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MINE RESCUE ACTIVITY BOOK – Section I. MSHA 2208 NOVEMBER 1981 JUNE 2005. Northern Mine Rescue Association. About The Training Modules.

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mine rescue activity book section i
MINE RESCUE ACTIVITY BOOK – Section I
  • MSHA 2208
  • NOVEMBER 1981
  • JUNE 2005
about the training modules
About The Training Modules
  • The modules are designed to implement the training of the Nation’s Mine Rescue Team Members as mandated by 30 CFR Part 49 Chapter I Subchapter H pursuant to the Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977.
  • Each Module covers a separate subject in a self-contained unit with suggested handouts and visual material to aid in its presentation.
about the training modules4
About The Training Modules
  • They are designed specifically for the training of underground inexperienced or experienced Mine Rescue Team Members.
  • This program was developed by the Mining Extension Service of West Virginia for MSHA under the U.S. Bureau of Mines Contract #JO308002
introduction
Introduction
  • The Activity Book contains training activities that are suggested for use in conjunction with the Advanced/Refresher Mine Rescue Training Modules.
  • Some of the activities can be integrated into the training lecture where indicated in the modules. Others are full training sessions in themselves and can be used to supplement the module lectures.
introduction6
Introduction
  • The purpose of these activities is to help trainers build competent mine rescue teams.
  • Some of the activities focus on an individual team members ability to perform basic skills, such as operating a piece of firefighting equipment.
  • Other activities focus on the team as a unit – the teams ability to work together successfully under the direction of the captain and to respond appropriately to realistic mine rescue situations and assignments.
introduction7
Introduction
  • Each activity is broken down into its component parts:
    • Purpose of activity
    • Type of activity (e.g. underground work problem or classroom discussion)
    • Materials needed
    • Arrangements to make advance
    • Description of activity (e.g. directions to team, what to emphasize)
    • Evaluation of Activity
introduction8
Introduction
  • Also, the activities will be labeled according to complexity:
    • Level 1 activities are the simpler, more basic ones
    • Level 2 activities are more complex
  • A trainer working with a beginning team will find both Level 1 and Level 2 activities useful.
  • With a more experience team, a trainer might decide to skip some of level 1 activities.
introduction9
Introduction
  • The training areas covered in each activity are listed on a chart following this introduction to further aid you in choosing appropriate activities for your team.
role of the team trainer
Role of the Team Trainer
  • The role of the team trainer in successful training cannot be overemphasized. It is up to you to choose the activities that are appropriate for your team to plan and structure those activities to obtain the maximum benefit from them
role of the team trainer12
Role of the Team Trainer
  • For instance, you may decide to alter some of the situations or problems to make them specific to your teams mine or a sister mine the team may be called to.
  • Also, you can develop new activities patterned on the ones provided here.
  • You will find that by altering the problems and briefings in a number of the Level 2 activities, you can use these profitably year after year in your training program.
choosing and planning an activity
Choosing and Planning an Activity
  • In choosing and planning an activity, there are a number of factors that you should consider:
    • Check the stated purpose of the activity, does the team need practice in this area?
    • Is the activity appropriate to the skill level of the team?
    • Should you alter or tailor the activity in any way to make it more useful?
    • Do you have or can you get the equipment needed for the activity?
    • Do you need to make any arrangements for using surface or underground facilities?
    • Will people other than the team members be needed to set up and carry out the activity (e.g., Benchman)?
choosing and planning an activity14
Choosing and Planning an Activity
  • In choosing and planning an activity, there are a number of factors that you should consider:
    • How much time will be needed to prepare for, complete, and clean up from the activity? When estimating time, be sure to include the following:
      • Time to prepare and test the apparatus (if used)
      • Time to travel to the area where the activity will be held.
      • Time to prepare area for activity (if necessary)
      • Time to complete activity.
choosing and planning an activity15
Choosing and Planning an Activity
  • In choosing and planning an activity, there are a number of factors that you should consider:
    • How much time will be needed to prepare for, complete, and clean up from the activity? When estimating time, be sure to include the following:
      • Time to restore area to original condition after the activity (if necessary).
      • Time to clean, recharge, and store apparatus (if used).
      • Time to critique teams performance.
      • Time for questions, answers, and discussion.
evaluating team performance
Evaluating Team Performance
  • The evaluation is an extremely important part of the learning process. The time spent is not only necessary but vital to the teams development and improvement.
three steps for effective evaluation of the team s performance
Three Steps for Effective Evaluation of the Team’s Performance
  • Observe and record performance
    • During the performance of each activity the team trainer or someone working with the trainer should evaluate the team or the individual team members, whichever is appropriate to the activity. With each activity in the book, you will find an evaluation section which contains suggestions to help you in evaluating the teams or team members performance. Sometimes a checklist is included, containing suggested questions to consider in the evaluation.
three steps for effective evaluation of the team s
Three Steps for Effective Evaluation of the Team’s
  • Review the observation results with the team.
    • This review session should be held as soon as possible after the team has completed the activity. You should go over both the positive and negative aspects of the teams performance. In addition, time should be allowed for team members to ask any questions they might have about the activity or about the trainers evaluation of them.
three steps for effective evaluation of the team s19
Three Steps for Effective Evaluation of the Team’s
  • Recommend Future Training
    • Once the review session is completed, you should begin thinking about the future training needs of the team. Based on what you have observed during the activity, you should be able to recommend areas in which the team needs more knowledge or experience. This might mean reviewing certain information from a module (e.g., team needs more knowledge of SO2 gas), or it might mean altering a future activity to give the team more experience in a specific area (e.g., communications).
activity 1 using gas detectors22
Activity 1 – Using Gas Detectors
  • Level 1
  • Purpose: Team members will develop skill in taking gas readings with portable gas detectors.
  • Type: Classroom or outdoor work problem
activity 1 using gas detectors23
Activity 1 – Using Gas Detectors
  • Materials
    • Gas detectors and extra tubes
    • Gas testing boxes (if available) and cylinders of gases you will be using in the test boxes
activity 1 using gas detectors24
Activity 1 – Using Gas Detectors
  • Arrangements:
    • If possible, set up test boxes with gases to be tested.
    • If you don’t use test boxes, have the team members go through the motions of making tests in normal air.
activity 1 using gas detectors25
Activity 1 – Using Gas Detectors
  • Description:
    • Have team members perform tests for the gases that may be present in the mines they serve and for oxygen deficient atmospheres. If possible, have each team member practice operating the testing device. Follow manufacturers instructions for the proper use of each device.
      • Emphasize the following during the activity:
      • Proper separation of detector (zero adjustment, battery check, correct tube, etc.)
      • Proper procedure in taking the reading (proper height, according to specific gravity, and proper use of instrument)
      • Accurate reporting of the findings
activity 1 using gas detectors26
Activity 1 – Using Gas Detectors
  • Evaluation
    • Use the following checklist to aid you in evaluating each team members performance. Be sure to list and discuss any problems the team encountered.
    • You may wish to make copies of the checklist for each of the gas detectors you use.
activity 2 assessing gas conditions
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Level 1
  • Purpose: The team will practice identifying the gases that may be present in certain mine rescue situations, and interpreting the hazards that these gases present.
  • Type: Classroom discussion
activity 2 assessing gas conditions29
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Materials: Gas chart visuals from Mine Gases Module (MSHA 2202), optional.
  • Arrangements: (Optional) Pass out copies of the gas charts to team (from Mine Gases Module – MSHA 2202).
activity 2 assessing gas conditions30
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Description:
    • Describe possible mine rescue situation to the team. You can either make up your own situations or use the sample situations provided below. You might wish to adapt some of the sample situations to be more specific to the teams mine.
    • Have the team members discuss the situations and determine:
      • What gases are likely to be present as a result of the known conditions, and
      • What dangers these gases present.
activity 2 assessing gas conditions31
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 1
  • An area of the mine has been sealed for several months to extinguish a fire. You go to unseal the area. What gas conditions might you expect to encounter when reentering the area, and what hazards would these gases present?
activity 2 assessing gas conditions32
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 1 - Answers
  • Gas Conditions:
    • O2 deficiency
    • Elevated CO2 and N2
    • Elevated CH4 (if CH4 is possible in the mine)
    • In some mines, H2S and SO2 are possible)
activity 2 assessing gas conditions33
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 1 - Answers
  • Hazards:
    • Irrespirable atmosphere
    • Opening seals could introduce O2 and cause a re-ignition of the fire or an explosion
    • Although not previously detected, SO2 and H2S could be liberated by pumping or walking through water. Both are toxic.
activity 2 assessing gas conditions34
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 2
  • A large fire has been burning at a battery charging station for about 10 minutes. What gas conditions might you expect to encounter during firefighting, and what hazards do these gases present?
activity 2 assessing gas conditions35
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 2 - Answers
  • Gas Conditions:
    • O2 deficiency
    • Elevated CO and CO2
    • Smoke
    • Gases from battery charging station (NO2 , H2)
activity 2 assessing gas conditions36
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 2 - Answers
  • Hazards:
    • Irrespirable atmosphere (because of oxygen deficiency, presence of CO and NO2)
    • Possibility of an explosion (because of elevated CO and H2)
    • Poor visibility (because of smoke)
activity 2 assessing gas conditions37
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 3
  • You are told to explore an inactive level. What gas conditions might you expect to encounter, and what hazards would these gases present?
activity 2 assessing gas conditions38
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 3 - Answers
  • Gas Conditions:
    • O2 deficiency
    • Elevated CO, CH4, CO2, NO2, H2, and heavy hydrocarbons (ethane, butane, and propane)
activity 2 assessing gas conditions39
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Sample Situation 3 - Answers
  • Hazards:
    • Irrespirable atmosphere
    • Possible further explosions
activity 2 assessing gas conditions40
Activity 2 – Assessing Gas Conditions
  • Evaluation
    • Use the following checklist to aid you in evaluating each team members performance. Be sure to list and discuss any problems the team encountered.
    • You may wish to make copies of the checklist for each of the gas detectors you use.