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SAT Review. A review, created by students of the SAT Preparation class, of Up Your Score! The Underground Guide to the SAT (2008). About the SAT Critical Reading Critical Writing Guessing. About the SAT.

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Sat review

SAT Review

A review, created by students of the SAT Preparation class, of

Up Your Score! The Underground Guide to the SAT (2008).

About the SAT

Critical Reading

Critical Writing

Guessing


Sat review

About the SAT

  • The SAT was developed in 1927 because colleges wanted an objective way of comparing students

  • On the SAT, there are nine sections (three sections for math, three sections for reading, and two sections for writing)

  • SAT score range : 600~2400PSAT is a preliminary look at the real SAT.

  • PSAT makes you eligible for all sorts of scholarship programs.

  • Many students take the SAT in October or November in order to meet the deadlines for Early decision and Early Action.

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


Sat review

About the SAT

  • An Author’s Note Intended to Build Confidence

    • How should I prepare the day before the SAT?

  • Be Prepared.

  • Be Mellow

  • Get Pumped

  • Be Superstitious

  • Be Inspired

  • Be Together

    - These methods are used by authors of the book.

    Chose the one that is best suited to you or find one yourself.

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


Sat review

About the SAT

  • The Story of the Evil Testing Serpent

    • Who makes up the SAT?

  • The test is made by the Educational Testing Service in New Jersey.

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


Sat review

About the SAT

  • SAT Scoring

    • The raw score is solely about the questions you got right minus a fraction of a point for each question you got wrong.

    • Your percentile is based on the percent of test takers who had a lower raw SAT score than you

    • They deduct points when you get questions wrong.

    • You can get a perfect score in math when you get 1 question wrong.

    • You can get a perfect score in reading when you get 3 or 4 questions wrong.

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


Sat review

About the SAT

  • SAT Mistakes

    • If you really think a question is unfair---not just that you don’t know the answer, even though we all think those are unfair----there is a possibility that it is a mistake.

    • The procedure for challenging a question is in the registration bulletin and your proctor should be able to help you as well.

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


Sat review

About the SAT

  • SAT Services

    • Scores by Phone

    • You can get your score by phone, but you need to pay.

    • Score Sender

    • You can send your score to 4 colleges for free.

    • Registering by Phone or Online

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


Sat review

About the SAT

  • How to Practice

    • 1. Get the booklet “Taking the SAT Reasoning Test”, published by the College Board.

    • 2. Get the book The Official SAT Study Guide, published by College Board.

    • 3. Take advantage of the SAT and College Board services.

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


About the sat

About the SAT

About the SAT

  • Getting in Gear

    • Set a Score Goal

    • Block Out Time in Your Schedule

    • Study with Friends

    • Treat It Like the Real Thing

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


Sat review

About the SAT

  • Up your Score Cheat Sheet

    • For those Pressed for Time and/or Motivation

      Chapter 1, About the SAT

      Chapter 2, The Critical Reading Section

      Chapter 3, The Math Section

      Chapter 4, The Writing Section

      Chapter 5, Guessing

This slide is maintained by: Eunsouk Jang


The short reading passages

The Short Reading Passages

The Critical Reading Section

-Example: of a short passage

  • Among young college students, a trend is emerging. Today more than ever, these hardworking people are being saddled with skyrocketing tuition, book fees, and boarding costs. So it is not surprising that many of them are taking desperate measures in order to pay the bills. There have been reports of 19 year olds selling their souls on eBay, blackmailing their siblings with grainy photos of tattoos that mom and dad don’t know about, and hunting for change on the ground under roller coasters. And, in a show of extreme anguish, some of these young people have been even, gasp, looking for work.

  • In line 4, the word “measures” is used to mean

    (A) events

    (B) quantities

    (C) actions

    (D) calculations

    (E) weights

  • According to the passage, the desperation many students feel is the result of

    (A) the impossibility of staying in college

    (B) the ever-increasing bill they have to pay

    (C) the poor relationship they are fostering with their brothers and sister

    (D) seeing that their souls are worth only $ 4.28 on eBay

    - Answer 1. (c) 2. ( b)

This slide is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


The critical reading section

The Critical Reading Section

The Critical Reading Section

  • Four Key Rules And A Tip

    Rule 1: Know Your Speed

    • Practice enough to know how fast you should move during the REAL SAT. 

    • The KEY is GREAT control of your speed and time on the real test.

      Rule 2: Do the Subsections in the Best Order

       Do sentence completions first because they take the least amount of time!

This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


Four key rules and a tip continued

Four Key Rules And A Tip Continued

The Critical Reading Section

  • Short answer questions are next.

  • Critical reading passages should be last because they are the longest.

  • When skipping around on the test, be sure you are filling in answers in the correct place on the answer sheet!

This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


Four key rules and a tip continued1

Four Key Rules And A Tip Continued

The Critical Reading Section

Rule 3: Realize That Questions Get Harder

  • The first question in a subsection is usually easy, and the last question is usually hard.

  • You know you’re going to skip questions, so skip hard ones.

  • The most tempting answer on harder questions is probably wrong, so be aware!

  • Remember that questions get harder within each subsection, not from section to section.


Four key rules and a tip continued2

Four Key Rules And A Tip Continued

The Critical Reading Section

Rule 4: Know the Directions

  • Directions don’t change, so don’t waste time!

  • Memorize them beforehand.

  • Quick Tip:

    • If you don’t know an answer on the test,

      mark it in the test booklet.

    • X for questions you don’t know

    • ? for the ones you think you can figure out

    • Review those questions if you have extra time.

  • This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


    Sentence completion

    Sentence Completion

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Look for context clues.

    • This section tests your sense of “sentence logic” and vocabulary.

    • Be very careful: words can make sense grammatically, but not logically.

    This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


    Sentence completion con t

    Sentence Completion Con’t

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Basic Pattern:

      • Read the sentence, skipping over the blank.

      • Read the sentence a second time: guess the missing word.

      • Guess if the answer will be a positive word of negative.

        • This helps with figuring out what type of word goes in blank.

      • Compare your guess with actual answers

      • Put in your answers and see if they make sense.

      • If answers make sense, go with that answer.

    This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


    Critical reading

    Critical Reading

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Passages followed by questions

      • Passages get harder as you go on and questions follow patterns.

      • Keep reading books to get better in this section because books help with analyzing.

      • Read as fast as you can, but at a rate where you can still understand passages.

      • No NEGATIVE thinking, positive attitudes ARE the key to critical reading.

    This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


    Strategies for the critical reading passages

    Strategies for the Critical Reading Passages

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Strategy 1

      • Skim questions before reading passages to get an idea of what the passage will be like.

      • Read only the questions

      • Don’t choose answers that start with something general.

      • When reading passages, circle anything that will be an answer to the questions.

      • Don’t get caught up in looking for the answers.

    This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


    Strategies for the critical reading passages continued

    Strategies for the Critical Reading Passages Continued

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Strategy 2:Ask yourself what the passage was about, but don’t spend all your time doing this.

    • Strategy 3: Look for the author’s main idea.

    • Strategy 4: While reading, underline the main sentence in each paragraph.

    • Strategy 5: If you have trouble finishing the verbal section, skip the last passage because you will have more time with questions that are easier.

    This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


    Strategies for the critical reading passages continued1

    Strategies for the Critical Reading Passages Continued

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Strategy 6

      • Be sure you can support your answer with evidence from the reading.

      • If choices to answers seem extreme, they are probably not the right answers.

      • When a question directs you to a line, read a couple of lines before that because you will have a better understanding.

    This slide is maintained by: Crystal Hitchcock


    The critical reading section1

    The Critical Reading Section

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Critical Reading Passages

      -The normal reading passages are either scientific, passages from a narrative, a historical passage about art, or a minority group.

      -Read the short introduction that is in italics because it will help you understand the passage and help define words and identify names.

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The critical reading section2

    The Critical Reading Section

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Scientific passages

      -When reading a Scientific passage Don’t worry about the scientific words you have never heard of.

      -The term will be either irrelevant or

      explained in the passage.

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The critical reading section3

    The Critical Reading Section

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Historical passages

      -When authors start listing examples, read the first example, then skip the rest of the examples and write “EX” in the margin near the list of examples.

      -When the author also refers to other historians that agree and disagree, circle the names of historians the author refers to. There may be a question on the test.

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The critical reading section4

    The Critical Reading Section

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Art and Fiction passages.

      -The art section is about literature, painting, sculpture, crafts, and music.

      -The literature passage will be an excerpt from a piece of literary fiction.

      -Its hard to predict what the passage is about, so don’t skim it too quickly. When you start to answer the questions, do not read deeply.

      - Pay attention to the author’s style and tone.

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The critical reading section5

    The Critical Reading Section

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Minority and Double passages

    • The minority passage makes the SAT easier for everyone—minorities and majorities. The passage is incredibly predictable. Therefore, many of the questions are giveaways.

    • Example- The authors attitude toward Chinese achievements mentioned in lines 1-45 is best described as one of (A) disbelief (B) admiration (C) anxiety (D) ambivalence (E) apathy

    • The only one of these choices that expresses a clearly positive attitude toward the Chinese is (B).

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The critical reading section6

    The Critical Reading Section

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Double Passage

      • consists of two separate passages that, according to the ETS opposes, supports, or in some way complements each other.

    • Read introduction

    • Read first passage

    • Do first passage questions

    • Read second passage

    • Do second passage questions

    • Do both passage questions

    • The questions on the first passage are about the first passage. It makes more sense to do the first passage questions immediately after reading the first passage.

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The double passages

    The Double Passages

    The Critical Reading Section

    • You should be able to tell easily whether the two passage agree or disagree. Often, the introduction will help by saying that the two passage have “ much in common” ( in which case they’ll probably agree) or “present two views” (in which case they’ll probably disagree).

    • If the context and subject matter of the two passage seem different, then their main points will almost certainly be similar, and vice versa.

    • A speech from ancient Greece and a speech from the Civil War (two different historical eras and locales) had the same view on war, and an essay on silent film and one on mime (two different art forms) showed the similarities between the two forms.

    • Another section had two passages on architecture, both from the twentieth century, and they disagree. If the two passages were written at different times or places or if they concern different subjects, and were written in the same time or place they probably disagree.

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The gigantic passage

    The Gigantic Passage

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Gigantic passage looks like an ordinary passage, but then it just keeps droning on and on and on and on. Unlike a regular passage, where you can read it, answer questions, and possibly have a minute or two left at the end to fix your hair, the Gigantic passage is meant to bore and overwhelm you.

      • The Gigantic passage can be as long as 110 lines, and there are no commercials to break it up.

      • Here’s how to beat it

      • Stand up when you get to the Gigantic passage

      • Stretch and get your blood pumping

        - The test directions do not forbid you to do these things

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The gigantic passage1

    The Gigantic Passage

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Gigantic passage tend to be in the order that the answers appear in the passages.

    • The answer to the first questions tend to be at the beginning of the passage.

    • The answer to the middle questions to the last questions tend to be at the end of the passage.

    • If the answer to questions 1 is about line 12 and the answer to question 3 is about line 20, then the answer to question 2 can be found between line 12 and line 20.

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The six question types

    The Six Question Types

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Type 1:General (Main Idea)

    • The author is primarily concerned with…

    • Which of the following titles best summarizes the passage?

    • The primary purpose of the passage is to…

    • Type 2: Explicit (facts)

    • According to the fourth paragraph, some economist feel that…

    • According to the passage, an atom of which of the following substance will split, release energy and more neutrons?

    • According to the passage, Margaret asked Mrs. Horn’s opinion because she…

    • Type 3: Implicit ( inferences, reading between the lines)

    • It can be inferred that the guild were organized as they were because…

    • It can be inferred that each of the following applies to the perfect except…

    • With which of the following statements about marketing would the author more likely agree?

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The six question types1

    The Six Question Types

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The Six Types of Question

      Type 4: Author’s Logic

    • What tone does the author take toward the chickens?

    • Which of the following best describes the development?

    • The author cites specific examples of the work of slave artisans primarily to…

      Type 5: Vocabulary-in-Context

    • The word “obtrusive” is used in line 12 to mean…

    • The phrase “underlying themes” (line 7) refer to the…

    • Which of the following best captures the meaning of the word “ alliance” in line 32?

      Type 6: Comparison ( Only on the double passage)

    • Which statement from passage 1 does not have parallel idea in passage 2?

    • How would the author of the passage 1 respond to the idea of the “crazy spoons” in passage 2?

    • Which statement is best supported by the two passages?

    This side is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The short reading passages1

    The Short Reading Passages

    The Critical Reading Section

    • The topics and strategies for tackling the short passages are essentially the same as those for the long passages. For one thing, if it is talking about the growth cycle of celery, at least it’s only going to be five lines long. It’s really hard to make someone fall asleep during a hundred-word passage.

    This slide is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    Short reading passages

    Short Reading Passages

    The Critical Reading Section

    -Example: of a short passage

    - Among young college students, trend is emerging. Today more than ever, these hardworking people are being saddled with skyrocketing tuition, book fees, and boarding costs. So it is not surprising that many of them are taking desperate measures in order to pay the bills. There have been reports of 19 year olds selling their souls on eBay, blackmailing their siblings with grainy photos of tattoos that mom and dad don’t know about, and hunting for change on the ground under roller coasters. And, in a show of extreme anguish, some of these young people have been even looked for work.

    • In line 5, the word “measures” is used to mean

      (A) events

      (B) quantities

      (C) actions

      (D) calculations

      (E) weights

    • According to the passage, the desperation many students feel is the result of

      (A) the impossibility of staying in college

      (B) the ever-increasing bill they have to pay

      (C) the poor relationship they are fostering with their brothers and sister

      (D) seeing that their souls are worth only $ 4.28 on eBay

      - Answer 1. (c) 2. ( b)

    This slide is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    About sat words

    About SAT Words

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Type 1: Almost- Normal Words

    • Words that you would encounter in the course of doing your homework, listening to articulate people, or watching TV.

    • Now that you are training for the SAT, you will have to start looking up any and all words you encounter.

    • Type 2: Decodable Words

    • Unusual words that they don’t expect you to know offhand but that you can figure out if you are clever.

      Example: the word decodable is a decodable word. You could decode it like this:

      ‘de”= take out; reverse

      “code”= words or symbols with secret meanings

      + “able” = capable of being

      ----------------------------------------

      Decodable= capable of being taken out of its secret meaning

    This slide is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    Memorizing sat words

    Memorizing SAT Words

    The Critical Reading Section

    • If you have a bad memory, its not because there is something wrong with your brain, its just that you haven’t learned how to memorize

      • The most important concept in memorizing things like vocabulary words is the mnemonic device.

      • A mnemonic device is any technique, other than pure repetition, that helps you memorize something.

      • Research has demonstrated that the most successful mnemonic device are visual. If you can associate a word with a picture, you will be more likely to remember the word.

    This slide is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    Flash cards and audio recording

    Flash Cards and Audio Recording

    The Critical Reading Section

    • Two Essential tools:

      • You must keep flash cards and an audio recorder by your side while you study. When you come to a word you don’t know, look it up and devote 12 seconds to thinking up a mnemonic device.

      • Then write the word on one side of a 3”x 5’’ card and its definition and your mnemonic device on the other.

    This slide is maintained by: Destinee Johnson


    The big bad writing section

    The Big Bad Writing Section

    The Writing Section

    3 Types of Question in the Writing Section

    • Usage Questions: Identifying Sentence Errors

    • Sentence Correction Questions: Improving Sentences

    • Revision-in-Context: Improving Paragraphs

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Type 1 usage questions

    Type 1: Usage Questions

    The Writing Section

    • In this section:

      • Assume words that aren’t underlined are correct

      • Find an error in one of the underlined portions of the sentence or passage

      • OR if there is no error—NO ERROR (duh)

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Remember

    Remember!

    The Writing Section

    • Read the whole sentence quickly but carefully

    • If you are sure of the answer, well, mark the bubble on the answer sheet

    • If you aren’t sure, read underlined portions carefully again and see if it follows 13 of the rules of the SAT Writing Test (except rule 9)

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Remember1

    Remember!

    The Writing Section

    • If you still don’t find an error, then you’re going to have to mark answer (E)

    • If you have time after you have completed the writing section review all questions you marked (E)

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Type 2 sentence correction questions

    Type 2: Sentence Correction Questions

    The Writing Section

    • On these types of questions select the answer choice that would best replace the underlined part of the question

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Remember2

    Remember!

    The Writing Section

    • Read the whole sentence!

    • Never read choice (a), it’s a waste of time

    • If you think the sentence is correct, pick choice (a)

    • If it is wrong, look for the sentence that will make it right

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Remember3

    Remember!

    The Writing Section

    • If you can’t decide on the right answer choose the one that is closest to the way Dan Rather would phrase it

    • If you still can’t figure it out, choose the shortest answer

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Type 3 revision in context

    Type 3: Revision-in-Context

    The Writing Section

    • These questions are sort of a combination of sentence correction questions and reading questions

    • These questions are short essays full of flaws

    • First you should read the passage quickly, and don’t mark the mistakes

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Notice

    Notice!

    The Writing Section

    • These questions look like the reading passage questions in the SAT but these questions never ask you about facts and ideas within the passage

    • You will still have to understand the passage, because fixing the mistakes requires comprehending the passage

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    The 13 rules of the writing test

    THE 13 RULES OF THE WRITING TEST

    The Writing Section

    • First, before the rules, make sure you know your:

      • Nouns

      • Pronouns

      • Verbs

      • Subjects

      • Objects

      • Prepositions

      • Singular Tenses

      • Plural Tenses

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 1 subject verb agreement

    Rule 1: Subject-Verb Agreement

    The Writing Section

    • Subject and verb must agree in number

    • So, isolate the subject and verb to make sure they match

    • If the subject is singular, the verb should be too

    • If the subject is plural, the verb should be too

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 2 noun pronoun agreement

    Rule 2: Noun-Pronoun Agreement

    The Writing Section

    • Singular subjects take singular pronouns

    • Plural subjects take plural pronouns

    • Some singular subjects include:

      • Each

      • Every

      • Either

      • Neither

      • One

      • No One

      • Everyone

      • Everybody

      • etc

    • When any of these words are the subject, the pronoun should be singular!

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 3 pronoun subjects and objects

    Rule 3: Pronoun Subjects and Objects

    The Writing Section

    SUBJECTSOBJECTS

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 3 cont

    Rule 3 Cont

    The Writing Section

    • The words on the left are subject and the words on the right are objects

    • You must know when to use the subjects and when to use the objects

      • Ex) I like hot dogs, but hot dogs don’t like me.

      • Who killed Bozo? Bozo killed whom?

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 4 pronoun consistency

    Rule 4: Pronoun Consistency

    The Writing Section

    • Pronouns should be consistent throughout a sentence. Once you use one pronoun you must carry it out throughout the sentence

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 5 correct tense

    Rule 5: Correct Tense

    The Writing Section

    • Make sure the time of an action is consistent

    • Look for key “time words” such as when, while, as, after, and so forth, and make sure the tenses make sense

    • Don’t mix past, present, and future tenses

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 6 adjectives and adverbs

    Rule 6: Adjectives and Adverbs

    The Writing Section

    • Adjectives describe nouns

    • Adverbs describe verbs or adjectives or other adverbs

      • Ex) Poindexter juggles good. WRONG!!!

        • Correct: Poindexter juggles well.

    • Ex) I ran slow. WRONG!!!

      • Correct: I ran slowly.

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 7 parallel construction

    Rule 7: Parallel Construction

    The Writing Section

    • Ideas that are parallel or related should be expressed in the same way.

      • Ex) I like spitting drooling, and to slurp.

      • WRONG!!!

        • Correct: I like spitting, drooling, and slurping.

        • Or: I like to spit, to drool, and to slurp.

        • Or: I lake to spit, droll, and slurp.

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 8 run on sentences and sentence fragments

    Rule 8: Run-on Sentences and Sentence Fragments

    The Writing Section

    • A run-on sentence is usually two complete sentences that are incorrectly joined by a comma instead of separated by a period or a semicolon.

      • Ex) J.P. ate the mysterious object, it was a noodle. WRONG!!!

        • Correct: J.P. ate the mysterious object. It was a noodle.

        • Or: J.P. ate the mysterious object; it was a noodle.

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 9 totally bogus sight questions

    Rule 9: Totally Bogus Sight Questions

    The Writing Section

    • These questions don’t test anything that has to do with your ability to write. They don’t even test your ability to identify correct grammar. They just test whether or not you can see a single wrong or missing letter.

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 9 cont

    Rule 9 Cont

    The Writing Section

    • Ex) Late in the war, the Germans, retreating in the haste, left many or their prisoners go free.

      • If you don’t read the sentence carefully, you probably didn’t see an error.

      • Those of us who missed this question saw the word let where we should have seen left.

    The moral of the story is READ CARFULLY!!!

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 10 dangling modifiers

    Rule 10: Dangling Modifiers

    The Writing Section

    • “Dangling modifier” is a fancy grammatical term for a simple concept.

      • Ex) Taking the test, his copy of Up Your Score was in his pocket.

    • This sentence implies that the copy of Up Your Score was taking the test.

    • Whenever a sentence begins with a phrase like “Taking the test,” which is supposed to describe a word in the sentence, the word that it modifies must come right after the modifying phrase.

    • Correct: Taking the test, he had his copy of

      • Up Your Score in his pocket.

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    Rule 10 cont

    Rule 10 Cont

    The Writing Section

    • Dangling modifiers will be on the sentence correction section of the test

    • Whenever you see a sentence with an “-ing” word or phrase at the beginning, be on the lookout for a dangling modifier

    This slide is maintained by: Whitney Schwartz


    The writing section

    The Writing Section

    The Writing Section

    Rule 11: Sentence Logic

    *Some sentences are grammatically correct but don’t say what the writer wants to say.

    Example: It was dark in the closet, and they managed to find the exit.

    Correct:Although it was dark in the closet, they managed to find the exit.

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    Sat review

    The Writing Section

    Rule 12: Commonly messed-up expressions

    *Become familiar with standard, formal English. (expressions can be messed up)

    Example:

    Since it’s a beautiful day, I’d just assume walk. (should be just as soon)

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    Sat review

    The Writing Section

    Rule 13: Logical comparison

    * In a comparison, make sure you compare like things.

    Example:

    . My mother’s salary is higher than Jane’s mother.

    Correct: My mother’s salary is higher than Jane’s mother’s.

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    Sat review

    The Writing Section

    Things to be careful of:

    . Don’t split infinitives. “to slowly walk” should be “to walk slowly.”

    .No slang or clichés

    .Either w/or ; neither w/ nor

    . Don’t use They w/ a country.

    *The United States is rich. They have a big industry. (wrong)

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    Sat review

    The Writing Section

    The Essay:

    . Prepare in advance the subjects you are prepared to write on.

    . Stick to one subject; otherwise you are bound to wander.

    . If the essay question does not fit your research, you always have personal experience as a back up.

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    Sat review

    The Writing Section

    Make the essay concise & readable!!

    Practice!!

    . It’s okay to make stuff up as long as it makes sense.

    *Example:

    The reason Malcolm X is still alive today… (Doesn’t make sense)

    Do –It-Yourself essay formula

    *The Introduction

    *The Meal

    *The Good-bye

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    Guessing

    Guessing

    Impostors From Hell

    Tricky wrong answer choices are known as Impostors!

    The Serpent decided to include among the answer choices answers a student would most likely come up with but are wrong.

    Impostors are used in both the Critical Reading and Math sections.

    Guessing

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    Guessing1

    Guessing

    “He is often lauded for pursuing a philosophy that is progressive in spirit and yet practical in application.”

    In the line above the word “spirit” means

    A) apparition B)psyche C)vigor D) disposition E) sentiment

    To answer this question correctly, you must realize that the “spirit” of the philosophy is the essential disposition behind it.

    Guessing

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    Sat review

    If x+y=2, then x+y-4=?

    A) -2 B)0 C)2 D)4 E)6

    The answer is (A). The Serpent put (C) in case a student left the minus sign out. (E) in case a student added a 4 instead of subtracting it. (B) in case a student decided x and y are eachequal to each 2.

    The Impostors are B,C, and E.

    Guessing

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    Sat review

    The Specter of World Destruction

    If you make an educated guess, or eliminate one of the choices , then the odds will be decidedly in your favor and guessing can increase your score.

    An educated guess occurs when you know some information about the question or the answers.

    Guessing

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    The six rules of guessing

    The Six Rules of Guessing

    Guessing


    Rule 1 one of these things is most like the others

    Rule 1: One of these things is most like the others

    • On the SAT most answers, particularly in the math section, will be baited. Most of the time the answers will be similar, but with a slight variation, for example:

      • A. -3/7 B.3/2 C.-3/2 D. 5 3/2

    • All of the answers are similar but a coefficient or and negative sign can be used to bait you into picking the wrong answer.

    Guessing

    This slide is maintained by: Devon Mayfield


    Rule 2 problems increase in difficulty as you go along

    Rule 2: Problems increase in difficulty as you go along.

    • Keep in mind that difficulty increases as you go along in the section.

    • If you are at the end of the section, don’t settle for the easily calculated answer because it is a worm on a hook to get you to bite.

    • Make sure that you go so far as to draw out the problem to make sure that you have fully calculated the problem.

    Guessing

    This slide is maintained by: Devon Mayfield


    Rule 3 three s a crowd

    Rule 3: Three’s a crowd

    • Sometimes repeat, and you may end up with a couple answers in a row. DON’T FREAK OUT!

    • Stay confident in your answers, but remember these rules.

    • In 20 tests, there were 9 triples statistically there should’ve been 24.

    • There were 4 home-runs when there should’ve been 9 according to the laws of probability.

    • If for 2 questions C was your answer, rule it out in the following question

    • If you choose D for 15, skip 16, and choose D for 17, when you guess for 16 DON’T GUESS D

    • Still, even if you have a triple, keep your confidence in your answers

    Guessing

    This slide is maintained by: Devon Mayfield


    Rule 4 choose an answer that contains the number represented in the most answer choices

    Rule 4: Choose an answer that contains the number represented in the most answer choices

    Commonly in the Critical Reading and Math sections there will be a question with answers like

    A.I

    B.I and II

    C. I and III

    D. I, II, and III

    Since I appears in all, and from your reading I is true, More than likely that will be your answer; but if you are in a predicament about an answer, use this rule along with good judgment for your answer

    Guessing

    This slide is maintained by: Devon Mayfield


    Rule 5 pick nonanswers at the beginning not at the end

    Rule 5:Pick “Nonanswers” at the beginning, not at the end.

    • Sometimes in the math sections, you will be offered a “Cannot be determined” option.

    • If it is offered at the beginning of the section, you have a 50 percent chance of getting it right.

    • If it’s at the end, chances are good that it is wrong, BUT if you think it’s right go with your confidence.

    Guessing

    This slide is maintained by: Devon Mayfield


    Sat review

    Rule 6: In the reading section, beware of answers choices that express and opinion to strongly or that make and absolute statement.

    • In the critical writing section, you are often given questions that are guessable

    • The author’s attitude toward Aristotle’s writings is best described as one of…

      • A. unqualified endorsement

      • B. apologetic approval

      • C. analytical objectivity

      • D. skeptical reserve

      • E. scholarly dissatisfaction

    • Eliminate C and D because they are redundant

    • It will more than likely will be positive

    • USE GOOD JUDGEMENT

    • If you know the answer, DON’T GUESS!

    Guessing

    This slide is maintained by: Devon Mayfield


    Sat review

    Go and score high on your writing!!

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    Good luck

    Good Luck !


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