School-wide Positive Behaviour Support - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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School-wide Positive Behaviour Support

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  1. School-wide Positive Behaviour Support [name] [organization] Website: http://bcpbs.wordpress.com

  2. Goals of this Session Describe the reason for approaching student behaviour from a systems level Explain the essential elements of School-wide PBS Show some school outcomes

  3. The New Yorker

  4. The “Get Tough” approach:Assumption that “problem” student… Is inherently “bad” Will learn more appropriate behaviour through increased use of aversives Will be better tomorrow… …after the suspension

  5. Science and our experiences have taught us that students…. Are NOT born with “bad behaviours” Do NOT learn when presented with increasing levels of punishment …Do learn better ways of behaving by being taught directly & receiving positive feedback

  6. Social Responsibility & Academic Achievement Positive Behaviour Support OUTCOMES Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behaviour DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behaviour

  7. Social Responsibility & Academic Achievement Positive Behaviour Support Not specific practice or curriculum…it’s a general approach to preventing problem behaviour and encouraging prosocial behaviour OUTCOMES Not limited to any particular group of students…it’s for all students Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behaviour DATA SYSTEMS Not new…based on a long history of effective educational practices & strategies PRACTICES Supporting Student Behaviour

  8. Intensive Individual Interventions: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behaviour CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT Targeted Interventions: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behaviour Universal Interventions: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings

  9. What does PBS look like?

  10. Intensive Individual Interventions: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behaviour CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT ~5% ~15% Targeted Interventions: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behaviour Universal Interventions: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

  11. School-wide & Class-wide Systems Defineschool-wide expectations (i.e., social competencies) Teach and practice expectations Monitor and acknowledge prosocial behaviour Provide instructionalconsequences for problem behaviour Collect information and use it for decision-making

  12. Critical Features of EffectiveSchool-wide Expectations • Small number • 2 to 5 • Broad • Cover all expected behaviours • Memorable • Positively stated

  13. Bernard ElementaryChilliwack School DistrictPositive Behaviour Support Program

  14. LESSON PLAN LESSON PLAN LESSON PLAN

  15. On-going Acknowledgement of Appropriate Behaviour • Every faculty and staff member acknowledges appropriate behaviour • 5 to 1 ratio of positive to negative contacts • System that makes acknowledgement easy and simple for students and staff • Different strategies for acknowledging appropriate behaviour (small frequent incentives more effective)

  16. Are “rewards” dangerous? “Our research team has conducted a series of reviews and analysis of the literature; our conclusion is that there is no inherent negative property of reward. Our analyses indicate that the argument against the use of rewards is an overgeneralization based on a narrow set of circumstances.” • Cameron, 2002 See also: • Cameron & Pierce, 1994, 2002 • Cameron, Banko & Pierce, 2001

  17. Discourage Problem Behaviours • Do not ignore problem behaviour • Provide clear guidelines for what is handled in class vs. sent to the office • Use mild, instructional consequences • Remember the PURPOSES of negative consequences • Provide more practice • Prevent escalation of problem behaviours • Prevent/minimize reward for problem behaviours

  18. Intensive Individual Interventions: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behaviour CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT ~5% ~15% Targeted Interventions: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behaviour Universal Interventions: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

  19. TargetedInterventions • Efficient systems for students who need additional support beyond universal programs • Continuously available • Rapid access (within 72 hrs.) • Consistent with school-wide system • All school staff have access/knowledge • Should work for most (but not all) students

  20. Intensive Individual Interventions: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behaviour CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT ~5% ~15% Targeted Interventions: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behaviour Universal Interventions: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

  21. Intensive Individual Interventions • Individualized, function-based behaviour support • Identify what basic need students are trying to meet with problem behaviour • Teach adaptive, prosocial skills to meet those needs • Change environments to make problem behaviour less likely • Stopinadvertently making problem behaviour worse

  22. Does PBS make a difference in Canada? Kelm, J. L., McIntosh, K.,& Cooley, S. (under review). Effects of implementing school-wide positive behaviour support on social and academic outcomes. Good, C., McIntosh, K., & Gietz, C. (2011). Integrating bullying prevention into School-wide Positive Behaviour Support. Teaching Exceptional Children, 44(1), 48-56. McIntosh, K., Bennett, J. L., & Price, K. (2011). Evaluation of social and academic effects of school-wide positive behaviour support in a Canadian school district. Exceptionality Education International, 21, 46-60.

  23. BC Elementary School Example:Office Discipline Referrals

  24. What does a reduction of 266 discipline referrals mean?Kay Bingham Elementary • Savings in School Staff time (ODR = 15 min) • 3,990 minutes • 67 hours • 8 8-hour days • Savings in Student Instructional time (ODR = 30 min) • 7,980 minutes • 133 hours • 17 6-hour school days Get the cost-benefit calculator at: www.pbismaryland.org!

  25. BC Elementary School Example:Out of School Suspensions

  26. Student Satisfaction Survey: Grade 4

  27. FSA Results 2008-09: Grade 4

  28. How do we implement PBS?

  29. Needs of PBS • Staff Support • 3-4 year commitment • Proactive instructional approach • Resources • Administrative leadership • Time (FTE) • Monitoring • Data systems • Office discipline referral systems • Implementation surveys (e.g., pbisassessment.org)

  30. Where can I learn more about PBS?

  31. Resources • Websites: • bcpbs.wordpress.com • promisingpractices.research.educ.ubc.ca • pbis.org • Making Connections Conference • Richmond, BC Nov. 1 – 2, 2012

  32. Contact Information Website: http://bcpbs.wordpress.com • Name email address