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FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT. The Articles of Confederation and The U.S. Constitution. THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION. This document was designed to give little power to a central government. Most of the power went to the individual states. VS. WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION.

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Forming a new government

FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT

The Articles of Confederation

and

The U.S. Constitution


The articles of confederation

THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

  • This document was designed to give little power to a central government.

  • Most of the power went to the individual states.

    VS


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation1

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation2

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation3

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Quarrels among states and

difficulty trading with foreign

countries.

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation4

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Quarrels among states and

difficulty trading with foreign

countries.

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all

Congress has no powers to

enforce it’s laws.


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation5

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Quarrels among states and

difficulty trading with foreign

countries.

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all

Congress has no powers to

enforce it’s laws.

The states had to enforce all

laws.


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation6

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Quarrels among states and

difficulty trading with foreign

countries.

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all

Congress has no powers to

enforce it’s laws.

The states had to enforce all

laws.

Nine states had to agree on

new laws.


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation7

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Quarrels among states and

difficulty trading with foreign

countries.

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all

Congress has no powers to

enforce it’s laws.

The states had to enforce all

laws.

Nine states had to agree on

new laws.

Difficult to enact laws.


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation8

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Quarrels among states and

difficulty trading with foreign

countries.

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all

Congress has no powers to

enforce it’s laws.

The states had to enforce all

laws.

Nine states had to agree on

new laws.

Difficult to enact laws.

All thirteen states had to

agree to amend the Articles


Weaknesses of the articles of confederation9

WEAKNESSES OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

OUTCOME

WEAKNESS

Congress had no power to levy

Or collect taxes

The government was always

short of money

Quarrels among states and

difficulty trading with foreign

countries.

Congress had no power to

Regulate trade at all

Congress has no powers to

enforce it’s laws.

The states had to enforce all

laws.

Nine states had to agree on

new laws.

Difficult to enact laws.

All thirteen states had to

agree to amend the Articles

There was no practical way

to change the government


Forming a new government

The government had no

Executive Branch

WEAKNESSOUTCOME


Forming a new government

The government had no

Executive Branch

There was no effective way

to coordinate the government

WEAKNESSOUTCOME


Forming a new government

The government had no

Executive Branch

There was no effective way

to coordinate the government

WEAKNESSOUTCOME

There was no national

court system.


Forming a new government

The government had no

Executive Branch

There was no effective way

to coordinate the government

WEAKNESSOUTCOME

There was no national

court system.

There was no way to settle

disputes between states.


Forming a new government

The government had no

Executive Branch

There was no effective way

to coordinate the government

WEAKNESSOUTCOME

There was no national

court system.

There was no way to settle

disputes between states.

The government could not

raise an Army


Forming a new government

The government had no

Executive Branch

There was no effective way

to coordinate the government

WEAKNESSOUTCOME

There was no national

court system.

There was no way to settle

disputes between states.

The government could not

raise an Army

The government could not

protect the people or the land


Forming a new government

  • All of these problems when lumped together made it impossible to run the new country.

  • Changes had to be made and quickly if the US was going to survive.


Forming a new government

  • Proof of a weak government appeared when SHAY’S REBELLION occurred.

  • Farmers were thrown off their land for not paying their taxes.

  • Daniel Shays led a rebellion that had to be stopped by the Massachusetts militia.


Two accomplishments of the articles of confederation

Two Accomplishments of the Articles of Confederation

  • 1.) Land Ordinance of 1785 – Set up a system of dividing the land in the Northwest Territory.

    • Land divided into Townships with “36 one-square mile” sections.


Forming a new government

  • The Government would take 4 sections (4 square miles) for their own use.


Forming a new government

  • The money from the sale of one section was set aside to pay for public schools.


Forming a new government

  • Anyone purchasing land from the government was required to buy one whole section

    (one -square-mile).

  • The rest of the land was sold to pay off the War Debt.


The northwest ordinance

THE NORTHWEST ORDINANCE

  • 2.) The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 set up a system of dividing the Northwest Territory into three, four or five smaller territories.

    • It also set up a system for territories to become states.


Forming a new government

  • Once settlers arrive a Governor is appointed by Congress


Forming a new government

  • Once 5,000 adult males establish residency they can elect a legislature to make laws.


Forming a new government

  • Once 60,000 people arrive in there, the territory can then apply for statehood.


Forming a new government

  • And – SLAVERY IS PROHIBITED in the Northwest Territory.


Changing the government

CHANGING THE GOVERNMENT

  • By 1787 it was determined that the Articles of Confederation were not working.

  • James Madison called for a meeting in Philadelphia to discuss changes to the Articles of Confederation.


The constitutional convention

THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

  • Every state sent delegates, except Rhode Island.

  • They were afraid that the convention was going to adopt a new Constitution.


Forming a new government

  • On May 25, 1787 George Washington was elected President of the Convention.

  • They first attempted to change the articles but that didn’t work.


Forming a new government

  • The decision was made to start a Federal Republic.

  • That’s a government that shares power between the national government and the government of the states, with elected representatives of the people.


The national government

THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

  • The National Government will be made up of three branches. Each branch being equal.


The legislative branch

THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

  • The Legislative Branch is made up of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

  • The Legislature is responsible for passing laws, ratifying treaties, approving Presidential appointments, overriding Presidential vetoes, etc.


The executive branch

THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH

  • Headed by the President and the Vice President. The responsibility of the executive Branch is to enforce the laws. The President also appoints judges, vetoes bills passed by Congress, makes treaties with foreign governments.


The judicial branch

THE JUDICIAL BRANCH

  • Made up of the Supreme Court and lower courts. The courts are responsible for interpreting laws. There is one Supreme Court, 13 District Courts and 3 Circuit Courts of Appeal in 1787.


Forming a new government

  • This guaranteed

    • A Separation of Powers.

    • Power was equal among the branches.

    • The National government has more power than the states.

    • No single part of the government becomes too powerful like a KING.


National gov t v state gov t

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH


National gov t v state gov t1

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Maintain an Army & Navy


National gov t v state gov t2

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War


National gov t v state gov t3

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money


National gov t v state gov t4

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries


National gov t v state gov t5

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers


National gov t v state gov t6

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers


National gov t v state gov t7

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers


National gov t v state gov t8

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers


National gov t v state gov t9

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers


National gov t v state gov t10

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers


National gov t v state gov t11

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Assume powers not given to national government or denied the states.

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers


National gov t v state gov t12

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Assume powers not given to national government or denied the states.

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers

  • Enforce its laws


National gov t v state gov t13

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Assume powers not given to national government or denied the states.

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers

  • Enforce its laws

  • Establish courts


National gov t v state gov t14

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Assume powers not given to national government or denied the states.

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers

  • Enforce its laws

  • Establish courts

  • Borrow money


National gov t v state gov t15

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Assume powers not given to national government or denied the states.

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers

  • Enforce its laws

  • Establish courts

  • Borrow money

  • Secure the safety & health of its citizens


National gov t v state gov t16

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Assume powers not given to national government or denied the states.

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers

  • Enforce its laws

  • Establish courts

  • Borrow money

  • Secure the safety & health of its citizens

  • Collect taxes


National gov t v state gov t17

NATIONAL GOV’T. v. STATE GOV’T.

NATIONAL

STATE

BOTH

  • Conduct elections

  • Establish schools

  • Regulate businesses

  • Establish local governments

  • Regulate marriages

  • Assume powers not given to national government or denied the states.

  • Maintain an Army & Navy

  • Declare War

  • Coin Money

  • Regulate trade between states & with foreign countries

  • Make laws necessary to carry out its powers

  • Enforce its laws

  • Establish courts

  • Borrow money

  • Secure the safety & health of its citizens

  • Collect taxes

  • Build roads


Compromises

COMPROMISES

  • Not everyone agreed with what is going into the Constitution.

  • Several compromises had to be made.


The great compromise

THE GREAT COMPROMISE

  • LARGE STATES wanted representation to be based on population. The more people you had – the more representation you had (The Virginia Plan).

  • SMALL STATES wanted representation to be equal. All states having the same power (The New Jersey Plan).


A bicameral legislature

A BICAMERAL LEGISLATURE

  • An agreement was reached to have a two house (Bicameral) legislature.

  • THE SENATE – representation would be equal with each state having two Senators.

  • THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES – representation would be based on population.


The 3 5 compromise

THE 3/5 COMPROMISE

  • Southern states wanted to count slave as part of their population.

  • Northern states were against this


Forming a new government

  • Compromise – Slaves will count as 3/5 of a person.


Compromise on trade

COMPROMISE ON TRADE

  • Northern states wanted a tax on imports to protect their businesses.

  • Southern states did not want to pay taxes on imported goods. They also did not want a tax on their exported crops.

  • The compromise was that there would be a tax on imports, but not on exports.


Ratification

RATIFICATION

  • In order for the Constitution to go into effect nine of the thirteen states had to ratify (approve) it.

  • FEDERALISTS were those in favor of ratification.

  • ANTI-FEDERALISTS were those opposed to ratification.


Forming a new government

  • Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia and Connecticut agreed to it.

  • Massachusetts agreed after a Bill of Rights was added.

  • Maryland, South Carolina and New Hampshire were next. After New Hampshire signed it the Constitution went into effect.

  • Then came Virginia, New York, North Carolina and Rhode Island in 1790.


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