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Depth and Complexity Icons and Content Imperatives. Enriching Curriculum for Gifted Students. Agenda. Overview of the Needs of Gifted Students How Educators Use Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction to Serve Gifted Students Enriching the Depth of the Core Curriculum

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depth and complexity icons and content imperatives

Depth and Complexity Icons and Content Imperatives

Enriching Curriculum for Gifted Students

agenda
Agenda
  • Overview of the Needs of Gifted Students
  • How Educators Use Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction to Serve Gifted Students
  • Enriching the Depth of the Core Curriculum
  • Enriching the Complexity of the Core Curriculum
  • Developing Questions and Prompts for Gifted and Talented Students
objectives
Objectives
  • Participants will create a variety of questions and prompts to increase depth of curriculum and instruction for gifted and talented learners.
  • Participants will create a variety of questions and prompts to increase complexity of curriculum and instruction for gifted and talented learners.
  • Participants will collaborate with other instructors to improve upon their questions and prompts.
slide7

“The biggest mistake of past centuries in teaching has been to treat all children as if they were variants of the same individual and thus to feel justified in teaching them all the same subjects in the same way.”

---Howard Gardner

pre assessment
Pre Assessment

A measurement of what is

Known, Understood and

Able to be Applied

BEFORE

any instruction occurs.

This comes from a clear objective.

options for pre assessment before a new instructional unit
Options for Pre-assessment Before a New Instructional Unit
  • Pre-test students on unit concepts, skills, and facts.
  • Give the chapter test first.
  • Survey students about their experience & comfort level with the material.
  • Survey students on areas of interest in unit.
  • Complete a KWL chart (know/want to know/learned).
  • Use “find my partner” cards or match-up game.
  • Students create PSAs on what they know already.
  • Students write ironic statements on unit concepts.
formative assessment methods
Formative Assessment Methods
  • 3-2-1 Cards
  • Red/Yellow/Green “Traffic Lights” on Each Desk
  • Five Fingers in Front of Chest
  • Simultaneous Facial Expressions
  • White Board Challenges
  • Questions in the Box
  • Summary
  • Identifying Similarities and Differences
  • Defining Academic Vocabulary Terms
slide11

You have

this handout.

differentiation s core concepts dr sandra kaplan usc
Differentiation’s Core Concepts(Dr. Sandra Kaplan, USC)
  • Novelty: Activities to make the curriculum personally relevant
  • Depth: Extending the unit of study into an exploration of details, rules, patterns, trends, ethics, and ideas.
  • Complexity: Activities that require students to make connections between disciplines, perspectives, and eras.
  • Acceleration/Deceleration: Speeding up/slowing down rates of learning and increasing/decreasing difficulty of materials used for academic tasks.
slide13
Curriculum Differentiation: An Essential Element in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession
  • Content, activities, and products developed in response to various learner needs
  • Based on diagnosis of student readiness, interest, and learning profile
  • Focused on key concepts, understandings and skills found in the academic content standards
  • All students doing engaging and challenging work
  • Continual progression for each learner
  • Flexible use of time and space
  • Use of a variety of strategies and grouping methods
plan a meaningful differentiated lesson
Plan a

Meaningful

Differentiated Lesson

ensuring meaning
Depth:

Extending the study

Learning from the Concrete to the Abstract

Complexity:

Relationships between and among ideas

Connecting Concepts

Bridging Disciplines

Ensuring Meaning
depth extending one s study of course content
DEPTH: Extending One’s Study of Course Content
  • Challenge advanced learners by directing them to extend their understanding of the area of study.
  • Challenge struggling learners without overwhelming them
  • Provide students with tiered assignments, tiered lessons, and independent projects to make certain that advanced students are challenged and that struggling students catch up to grade level standards.
approaches to greater depth sandra kaplan usc
Approaches to Greater Depth(Sandra Kaplan, USC)
  • Language of the Discipline (experts’ nomenclature)
  • Details (parts, factors, attributes, variables)
  • Patterns (repetition, predictablility)
  • Trends (influence, forces, direction, course of action)
  • Unanswered Questions (discrepancies, missing parts)
  • Rules (structure, order, hierarchy, explanation)
  • Ethics (points of view, judgments, opinions)
  • Big Ideas (generalizations, principles, theories)
depth icons

Depth Icons

Move students toward greater expertise and strike a balance with the pervasive goal of coverage.

the icons may be used
The Icons May Be Used…
  • For differentiation of curriculum and instruction for gifted learners.
  • For framing whole class instruction, activities, and assessment, which will enrich the learning of gifted students…and everyone else.
icon based questions and prompts may be used
After reading assignments

In Socratic seminars

In lab write-ups

In math reviews

As summary activities

As comparison-contrast activities

In practice of a world language

In reflection on learning in physical education

On tests

As essay prompts

As formative assessment

Icon-Based Questions and Prompts May Be Used…
guidelines for creating student prompts and questions
Write in clear, concise, complete sentences.

Use the Costa’s Levels of Questions terms as your verbs.

Use the icons as your nouns.

Make sure that each prompt or question is rigorous.

Develop questions and prompts that get students to investigate the “power standards” of your grade or course.

Make certain that the icons are used explicitly within each question or prompt.

Guidelines for Creating Student Prompts and Questions
details
Details

Instructors encourage students to elaborate on an idea or event. The student’s ability to describe something is integral in the learning process.

patterns
Patterns

Students identify the recurring elements or repeated factors of an event or idea. It also focuses on the order of events.

trends
Trends

Students identify changes over time, noting factors or events (social, political, economic, geographic) that cause particular effects.

unanswered questions
Unanswered Questions
  • What ideas are unclear?
  • What information is unclear?
  • What don’t we know?
  • What areas have not been explained or proved yet?
  • Do any conclusions need further evidence or support?
ethics
Ethics
  • Students identify and analyze the possible rights and wrongs of a given idea or event, determining the elements that reflect bias, prejudice, and discrimination.
  • Students develop pro and con arguments in terms of ethics.
  • Students consider virtue, justice, rights, utilitarianism, and the common good.
big idea
Big Idea

Students draw conclusions in the form of generalizations, principles, and theories through the collection of facts and ideas and observations.

complexity making connections sandra kaplan usc
COMPLEXITY: Making Connections(Sandra Kaplan, USC)
  • Relationships Over Time (between past, present, and future; within a time period)
  • Points of View (multiple perspectives on the same event, opposing viewpoints, differing roles and knowledge)
  • Interdisciplinary Relationships (within the discipline, between disciplines, across the disciplines: aesthetics, economics, history, philosophy, psychology, mathematics, science)
complexity icons

Complexity Icons

Students are challenged to make connections across disciplines, over time, and between disciplines.

relate over time
Relate Over Time

Students identify and describe the effects that time has on the curriculum being studied.

multiple perspectives
Multiple Perspectives

Students look at ideas and events from different perspectives” historian, anthropologist, economist, archaeologist

across disciplines
Across Disciplines

Students describe a topic’s place in more than one discipline or subject area.

bloom s verbs
Bloom’s Verbs

Remembering: Can the student recall or remember the information?

define, duplicate, list, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce state

Understanding: Can the student explain ideas or concepts?

classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report,

select, translate, paraphrase

Applying: Can the student use the information in a new way?

choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate,

schedule, sketch, solve, use, write.

Analyzing: Can the student distinguish between the different parts?

appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate,

distinguish, examine, experiment, question, test.

Evaluating: Can the student justify a stand or decision?

appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluate.

Creating: Can the student create new product or point of view?

assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, write.

levels of thinking
Bloom’s Updated Taxonomy

Costa’s Three Story Intellect

Levels of Thinking

http://www.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/blooms_taxonomy.htm

http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Bloom's+and+the+Three+Storey+Intellect

slide38

The Three Story Intellect was inspired by Oliver Wendell Holmes.

You have this handout

Evaluate Generalize Idealize

Imagine Judge Predict Forecast Apply a Principle Speculate Hypothesize If/Then

Gathering Processing Applying

Compare Contrast Classify

Sort Distinguish Explain(Why)

Infer Sequence Analyze Reason

Synthesize Make Analogies

Complete Count Define Describe Identify Match Name Observe Recite Select List

costa s levels of questions

Costa’s Levels of Questions

A tool for supporting teachers and students in asking higher order questions.

costa s questions level 1
Costa’s Questions: Level 1
  • Define: What is the definition of lunar eclipse?
  • Identify: Identify the words in the [an] family.
  • Describe: Describe the setting of Rosie’s Walk
costa s questions level 1 continued
Costa’s Questions Level 1 (Continued)
  • List: List three ways we can express the equation 2+3=5.
  • Name: Name the main characters in Flat Stanley.
  • Observe: Make observations about the physical characteristics of this indigenous rock.
costa s questions level 2
Costa’s Questions: Level 2
  • Analyze: Analyze this daily menu. Is it well balanced? Why or why not?
  • Compare and contrast: Compare and contrast the life cycle of a bean plant and a butterfly.
  • Group: Group these living things into several groups based on how they obtain nutrients, how they move, and whether they are reptiles or amphibians.
costa s questions level 2 continued
Costa’s Questions: Level 2 (Continued)
  • Infer: If the moon was full on August 17, July 18, and June 19, when was it full in April?
  • Sequence: Sequence the names of the first ten presidents of the United States in the order they were elected.
  • Synthesize: Synthesize your previous learning to explain how term “manifest destiny” captures the essence of western expansion in the United States.
costa s questions level 3
Costa’s Questions: Level 3
  • Evaluate: Evaluate whether the soldiers in Stone Soup do a good job of convincing the town to help make the soup.
  • Apply a principle: Apply the principle of location, explaining how you know whether the location of a new settlement would support the settlers.
  • Hypothesize: Based on the evidence in the biography, hypothesize why the subject made the choice to ____(study medicine).
costa s questions level 3 continued
Costa’s Questions: Level 3 (Continued)
  • Imagine: Imagine how you would teach your children to cooperate.
  • Judge: Judge with criteria the problem resolution in Verdi.
  • Predict: Using the sunrise and sunset data from the last month, determine the time of sunrise and sunset tomorrow.
  • Speculate: Using details from Charlotte’s Web, speculate how Fern might, years later, describe Wilbur to her children.
rules
Rules

Students define the organizational elements affecting the specific curriculum being studied. Students identify and describe the factors--either human-made or natural--that affect the content at the focus of the study.

the icons may be used47
The Icons May Be Used…
  • For differentiation of curriculum and instruction for gifted learners.
  • For framing whole class instruction, activities, and assessment, which will enrich the learning of gifted students…and everyone else.
icon based questions and prompts may be used48
After reading assignments

In Socratic seminars

In lab write-ups

In math reviews

As summary activities

As comparison-contrast activities

In practice of a world language

In reflection on learning in physical education

On tests

As essay prompts

As formative assessment

Icon-Based Questions and Prompts May Be Used…
guidelines for creating student prompts and questions49
Write in clear, concise, complete sentences.

Use the Costa’s Levels of Questions terms as your verbs.

Use the icons as your nouns.

Make sure that each prompt or question is rigorous.

Develop questions and prompts that get students to investigate the “power standards” of your grade or course.

Make certain that the icons are used explicitly within each question or prompt.

Guidelines for Creating Student Prompts and Questions
4th ela standard 2 6 distinguish between fact and opinion cause and effect
4th ELA standard 2.6Distinguish between fact and opinion, cause and effect

Know the meaning of fact, opinion, cause, and effect. (Gather)

Understand the oppositional relationship between fact and opinion as well as cause and effect. (Process)

Be able to identify with evidence which of the fact/opinion and/or cause/effect is used in a text. (Apply)

slide51

You have

this handout.

questions and prompts

Questions and prompts

Not dichotomous

Use icon language and Costa’s or Bloom’s verbs

May or may not have a product attached

success
Success

Every child, in addition to challenge, needs success. And one of the problems with a classroom that is not differentiated is somebody is challenged and has a chance to succeed, but somebody is under challenged and succeeds without challenge, and someone else is over-challenged and does not have the opportunity for success.

Carol Ann Tomlinson