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Talk Tracks Selling System - 2016 Workbook PowerPoint Presentation
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Talk Tracks Selling System - 2016 Workbook - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Talk Tracks communicate what you do, how you do it, what results you deliver and for whom you work with.

The goal is to begin a relationship with your messages that turns prospects into customers.

By nailing the “what, how, why and for whom”, in a clear, concise and relevant way, you build a powerful foundation for all your sales and marketing communications.

You can build your brand touch points consistently and deeply demonstrate your unique expertise.

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Talk Tracks Selling System - 2016 Workbook


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    1. Talk Tracks communicate what you do, how you do it, what results you deliver and for whom you work with. The goal is to begin a relationship with your messages that turns prospects into customers. By nailing the “what, how, why and for whom”, in a clear, concise and relevant way, you build a powerful foundation for all your sales and marketing communications. You can build your brand touch points consistently and deeply demonstrate your unique expertise. COMMON MISTAKES: Winging It – Making it up on the spot when you are introducing yourself or networking is a sure fire way to miss opportunities or give inaccurate impressions. “Wining it” is what you do when your preparation fails. • Inconsistency – Does everyone get a different version of “What you do?” How can people refer your brilliant solutions if they aren’t getting the rock solid understanding of your competencies? • Jargon/Technical – Do you get the “Huh?” face or glazed over eyes from your listeners? You might be speaking a different language in your zeal to sound important or like an expert. • Unconvincing – If you’re hearing your Talk Track for the first time – when it comes out of YOUR mouth, you probably sound unconvincing or unsure of what you do for people. • Dull – Is your introduction a snooze? Dull, bland, boring and common introductions don’t set you apart or leave a memorable first impression. • WHAT DO GREAT SALES AND MARKETING MESSAGES LOOK LIKE? • Clear – I know exactly who you work with, how you’re different and what results you produce when I first meet you. Compelling – I want to know more about you. You’ve piqued my interest and engaged me, holding my attention. • Relevant – You help me understand how you are relevant to me, how you can help or be a resource for me. You’ve made me feel connected to you and not like you’re playing a highlight reel of your accomplishments or reading your own brochure to me. • Consistent – Your clear message is consistent – when I meet you in person, visit your website, connect with you on LinkedIn or in your business – YOU communicate your messages consistently. • Extraordinary – You create a memorable, distinct and unique first impression. • © Copyright, The Selling Agency, 2016. All rights reserved. Cannot be reproduced or reprinted without express written permission of The Selling Agency. Follow us @SellingAgency and TheSellingAgency.com

    2. PURPOSE: Like a Cover Letter – you’re inviting a prospect to “Read Your Resume” Your Goal is to generate these questions: “Oh, Wow, I need your card!” “How do you do that?” “I want to hear more about that” “Would you also do . . . ?” INTENTION: •Start a Conversation – there is no selling here •Connect with Empathy and Relevance •Start with a hook – Focus on Delivery to invoke further interest •Deliver Details – Don’t be vague, details engage and make you “sticky” •Know what’s next – a meeting, an invitation, a webinar, visit website . . . •This process, executed well, should pre-qualify potential customers STRUCTURE: Identify what problems you solve. Ask a question about a situation that they may have encountered. Make a bold statement in a strong voice. Highlight a pain point, or something that stops them in their tracks. Use Humor, Empathy, Statistics, Poke their bruise – but never use Gimmicks or anything out of context or out of character. Define who you work with. Let your listener know exactly who benefits from knowing you. What customers do you serve? Give specific descriptions – industry, size, what problems they face. Demonstrate and Relate what results you get. Use action and strong words to show how easy it is to do business with you and how you change their existing conditions. Use details and specific attributes that are unique to you and your business. Give a brief but specific example of a before/after problem you solved. Have several stories with rich details – places, problems, dollars, percentages – real values you were able to impact. *Invite to Take Action – what are the next steps, what piqued their talk in depth about their problems, do they need to hear more examples of what you deliver? interest, are they ready to USE SITUATIONAL AWARENESS: Having a general understanding of your audience and your potential relationship determines which details you present to the target audience. © Copyright, The Selling Agency, 2016. All rights reserved. Cannot be reproduced or reprinted without express written permission of The Selling Agency. Follow us @SellingAgency and TheSellingAgency.com

    3. Pieces of Your Communication Puzzle – Use adjectives and verbs that are purposeful: painful, strong, emotional – paint a picture through your expertise. *Use Action Oriented Words *Specifics/Details make you “sticky” and memorable *Load Examples for each target market/audience Problems You Solve {the Before} Results You Produce {the After} Who Do You Help {Ideal Clients, Who has these problems} Examples {Specific Problems and Results} Leading Questions {Engagement and Probing for Conversation} © Copyright, The Selling Agency, 2016. All rights reserved. Cannot be reproduced or reprinted without express written permission of The Selling Agency. Follow us @SellingAgency and TheSellingAgency.com

    4. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: Prospects ask, “What do you do?” {Target market} hires me when . . . “ or “bring me on board if . . . “ {Identify what problems you solve}. Shows interest or asks for more information – “I help them to achieve” or “With my experience,” {demonstrate or relate what results you get}. Continues interest – “A technology services company brought us on board and . . . “ or “Just last week,” {Specific Example – brief}. Reciprocate interest – “Tell me about what you do? What problems do you solve for people?” or “Who is an ideal client for you?” Invite to Take Action – “Let’s connect on Linked In,” or “Can I email you? Add you to our mailing list?” “What’s your website”, “I’d like to connect with you to discuss your business further” et cetera. Notes: •Words to Kill by (kill credibility, momentum, confidence – kill them): “ just, basically, like, well, what we do is, our company does/is, little, you know”. •You are not selling. If they’re not interested, stop talking. •Ask questions {leading}. •Use “active” listening. Silence is for comprehension. Silence/pauses are OK. •Cool as a cucumber: confidence, conversation and authenticity rule •Multiple stories in your back pocket, modify/adjust per audience. •Alternate – before answering more, ask about the prospect •Have a plan for who you want to meet and what to accomplish. •Study Body Language and Non Verbal Communication. •Practice, Practice, Practice. © Copyright, The Selling Agency, 2016. All rights reserved. Cannot be reproduced or reprinted without express written permission of The Selling Agency. Follow us @SellingAgency and TheSellingAgency.com