amount is stored at Deseret Chemical Depot

  16. Nerve AgentPhysical Properties • Usually liquid in normal state • Becomes volatile and generates vapors if heated • Potential for release if in vapor or aerosol form • All nerve agents currently in liquid form • Most distinguishable factors are physical consistency and color

  17. VXPhysical Properties • Oily liquid; resembles light weight oil • Usually a pale amber color (colorless in pure form) • Odorless • Tasteless • Persistent; designed to cling to whatever it splatters on • persistence is weather-dependent

  18. G-AgentsPhysical Properties • GB is usually colorless, watery in pure form • GA may be pale to dark amber • GB has almost no odor • GB is tasteless • GB volatilizes at lower temperature than VX • GB evaporates more rapidly than VX but less than water

  19. H HD HT L Blister Agents (Vesicants) • Poisons that destroy individual cells • Blisters most noticeable effect from exposure • Includes sulfur mustard and Lewisite

  20. Specific Names Symbol Common name Referred to as H, HD, HT Sulfur mustard H, HD, HT L* Lewisite Lewisite *Small amount was stored at Deseret Chemical Depot and now destroyed

  21. HD

  22. L

  23. Sulfur MustardPhysical Properties • Mustard-garlic-like smell • Liquid or solid form in normal state • Melting point about 57oF • Becomes volatile and generates vapors if heated • burns well once ignited • Pale amber brown color in liquid form • Colorless gas when vaporized Laboratorybottle of sulfur mustard

  24. Lewisite Physical Properties • Amber to brown liquid • colorless when pure • About 10 times more volatile than sulfur mustard • Irritating, fruity or geranium-like odor • little odor when pure • Persistent • More dangerous as liquid than as vapor

  25. Non-Stockpile Agents • Cyanide (i.e., CK) • Pulmonary agents (i.e., Phosgene) • Riot Control agents (i.e., Mace) • Incapacitating agents (i.e., BZ)

  26. Non-Stockpile Agents • Riot Control Agents (i.e., Mace) • Incapacitating Agents (i.e., BZ)

  27. Example of CSEPP Planning Zones • Immediate Response Zone • Protective Action Zone • Precautionary Zone

  28. Likelihood of Agent Release • Most likely releases are small ones that do not pose a threat except to someone in very close proximity to the release site • Large releases with source terms large enough to pose a threat to community have much lower probability of occurring • Unlikely that a release will cause injury or death to anyone off-site

  29. Potential Types of Release and Associated Hazards • If a release is large enough to pose threat to public, the dominant hazard is from breathing air in which agent exists as vapor • Paths for liquid chemical warfare agent to travel from release point to off-site are limited and relatively easy to block; therefore people off-site unlikely to encounter liquid agent

  30. Four Basic Typesof Potential Releases • Spill • Fire • Explosion • Complex Simulated Chemical Explosion at Deseret, UT

  31. Spill • Onto ground or other surfaces • Resulting puddle of agent (liquid deposition) can evaporate into vapor and drift downwind Example of a plume resulting from a spill (not to scale)

  32. Explosion • Causes droplets of agent to be formed • Larger, heavier droplets quickly fall to ground (deposition) • Releases vapors and aerosols (smaller droplets and particles) that can travel greater distances Example of a plume resulting from an explosion (not to scale)

  33. Fire • Both aerosols and vapors are formed • Vapors and aerosols lifted higher into air because of heat from fire • Hazard similar to those of an explosion Example of a plume resulting from a fire (not to scale)

  34. Difference BetweenAerosols and Vapors • Think of a chemical agent release in terms of hair spray coming from a spray can • when spray is release, it is an aerosol • larger particles and/or droplets are deposited near point of release • particles quickly fall out of air onto hair and skin • person across room can smell hair spray from breathing vapors released

  35. What If a Release Occurs?(CSEPP) • It is very unlikely the public would be exposed to droplets and aerosols • Particles will mostly fall out of plume (via deposition) by time plume reaches installation boundary • Coordinated response system implemented

  36. Vapor Hazard • For most releases, the primary health hazard comes from vapors when they are inhaled or come in contact with skin or eyes • Agent vapors pose greatest hazard when inhaled because they are rapidly absorbed by lung tissues • Skin exposure to agent vapors can be hazardous, but seldom life-threatening

  37. Federal Response • NIMS - may require integration of Incident Command System (ICS) as off-post event would likely be of National Interest • DoD may send team to help communities with detection • FBI would likely respond to civilian terrorist event - change of custody of samples then would be needed

  38. Chemical Warfare Detection Capabilities (CSEPP) • Army’s detection capability consists of low-level and gross-level detectors • Any vapor detection efforts off-site would be conducted by Army survey teams using appropriate equipment • Civilian responders would monitor public for exposure in the hot zone using appropriate PPE