The role of the form tutor
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The role of the form tutor. Expectations. Leader Information source Administrator Surrogate ESW Link with other teachers/agencies. Surrogate parent. Dispenses praise & discipline (also on behalf of others) Requires loyalty and respect Has a sense of humour Personal physician Arbitrator

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The role of the form tutor

The role of the form tutor


Expectations

Expectations

  • Leader

  • Information source

  • Administrator

  • Surrogate ESW

  • Link with other teachers/agencies


Surrogate parent

Surrogate parent

  • Dispenses praise & discipline (also on behalf of others)

  • Requires loyalty and respect

  • Has a sense of humour

  • Personal physician

  • Arbitrator

  • Friend (?)


Throughout

Throughout

  • Register

  • Letters home/parental contact

  • Collecting money

  • Social - trips and excursions; dances and discos, cinema and such-like

  • PHSE

  • ‘Collective worship’ - thought for the day

  • Reports


Primary

Primary

  • Parent

  • Friend

  • Nursemaid

  • Confidante

  • Supporter

  • Fount of all knowledge

  • Trusted counsellor


Year 7

Year 7

  • Induction (starts in Year 6 or 5)

  • Rules and Regulations

  • Reading ages/NFER tests

  • Literacy

  • Numeracy

  • Teething troubles

  • New parents evening

  • Christmas party

  • End of term treat


Key stage 3

Key Stage 3

  • Year 8

    • Literacy

    • Numeracy

    • Christmas games/video

    • End of term treat

  • Year 9

    • SATS

    • Options

    • Christmas video: PG or cartoon?

    • Socials


  • Key stage 4

    Key Stage 4

    • Year 10

      • GCSE Coursework

      • Work Experience

      • Christmas Disco

      • End of term trip….

  • Year 11

    • GCSE Coursework

    • GCSE Revision

    • Careers interviews

    • Alton Towers (inevitably)

    • Leaving ‘prom’ or ball

    • The long goodbye!


  • Peer groups

    Peer groups

    “A peer group is not only a sounding box for ideas, with simultaneous conversations on different subjects, but also a testing ground to see what it feels like to hold certain attitudes. Naturally, the sense of belonging gives the attitudes an emotional edge, for these are not carefully finished opinion…”

    (Schachter The interaction of cognitive and physiological determinants of educational state. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology New York 1964)


    Peer groups1

    Peer groups

    “As part of the exploration of conflicting truths in the world the peer group is very important. Like adults, children learn as much from anecdotes and overheard remarks as from direct argument.”

    (Katz & Lazersfeld Personal influence, the part played by people in the flow of mass communications. Glencoe Free Press 1955)


    Form group dynamics

    (Form) group dynamics

    PREDICTABILITY

    “Meeting others for the first time we try to make them seem predictable in such a way that we can guide our own behaviour appropriately.”

    (Cognitive uncertainty theory)

    JUDGEMENT

    “We observe other peoples behaviour, attribute motives and intentions to them, and assess them”

    (Casual attribution theory)

    SHARING

    “We like others to the extent that we share important attitudes and beliefs”

    (Similarity attraction theory)

    BELONGING

    “We desire more than an individual relationship, wanting to be part of a recognisable group identity.”

    (Intergroup identity theory)

    MUTUAL ADMIRATION

    “We like those who seem to admire, like or respect us”

    (Gain - loss theory)

    Cullingford, C. : The Nature of Learning Cassell 1990


    Summary

    Summary

    • PREDICTABILITY = SAFETY; CERTAINTY; COMFORT ZONE

    • JUDGEMENT = ASSESSMENT; LOYALTY; BIAS

    • SHARING = BONDING; SOCIAL; FRIENDSHIP

    • BELONGING = GROUP IDENTITY; BE PART OF

    • MUTUAL ADMIRATION = STATUS; ACCEPTANCE; ADMIRATION; RESPECT


    Maslow s hierarchy of needs

    Maslow’s hierarchy of needs

    • Survival - ‘look after me, please’

    • Security - predictability, routine, comfort zone

    • Social - loyalty, friends, group identity

    • Status - leadership, support mechanism, place in group, notoriety

    • Self-actualisation - mutual admiration (within and across groups), respect


    The role of the form tutor

    Task

    • Brainstorm as many form teacher roles as possible;

    • Add links to other colleagues and outside agencies

    • Discuss the importance of the form teachers’ role.

    • Discuss your possible answers to the standard interview question “what do you consider to be the most important role of the form tutor?”


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