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The Paradigms They Are A- Changin ' > . The Future Of Research And Scholarship:. Open / Semantic / Social / Mobile. Gerry McKiernan Associate Professor Science and Technology Librarian Iowa State University Library Ames / Iowa / USA g errymck@iastate.edu .

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open semantic social mobile

The Paradigms They Are A-Changin' >

The Future Of Research And Scholarship:

Open / Semantic / Social / Mobile

Gerry McKiernan

Associate Professor

Science and Technology Librarian

Iowa State University Library

Ames / Iowa / USA

gerrymck@iastate.edu

http//www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/LimerickParadigms.ppt

symposium
Symposium

Social Networking Services At

Third-Level: Trends and Developments

Speakers

Gerry McKiernan, Associate Professor and Science and Technology Librarian

Iowa State University"The Paradigms They Are A-Changin':

The Future of Research and Scholarship >

Open / Semantic / Social / Mobile“

Dr. Stephen Kinsella, University of Limerick“Nihil Nemus: Social Media as the Bridge Between Research and Learning"

university of limerick
University of Limerick

Charles Parsons Lecture Theatre / June 9 2009 / 1430

Limerick / Luimneach

thank you
!!! Thank You !!!

Mícheál Ó hAodha

Librarian,

Science & Engineering

(CSIS, ECE, MAE, MOE)

Lewis L. Glucksman Library

University of Limerick

thank you7
!!! Thank You !!!

Brian Fitzgerald

Vice-President Research,

Frederick A Krehbiel II Chair in Innovation in Global Business & Technology

University of Limerick

thank you8
!!! Thank You !!!

Institute for the Study of Knowledge in Society

University of Limerick

thank you9
!!! Thank You !!!

Travel and Research Funds Committee

Iowa State University

Library

For Supplemental Funding

disclaimer 1
DISCLAIMER (1)

The screen prints selected for this presentation are for educational purposes, and their inclusion does not constitute an endorsement of an associated person, product, service, or institution.

disclaimer 2
DISCLAIMER (2)

The views and opinions

expressed in this presentation

are those of the presenter and do

not constitute an endorsement by Iowa State University

or its Library.

slide12

"The Medium Is The Message ...

The Audience Is The Content”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtycdRBAbXk

Marshall McLuhan. Understanding Media: The Extensions

of Man. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964.

open semantic social mobile13
Open / Semantic / Social / Mobile

OPEN >

SEMANTIC >>

SOCIAL >>>

MOBILE >>>>

research
RESEARCH
  • 1re·search || Pronunciation: \ri-ˈsərch, ˈrē-ˌ\
  • Function: noun
  • Etymology: Middle French recerche, from recercher to go about seeking, from Old French recerchier, from re- + cerchier, sercher to search — more at search Date: 1577
  • 1: careful or diligent search
  • 2: studious inquiry or examination ; especially : investigation or experimentation aimed at the discovery and interpretation of facts, revision of accepted theories or laws in the light of new facts, or practical application of such new or revised theories or laws
  • 3: the collecting of information about a particular subject

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/research

scholarship
SCHOLARSHIP
  • schol·ar·ship || Pronunciation: \-ˌship\
  • Function: noun Date: circa 1536
  • 1 : a grant-in-aid to a student (as by a college or foundation)
  • 2 : the character, qualities, activity, or attainments of a scholar : learning
  • 3 : a fund of knowledge and learning <drawing on the scholarship of the ancients>
  • synonyms see knowledge

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scholarship

slide18

Open / Semantic / Social/ Mobile

OPEN >

SEMANTIC >>

SOCIAL >>>

MOBILE >>>>

slide19

Open / Semantic / Social / Mobile

OPEN >

Open Access .

Open Data ..

Open Peer Review …

Open Research ….

slide20

OPEN ACCESS

In publishing, Open Access (OA) is free

online access to articles that have

traditionally been published in scholarly

journals.

Most open access material in this context

is distributed via the World Wide Web.

OA articles usually have limited

copyright and licensing restrictions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access_(publishing)

slide22

OPEN DATA (1)

Open Data is a philosophy and practice requiring that certain data are freely available to everyone, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control.

It has a similar ethos to a number of other "Open" movements and communities such as open source and open access. [snip]

The practice and ideology itself is well established … but the term "Open Data" itself is recent. Much of the emphasis in this entry is on data from scientific research and from the data-driven web.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_data

slide23

OPEN DATA (2)

Open Data is often focused on non-textual material such as maps, genomes, chemical compounds, mathematical and scientific formulae, medical data and practice, bioscience and biodiversity. Problems often arise because these are commercially valuable or can be aggregated into works of value.

Access to, or re-use of, the data are controlled by organisations, both public and private. Control may be through access restrictions, licenses, copyright, patents and charges for access or re-use.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_data

slide24

OPEN DATA (3)

Advocates of Open Data argue that these restrictions are against the communal good and that these data should be made available without restriction or fee.

In addition, it is important that the data are re-usable without requiring further permission, though the types of re-use (such as the creation of derivative works) may be controlled by license.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_data

slide25

OPEN DATA (4)

  • Arguments made on behalf of Open Data include:
  • "Data belong to the human race". Typical examples are genomes, data on organisms, medical science, environmental data.
  • Public money was used to fund the work and so it should be universally available.
  • It was created by or at a government institution (this is common in US National Laboratories and government agencies)
  • Facts cannot legally be copyrighted.
  • Sponsors of research do not get full value unless the resulting data are freely available
  • Restrictions on data re-use create an anticommons
  • Data are required for the smooth process of running communal human activities (map data, public institutions)
  • In scientific research, the rate of discovery is accelerated by better access to data.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_data

slide26

Open Data in Science

Peter Murray-Rust

Unilever Centre for Molecular Sciences Informatics

Department of Chemistry

University of Cambridge

Cambridge CB2 1EW, UK

Open Data (OD) is an emerging term in the process of defining how scientific data may be published and re-used without price or permission barriers. Scientists generally see published data as belonging to the scientific community, but many publishers claim copyright over data and will not allow its re-use without permission.

This is a major impediment to the progress of scholarship in the digital age. This article reviews the need for Open Data, shows examples of why Open Data are valuable and summarizes some early initiatives in formalizing the right of access to and re-use of scientific data.

http://precedings.nature.com/documents/1526/version/1

slide27

OPEN DATA (6)

Freedom to Research: Keeping Scientific Data Open,

Accessible, and Interoperable

ThinhNguyen.Counsel, Science Commons

According to Thomas S. Kuhn, scientific revolutions occur when a sufficient body of data accumulates to overthrow the dominant theories we use to frame reality—a so called paradigm shift. At a certain point, we can no longer ignore the fact that the old models don’t appear to be working or producing the results we want.

As an outgrowth of our work with the scientific community, we at Science Commons have had our own paradigm shift. The result is the Science Commons Protocol for Implementing Open Access Data, a set of principles designed to ensure that scientific data remains open, accessible, and interoperable. Creative Commons' announcement of the beta CC0 waiver is another milestone in this shift; the waiver is a new legal tool, along with the Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and License (PDDL), that implements the Protocol.

http://sciencecommons.org/wp-content/uploads/freedom-to-research.pdf

slide28

OPEN DATA (7)

OPEN DATA FOR GLOBAL SCIENCE

Paul F. Uhlir1* and Peter Schröder2

*1 National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20418, USA

2 Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS), Anna van Saksenlaan 51, 2593 HW Den Haag, The Netherlands

Abstract

The digital revolution has transformed the accumulation of properly curated public research data into an essential upstream resource whose value increases with use.

The potential contributions of such data to the creation of new knowledge and downstream economic and social goods can in many cases be multiplied exponentially when the data are made openly available on digital networks.

Most developed countries spend large amounts of public resources on research and related scientific facilities and instruments that generate massive amounts of data.

http://www.spatial.maine.edu/icfs/Uhlir-SchroederPaper.pdf

slide29

OPEN DATA (11)

OPEN DATA IN SCIENCE – TECHNICAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS

Peter Murray-Rust (Department of Chemistry, Cambridge University

Research in STM fields routinely generates and requires large

amounts of data in electronic form. The growth of scientific

research using infrastructures such as the Grid, UK's eScience

programme and cyber infrastructure requires the re-use,

repurposing and redissemination of this information.

Fields like bioinformatics, astronomy, physics, and earth /

Environmental sciences routinely use such data as primary

research input.

Much of this is now carried out by machines which harvest data

From multiple sources in dynamic and iterative ways, validate,

filter compute and republish it. The current publication process

And legal infrastructure is now a serious hindrance to this.

http://tinyurl.com/98pn5

slide30

SPARC-OPENDATA

The SPARC Open Data Email Discussion List will provide a

forum for participants to explore issues of access to digital data

associated with peer-reviewed STM research.

Many advocates of Open Data believe that, although there

are substantial potential benefits from sharing and reusing

digital data upon which scientific advances are built, today

much of it is being lost or underutilized because of legal,

technological and other barriers.

[snip]

The list’s emphasis is on defining the scope of Open Data and

collecting examples of desirable and undesirable practices.

To subscribe, send a message to:

SPARC-OpenData-on@arl.org.

http://www.arl.org/sparc/opendata/

slide31

OPEN DATA (14)

National Research Council (Canada)

Gateway to Scientific Data

Open Data Commons

European Open Data Inventory

data.gov

slide35

Open / Semantic / Social / Mobile

SEMANTIC >

Audio .

Interactivity ..

Supplemental Content …

Video ….

slide36

SEMANTIC (1)

  • Semantic Publishing can be defined as “anything that enhances the meaning of a published journal article, facilitates its automated discovery, enables its linking to semantically related articles, provides access to data within the article in actionable form, or facilitates integration of data between papers.
  • Among other things, it involves enriching the article with appropriate metadata that are amenable to automated processing and analysis, allowing enhanced verifiability of published information and providing the capacity for automated discovery and summarization.

http://tinyurl.com/c9zybh

slide37

SEMANTIC (2)

  • These semantic enhancements increase the intrinsic value of journal articles, by increasing the ease by which information, understanding and knowledge can be extracted.
  • They also enable the development of secondary services that can integrate information between such enhanced articles, providing additional business opportunities for the publishers involved.
  • Equally importantly, readers benefit from more rapid, more convenient and more complete access to reliable information.”

http://tinyurl.com/c9zybh

slide38

ECLECTIC

E Is for Everything:

The Extra-Ordinary, Evolutionary [E-]Journal

  • An ever-increasing number of e-journals are transcending the limitations of the paper medium by incorporating and integrating a wide variety of innovative electronic features and content.
  • In this article, we examine the current evolution of the scholarly journal and review the emergence of functionalities that expand and extend the conventional electronic journal.
  • We further explore additional e-journal enhancements and consider new forms and formats of scholarly communication likely to arise in the not-so-distant future.

http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/Eis4.pdf

slide39

AUDIO

PLoS Computational Biology

beta.nejm.com

slide43

INTERACTIVITY

Impact of Environment and Social Gradient on Leptospira Infection in Urban Slums

slide48

Open / Semantic / Social/ Mobile

SOCIAL >

Science Blogging .

Social Bookmarking ..

Social Networking …

Social Software ….

slide49

SOCIAL NETWORKING (1)

A social network service focuses on building online communities of people who share interests and/or activities, or who are interested in exploring the interests and activities of others.

Most social network services are primarily Web-based and provide a collection of various ways for users to interact, such as chat, messaging, email, video, voice chat, file sharing, blogging, discussion groups, … [etc.].

A social network service focuses on building online communities of people who share interests and/or activities, or who are interested in exploring the interests and activities of others.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_network_service

slide50

Swiss Army Information Tools

http://tinyurl.com/3gjdzw

slide51

Irish Army Information O’Toole

http://tinyurl.com/3gjdzw

slide52

SOCIAL NETWORKING (2)

The main types of social networking services are those which contain category divisions (such as former school-year or classmates), means to connect with friends (usually with self-description pages) and a recommendation system linked to trust.

Popular methods now combine many of these, with Facebook widely used worldwide; MySpace, Twitter and LinkedIn being the most widely used in North America;Nexopia (mostly in Canada); Bebo,Hi5, MySpace, dol2day (mostly in Germany), Tagged, XING;[ and Skyrock in parts of Europe;Orkut and Hi5 in South America and Central America; and Friendster, Multiply, Orkut, Wretch, Xiaonei and Cyworld in Asia and the Pacific Islands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_networking

slide53

January2008

http://tinyurl.com/2ov6gc

slide54

SOCIAL NETWORKING (3)

Social Science Research Network

Lalisio

SciSpace.net

slide55

SCISPACE.NET (1)

Scispace.net is a non-commercial, non-profit and free-to-use

social network service designed specifically for collaborating

researchers. In several respects it builds on many of the tools

found in standard social network service and elearning

sites, such as the use of wikis, blogs, comments, tags, comment

walls, and profiles.

However, unlike many of these sites, privacy and fine

grained access control is of paramount importance. For

example, a small group of researchers using these tools. To

develop a set of ideas that will ultimately lead to a publication

or funding proposal need to be certain that their ideas, and the

existence of these ideas, will not be seen by others.

http://www.scispace.net/

slide56

SCISPACE.NET (2)

Until the advent of social network service and related Web

2.0 technologies, the primary tool for collaborators has been

email, which the owners/authors feel serves this purpose only

poorly.

Scispace.net has been developed by scientists working

within an academic environment, but the owners/authors

believe that this approach should be able to meet the

needs of collaborators working in different disciplines

and different environments.

In many ways scispace.net is an active experiment in

how these tools can be used to support collaborative

research, in what is actually a fast changing environment.

http://www.scispace.net/

slide63

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH NETWORK (1)

The Social Science Research Network (SSRN) is a website

devoted to the rapid dissemination of scholarly research in the

social sciences and humanities. SSRN is viewed as particularly

strong in the fields of economics, finance, accounting,

management, and law.

SSRN Networks

Accounting / Classics / Cognitive Science / Corporate

Governance / Economics / English & American Literature /

Entrepreneurship Research & Policy / Financial Economics

Health Economics / Information Systems & eBusiness /

Leadership / Legal Scholarship / Management / Marketing /

Negotiations / Philosophy / Political Science / Social Insurance

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Science_Research_Network

slide64

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH NETWORK (2)

Since its foundation in 1994, SSRN has grown in importance

in the academic community. In economics, and to some degree

in Law … almost all papers are now first published as preprints

on SSRN and/or on other paper distribution networks such as

RePEc before being submitted to an academic journal.

Academic papers can be uploaded directly to the site by authors

as PDF documents. All author-uploaded papers are available for

worldwide free downloading.

Users can also subscribe to abstracting e-mail journals covering

a broad range of subject matters. These eJournals then periodically

distribute emails containing abstracts (with links to the full text

where applicable) of papers recently submitted to SSRN in the

respective field.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Science_Research_Network

slide65

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH NETWORK (3)

On SSRN, authors and papers are ranked by their number of

downloads, which has become an informal indicator of

popularity on prepress and open access sites.

SSRN, like other preprint services, circulates publications

throughout the scholarly community at an early stage,

permitting the author to incorporate comments into the final

version of the paper before its publication in a journal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Science_Research_Network

slide66

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH NETWORK (4)

The SSRN eLibrary consists of two parts: an Abstract Database

containing abstracts on over 233,600 scholarly working papers and

forthcoming papers and an Electronic Paper Collection currently

containing over 191,600 downloadable full text documents in Adobe

Acrobat pdfformat.TheeLibrary also includes the research papers

of a number of Fee Based Partner Publications.

The Networks encourage readers to communicate directly with

authors and other subscribers concerning their own and others‘

research. To facilitate this we publish detailed author contact

information including email addresses for authors of each paper. We

also provide electronic delivery of the papers when authors wish us

to do sofrom the SSRN eLibrary.

http://ssrn.com/

slide76

Open / Semantic / Social / Mobile

MOBILE >

Mobile Access .

Mobile Content . .

Mobile Data …

Mobile Research ….

slide77

MOBILE ACCESS

Mobile Access can be defined as access to digital information resources via any mobile device

slide78

MOBILE ACCESS

arXiview: arXiv For The iPhone

BioMed Central

WorldCat Mobile (Beta)

Kindle For The iPhone

Medline/PubMed On Tap

slide81

KINDLE FOR THE iPHONE (1)

Amazon Kindle is a software and hardware platform for reading

electronic books (e-books), developed by Amazon.com subsidiary

Lab126, first launched in the United States on November 19, 2007.

Two hardware devices, known as "Kindle" and "Kindle 2,“

Support this platform, as does an iPhone application called

"Kindle for iPhone.“

Kindle for iPhone is a free application that lets you read more

than 240,000 Kindle books on your iPhone or iPod touch—no

Kindle required. Amazon's new Whispersync functionality

automatically synchronizes your last page read so you can easily

switch between devices and pick up reading from where you last

left off.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Kindle

http://tinyurl.com/ljv4ub

slide82

KINDLE FOR THE iPHONE (2)

You Tube Video

Amazon Kindle software on the iPhone and Kindle 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9aeH99g-vM

slide84

WORLDCAT MOBILE (1)

WorldCat Mobile (Beta)

Search for library materials—Enter search terms such as

keywords, author or title / Find a WorldCat library near you—

Enter your ZIP, postal code or location in the Libraries Locator /

Call a Library / Highlight and click the phone number in a library

Listing to place a call / Map a route—Find the fastest way to a

WorldCat library using the mapping software already on your

device.

Now you can use your mobile phone to find materials in libraries

near you—and help us test this new pilot service. Available to

people in the United States and Canada, the six-month pilot lets

you try out mobile search of WorldCat libraries and suggest

improvements or additional features.

http://worldcat.boopsie.com/home/worldcat/

slide85

WORLDCAT MOBILE (2)

WorldCat has partnered with mobile-technology leader

Boopsie and joined its growing array of search "channels" that

let you quickly access popular Web applications including

Google, Wikipedia and Facebook; look up retail locations such

as Starbucks and FedEx; and check news, weather, traffic

reports and much more!

When you download the Boopsie application to your phone,

you get library search plus these additional channels, as well as

its "smart prefix" feature that allows you to type only the first

few letters of search keywords and view results instantly as

you type.

http://worldcat.boopsie.com/home/worldcat/

slide86

WORLDCAT MOBILE (3)

Get Started

Using the Web browser on your mobile phone, navigate to

[http://www.worldcat.org/m/] to access the WorldCat mobile

application. The application is compatible with these phones and

mobile operating systems: Windows Mobile 5.0 / Blackberry / Palm

OS 5.4 or later / Apple iPhone / Nokia / MIDP 2.0, CLDC 1.1 Java /

A Complete List Of Supported Phones Is Available

[http://worldcat.boopsie.com/home/phones.html]

News Release

[http://www.oclc.org/news/releases/20095.htm]

Video Demo

[http://www.boopsie.com/home/worldcat.wmv]

Mobile Applications For Libraries

And The WorldCat Mobile Pilot (42:36)

[http://tinyurl.com/d4ghav]

http://worldcat.boopsie.com/home/worldcat/

slide89

MOBILE CONTENT

ACSpressrom

AIP Publishing

Nature Protocols

the future is already here it s just not evenly distributed

The Future Is Already Here …It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed

Attributed To William Gibson,

Cyberpunk Science Fiction Author

Coined Term: “Cyberspace”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Gibson

slide98

The Best Way To Predict The Future Is To Invent It

Alan Kay

Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) Meeting 1971

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Kay

alan kay
Alan Kay

American computer scientist, known for his early pioneering work on object-oriented programming and windowing graphical user interface design

Conceived the Dynabook concept which defined the basics of the laptop computer and the tablet computer

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Kay