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Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) production today and a Projection into the Future. Presentation to the FEAD International Conference Bruges, 18 October 2002. Paul Huggard (SITA) & Bernard Lanfranchi (Vivendi Environnement). Terminology. Several terms / concepts are currently used in EU:

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solid recovered fuel srf production today and a projection into the future

Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) production today and a Projection into the Future

Presentation to the FEAD International Conference

Bruges, 18 October 2002

Paul Huggard (SITA) &Bernard Lanfranchi (Vivendi Environnement)

terminology
Terminology
  • Several terms / concepts are currently used in EU:
    • SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel)
    • RDF (Refuse Derived Fuel)
  • Common feature: fuels produced from waste
  • Definition of SRF proposed by CEN standardisation committee (TC343):
    • Solid Recovered Fuel: « Fuel prepared from non hazardous waste to be utilised in waste incineration or co-incineration plants »
    • Fuel: « Energy carrier intended for energy conversion »
solid recovered fuels fit into a range of other waste derived fuels based on european law
Solid recovered fuels fit into a range of other waste-derived fuels, based on European law

High

A common denominator of these fuels is that they contribute to sustainable development...

Substitute fuel from hazwaste

WI directive

Level of environmental risk of the untreated waste

SRF

WI(2) directive

Landfill biogas

RES-E directive

…either through generation of electricity/heat or substitution for fossil fuel

Biomass

RES-E(1) directive

High

Low

Complexity of required pre-treatment

(1) Renewable Energy Sources - Electricity (2) Waste Incineration

sr f production currently represents a tiny part of the european waste market
SRF production currently represents a tiny part of the European waste market...

Rising to 14 Mt, 3.4% of volumes treated in Europe as a whole in 2005

Source: CEN Report, 2001

but production volumes are expected to grow rapidly in the next few years
…but production volumes are expected to grow rapidly in the next few years

Projected growth in SRF production volumes, selected EU countries, 2000 - 2005

2005 : 12.4 MT produced

Compound annual growth rate = 54%

2000 : 1.4 MT produced

Sources: CEN / FEAD estimates

srf can bring added value to the search for a secure energy source in europe
SRF can bring added value to the search for a secure energy source in Europe

Estimated recovered energy

from EfW plants

in 2005 in EU 15 countries:

3,7 MTOE / Year

  • Potential recovered energy
  • from SRF production plants
  • in 2005 in EU 15 countries:
  • 5,8 MTOE / Year
  • Same order of magnitude (lower tonnage compensated by higher calorific value)
  • Total EU15 production of primary energy: 790 MTOE/Year in 2001
  • Actual development of SRF production will be conditioned by
    • Legislative / regulatory factors
    • Technical / economic factors
legislative regulatory factors two possible trends
Legislative / Regulatory factors: two possible trends
  • At national level: towards possible assimilation of SRF to fuel when its characteristics are close to those of commercial fuels
      • Certain national situations already tend towards this interpretation (Scandinavia, Austria, Italy)
  • At European level: towards stricter interpretation of waste derived fuel status, along with the CEN mandate
      • Waste status applicable to all RDF, SRF
      • Consequence: RDF/SRF subject to WID
example of waste derived fuels users outlets
Example of Waste Derived Fuels users / outlets

Waste from which

Fuel is derived

(example)

Main SRF users

WID implemented

Prospective SRF users /

Standardisation

achieved

Wood residue (untreated)

District heating

District heating

District heating

Cement kilns

EfW plants

Power plants

Steelworks

Wood waste containing

no or very low levels

of HOC or heavy metals

(high Standard)

Cement kilns

EfW plants

Non hazardous waste from

Industry or Municipalities

(high Standard)

Cement Kilns

EfW plants

Power plants

Steelworks

technical economic factors which influence srf manufacture
Technical / economic factors which influence SRF manufacture
  • Local and acceptable waste arising
    • Commercial & Industrial Waste capable of providing SRF of high quality and calorific value
    • National level of development in sorting / selective collection
  • Price levels of competing treatment
    • Landfill gate fees (including landfill tax)
    • Incineration / co-incineration gate fees (competition or outlets)
  • Strict & consistent quality criteria to meet client needs
    • Level of pollutants
    • Physical / chemical properties, granulometry...
  • Long term outlets
    • EfW plants, cement kilns
    • Power plants, CHP, steelworks
  • Fossil fuel costs
    • Heavier taxation?
conclusion 1
Conclusion (1)
  • Potential quantity of energy from SRF production and usage is in the same order of magnitude as energy from mass-burn incineration
  • Pace of development of SRF market will be influenced by standardisation and legislative / regulatory status
    • SRF standardisation process within CEN will take several years to come to fruition
    • Product status for SRF seems unlikely in the short run
conclusion 2
Conclusion (2)
  • Waste Management Industry has an active role to play in providing its share of the EU energy needs, through complementary treatment options:
    • EfW contribution to energy security this contribution must be protected
    • SRF preparation and utilisation downstream outlets will have to be secured for SRF long term development