making adaptations
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Making Adaptations

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 21

Making Adaptations - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 220 Views
  • Uploaded on

Making Adaptations. Physical modifications f or children who have disabilities Terri Andrews . CAN do attitude. Teachers tend to focus on what children who have a disability can’t do. The focus of an effective teacher should be what they CAN do!.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Making Adaptations' - Albert_Lan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
making adaptations

Making Adaptations

Physicalmodifications

for children who have disabilities

Terri Andrews

can do attitude
CAN do attitude

Teachers tend to focus on what children who have a disability can’t do.

The focus of an effective teacher should be what they CAN do!

general philosophies as set by experts in the field of adapted physical education
General Philosophies- as set by experts in the field of Adapted Physical Education

1. You are responsible for the physical and emotional safety of the child

2. Be familiar with the legal, medical, and physical concerns of the child

3. Do not make modifications that make all of the other children suffer. This will only lead to resentment toward the student

  • Choose an activity modification that is as close to the original activity as possible, being sure that it is challenging but achievable.
  • Design activities that are age appropriate
  • Accept that there are some times when a parallel activity will be necessary, but it should be a last resort.
  • Excluding a doctor’s note, there is no time that it acceptable to have a child be a scorekeeper or cheerleader while sitting out.
  • Consider the interests and abilities of the child, but do require some modified activity goals to be met.
cheap or free equipment
Cheap or free equipment

Velcro- mobility or vision impairments, Downs Syndrome

This will assist students who do not have the fine motor skills, hand/eye coordination skills, or strength to pick up equipment

  • Use this to attach to the piece of equipment that they are using and attach other piece to a glove that they can wear

*Example: wear the glove and pick up a ball with velcro strips

  • Attach the velcro to the bottom of a lightweight stick , pole, or noodle
  • Example: put it on the end of a foam noodle and use it to pick up bean bags,
  • Use this to move simple task schedule pictures

for children with Autism at stations

cheap or free equipment6
Cheap or free equipment

Cut jump ropes- mobility or vision

impairments . This is suggested

for students who are not able to

jump or have very limited jumping

ability

Example: Use this to allow students to jump at their ability or remain stationary while they create tricks or patterns with the disconnected ends of the ropes.

cheap and free equipment
Cheap and free equipment
  • Elastic string- mobility, or vision impairment

Use this to tie to birdies, whiffle balls, and anything that you can attach it to so that students can independently retrieve their equipment

cheap and free supplies
Cheap and free supplies
  • Balloons and beach balls-

Use these to substitute for sport balls to reduce amount of force needed to manipulate the ball

Example

  • Use this for students who don’t have the power, coordination, or range of motion needed to bump a volleyball
  • Use this to assist in the skill of basketball passing against the wall
slide10
Great equipment to purchase1. Use blow up “hands “ for hitting balloons, birdies, tagging other students for children with mobility impairments

Use a large hand for a wait signal to children

with Autism or behavior disorders

great equipment to purchase
Great Equipment to Purchase

Use small baskets to be placed on a desk or lap tray for children who are wheelchair bound or have difficulty with strength and range of motion.

Use ribbon balls or balls with loops to assist with catching

great equipment to purchase12
Great Equipment to purchase

Koosh catchers – Use these to assist children with vision and mobility impairments to be able to play catch with a peer. Most can pull the ball off independently even if their grip strength and range of motion is very limited.

Smaller versions of the same ball will help children who have only physical impairments to feel like they are with their peers. Textured sport balls help students with grip and add sensory for children with

Autism.

slide13
Scoops and whiffle balls are great to use with students who are in a wheelchair and have limited mobility, range of motion, and coordination.

Children in wheelchairs, using crutches, children with Downs Syndrome who have a harder time catching due to smaller hands and coordination difficulties, CP due to the difficulty with force generation. These can even be used with children with severe movement disabilities as a peer or paraprofessional can stand very close and pass off the ball between scoops.

general modifications a child who has cp md or spina bifida
General modificationsA child who has CP, MD, or Spina Bifida

Reduce distance and power needed for the task (move them closer)

Use lighter, easier to manipulate equipment (sometimes smaller such as a junior football, sometimes larger such as a large hand glove to use as a paddle in badminton)

Use the elastic string tied to the object to foster independence and reduce the amount of time that they spend chasing the object

Use balloons and beach balls to substitute for sport balls if they have difficulty producing force and manipulating the ball.

Remember that for the safety of this child and others, a safety zone may be necessary during fast paced game play

* DO NOT TO USE LATEX IF THEY HAVE SPINA BIFIDA– 40 % have a severe allergy-most commonly used would be balloons or latex gloves

general modifications a child who has mobility impairments
General ModificationsA child who has mobility impairments
  • Reduce distance and power needed for task (move closer)
  • Use lighter, easier to manipulate equipment such as a playground ball instead of a basketball for passing
  • Use the elastic string tied to the object to foster independence so that they can reach the item
  • Have them do upper body cardio exercises such as arm lifts during warm-up exercises such as jumping jacks
  • Let them move with the other students on the inside of the track for safety for part of the time
  • Remember that for the safety of this child and others, a safety zone may be necessary during fast paced game play
general modifications a child who has vision impairments
General ModificationsA child who has vision impairments
  • Reduce the distance for target and partner throw and catch
  • Use a brighter, larger ball to help with tracking
  • Use a lighter ball or balloon to allow longer reaction time – as it enters their vision field, they have enough time to react
  • Use a pie tin to help at target stations so they can hear successful hits
  • Have a peer buddy or paraprofessional run laps with them, or use a peacock feather, cut foam noodle, etc. that needs to stay in contact with the wall as they run. Have them run slightly outside of the line and peers be watchful to avoid collisions.
general modifications a child who has hearing impairments
General ModificationsA child who has hearing impairments
  • Use a microphone, megaphone if possible- especially when outside. If you do not have one, purchase an emergency siren in a can (hardware store) or a very loud whistle that you are sure they can hear from the full distance of activity.
  • Use a peer buddy or paraprofessional near them to help with demonstrations or assistance during activity
  • Make simple written or illustrated(even stick figures will get the idea across) cards for stations or directions for a game
  • Use digital camera when possible to show pictures of the activity, and equipment needed
  • Be sure to gain attention from them before beginning instruction.
  • Use a infrared pen light to get their attention during a game or activity so that all students do not have to stop
general modifications a child with autism
General modificationsA child with Autism

1 Establish a set routine for a warm-up.

  • Use picture cards and simple direction cards
  • Set time limits with a visual timer or specify number of repetitions
  • Allow breaks with the student’s preferred activity. Use a first this, then that technique when you want them to complete a task
  • Make a task schedule chart for them to move when task is completed. Have velcro attachments on station cards for them to move when finished

6. Build in spinning, balancing, bouncing, and /or applying pressure or other sensory stimulation such as brushing arms with a hairbrush, using a body sock or squeezing them inside a mat or with a paraprofessional or teacher hands

general modifications a child with a behavior disorder
General modificationsA child with a behavior disorder

1. Preview lesson activity briefly with them if possible before school, or send a written simple form to their class with a brief summary

  • Establish a signal with that student where they can let you know if they are becoming agitated.
  • Establish a routine of “cool down” activities or acceptable “cool down” areas.
  • Do not require them to perform in front of others unless they wish to do so.
  • Position yourself closely to them during competitive activities, skill tests, or cooperative tasks to keep other children safe from possible violent outbursts
  • Establish an emergency system for contacting the office for help if they become violent or use excessive profanity
general modifications a child with downs syndrome
General modificationsA child with Downs Syndrome

1. Use alternate equipment that is smaller due to smaller hands

  • Use picture cards or short phrase directions at stations
  • Provide a peer partner or paraprofessional to assist with demonstrations, reminders, and focus
  • Stick to 2-3 word cues such as “step and throw”. Repeat every time and then have them repeat the words
  • Use first this, then that to keep them on task.
equipment resources
Equipment Resources
  • http://www.palossports.com/about.cfm
  • Palos sports (local Illinois company)
  • http://www.flaghouse.com/default.asp?Category=Athletic (Flaghouse and Sporttime) adapted basketball nets, large sand timers
  • http://www.us-games.com/ (US Games)
  • http://www.ssww.com/ (S&S Discount)
  • http://chinaberry.com/ (Chinaberry)-Twizzler
ad