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Leadership For Student Learning What It is and How It Works. Ken Leithwood. School leadership is second only to classroom instruction as an influence on student learning. THE EVIDENCE . . . Qualitative case studies of exceptional or “turnaround” schools

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Presentation Transcript
the evidence
THE EVIDENCE . . .
  • Qualitative case studies of exceptional or “turnaround” schools
    • very large effects on both school conditions and student learning
  • Large scale quantitative studies of leadership effects on student learning and on student engagement
    • 5-7% variation across schools : total from all school sources is 12-20%

iii. Leadership succession studies

for reviews of this evidence see for example
For reviews of this evidence, see, for example….

Hallinger & Heck (1996)

Waters, Marzano & McNulty (2003)

Leithwood & Jantzi (2007)

Robinson, Lloyd & Rowe (2008)

almost all successful school leaders draw on the same repertoire of basic leadership practices
Almost all successful (school) leaders draw on the same repertoire of basic leadership practices.
p f m a s
P = f (M, A, S)

P = teacher’s performance

M = teacher’s motivation

A = teacher’s abilities, professional knowledge and skills

S = work settings and features of their school and classroom

leadership tasks funtions or practices

Setting Directions (Motivation)

LEADERSHIP TASKS, FUNTIONS OR PRACTICES

Developing People (Ability)

Redesigning the Organization (Setting)

Improving the Instructional Program (attending to the “technical core”)

slide8

GroupGoals

Vision

SettingDirections

Communication

Expectations

slide9

IntellectualStimulation

Modeling

DevelopingPeople

IndividualizedSupport

slide10

Families and Communities

Culture

Redesigningthe Organization

Connections

Structures

slide11

ResourceAllocation

Staffing

ImprovingtheInstructional Program

Monitoring

Buffering

for more on this see
For more on this, see…

Leithwood, K. & Riehl, C. (2005). What we already know about successful school leadership.

In W. A. Firestone & C. Riehl (Eds.), A new agenda: directions for research on educational leadership. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

.

slide13
It is the enactment of the same basic leadership practices – not the practices themselves – that is responsive to the context.
for example culture building part of organizational redesign
For example, “culture building”, part of Organizational Redesign
  • Stage 1: teacher isolation; no expectations for collaboration among teachers
  • Stage 2: model and clarify expectations for collaborative work by teachers
  • Stage 3: refresh, extend expectations; refine nature of collaborative work to increase effects on quality of instruction

and

from focused to distributed sources of leadership

for more on this see1
For more on this, see….

Leithwood, K., Harris, A., & Strauss, T. (2010). Leading School Turnaround. San Francisco: Jossey Bass

four paths of leadership influence on student learning
Four Paths of Leadership Influence on Student Learning

RationalPath (Academic press, Disciplinary climate, TLCPs)

LSA Initiatives

School-wideExperience

EmotionsPath (Efficacy, Trust)

Leadership Practices

StudentLearning

OrganizationalPath (Time, PLC)

FamilyPath (Expectations, Reading

ClassroomExperience

for more on this see2
For more on this, see

Leithwood, K., et al (2010). School leaders’ influence on student learning: The four paths, In T. Bush, L, Bell and D. Middlewood (Eds.),The principles of educational leadership and management. London: Sage publishers

[Leithwood, K., Patten, S., Jantzi, D. (in press). Testing a conception of how school leaders influence student learning, Educational Administration Quarterly]

for more about how leadership influences the emotional path see
For more about how leadership influences the emotional path, see….

Leithwood, K., Beatty, B. (2008). Leading with teacher emotions in mind. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

school leadership has a greater influence on schools classrooms and students when it is distributed
School leadership has a greater influence on schools, classrooms and students when it is distributed
rating of leadership sources by quintiles based on student achievement1
RATING OF LEADERSHIP SOURCES BY QUINTILES BASED ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
  • Schools in the highest quintile attributed relatively high levels of influence to all sources of leadership
  • Schools in the lowest quintile attributed relatively low levels of influence to all sources of leadership
  • Highest quintile schools, as compared to the lowest, differed most in ratings of teams, parents and students
  • Principals were rated as having highest influence in schools in ALL quintiles
for more on leadership distribution see
For more on leadership distribution, see

Leithwood, K., Mascall, B., Strauss, T. (Eds.) (2009). Distributed leadership according to the evidence. New York, NY: Routledge.

a final observation
A final observation….
  • Districts make a big difference to a school’s improvement efforts
  • The instructional leadership role of district leaders
  • The importance of building collective school leader efficacy

for more on this see……………….

slide29

Louis, K., Leithwood, K., Wahlstrom, K., Anderson, S.

(2010). Learning from leadership: Investigating the links to improved student learning. New York: Final report of research to the Wallace Foundation.