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Chapter 9. CITIZENSHIP AND THE CONSTITUTION (1787–Present). Section 1: Understanding the Constitution Section 2: The Bill of Rights Section 3: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship. Section 1: Understanding the Constitution. OBJECTIVES.

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citizenship and the constitution 1787 present

Chapter 9

CITIZENSHIPAND THE CONSTITUTION(1787–Present)

Section 1: Understanding the Constitution

Section 2: The Bill of Rights

Section 3: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship

objectives

Section 1: Understanding the Constitution

OBJECTIVES
  • How did the framers of the Constitution try to balance state and federal powers?
  • What are the three branches of the federal government, and what are the requirements for membership in each branch?
  • How is power divided between the three branches of government?
balance of power

Section 1: Understanding the Constitution

Balance of Power

The constitution tried to balance the state and federal government by giving each the following powers:

  • Delegated powers – federal government
  • Reserved powers – state government
  • Concurrent powers – shared by state and federal government
requirements for membership

Section 1: Understanding the Constitution

Requirements for Membership
  • Legislative Branch
    • House of Representatives – 25 years old, U.S. citizen for 7 years, resident of state in which he or she is elected
    • Senate – 30 years old, U.S. citizen for 9 years, resident of the state he or she represents
  • Executive Branch – 35 years old, native born citizen, U.S. resident for 14 years
  • Judicial Branch – appointed by president for life, no special requirements
objectives1

Section 2: The Bill of Rights

OBJECTIVES
  • What are the main freedoms outlined within the First Amendment, and why are they important?
  • How does the Bill of Rights address colonial grievances listed in the Declaration of Independence?
  • What protections does the Bill of Rights give to people accused of crimes?
main freedoms outlined in the first amendment and their importance

Section 2: The Bill of Rights

Main Freedoms Outlined in the First Amendment and Their Importance
  • The First Amendment guarantees freedom of religion, press, speech, assembly and the right to petition.
  • These rights are important because they form the most basic rights of all citizens.
the second third and fourth amendments address colonial grievances

Section 2: The Bill of Rights

The Second, Third, and Fourth Amendments address colonial grievances.
  • Second – state militia
  • Third – no quartering of soldiers in peacetime
  • Fourth – no unreasonable searches and seizures/search warrants
the rights of the accused 5 th 6 th 7 th and 8 th amendments

Section 2: The Bill of Rights

The Rights of the Accused – 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Amendments
  • 5th Amendment – due process of law, indictment, no person forced to testify at his own trial, no double jeopardy
  • 6th Amendment – quick trial by jury, nature and cause accusation, confronted with the witness against him, obtaining witnesses in his favor, right to an attorney
the rights of the accused 5 th 6 th 7 th and 8 th amendments1

Section 2: The Bill of Rights

(continued)

The Rights of the Accused – 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Amendments
  • 7th Amendment – jury can decide civil cases
  • 8th Amendment – no excessive bail, fines, or cruel and unusual punishment
objectives2

Section 3: Rights andResponsibilities of Citizenship

OBJECTIVES
  • How can a person become a U.S. citizen?
  • What are some of the most important responsibilities of citizenship?
  • Why should citizens be involved with their community and government?
duties of citizens

Section 3: Rights andResponsibilities of Citizenship

Duties of Citizens
  • fulfill civic responsibilities
  • obey and know the laws
  • respect authority and the rights of others
  • pay taxes
  • protect the nation in time of danger
  • serve on juries
citizen involvement

Section 3: Rights andResponsibilities of Citizenship

Citizen Involvement

Citizens should be involved in their community and government to

  • strengthen their nation
  • help their neighbors
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