Pluralistic application project seeing students as multidimensional individuals
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Pluralistic Application Project: Seeing Students as Multidimensional Individuals. EDFN 725 Education in a Pluralistic Society Pat Larsen August 14, 2004. “Once a special education teacher, always a special education teacher.” (Dr. Patricia Fallbeck, Black Hills State University, 2000).

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Pluralistic application project seeing students as multidimensional individuals

Pluralistic Application Project: Seeing Students as Multidimensional Individuals

EDFN 725

Education in a Pluralistic Society

Pat Larsen

August 14, 2004


Pluralistic application project seeing students as multidimensional individuals

“Once a special education teacher, always a special education teacher.” (Dr. Patricia Fallbeck, Black Hills State University, 2000)

Inclusive Classroom


Students as multidimensional individuals

Students as Multidimensional Individuals

A closer examination under the umbrella...diversity at its best!

Multiple

Intelligences

Religion

Learning

Styles

Race

SES

Ethnic

Diversity

Cultural

Diversity

Language

Diversity

Gender

Family

Values

Exceptionality

Family

Traditions


Two strategies at work

Two Strategies at Work

  • Provide quality instruction for students with special needs.

  • Minimize prejudice with a zero tolerance policy for hateful or harmful words or actions.


Quality of instruction students with special needs all children

Quality of InstructionStudents with special needs = all children

  • Maintain an inclusive classroom

  • Continual self-reflection to monitor effectiveness of instruction

  • Teach to students’ learning styles

  • Create a constructivist classroom

  • Utilize cooperative learning

  • Incorporate technology

  • Parent/Guardian involvement encouraged

  • Capitalize on each student’s strengths/peer tutoring

  • Bring in “resident experts” from the Learning Center


Minimizing prejudice with a zero tolerance policy for hateful or harmful words or actions

Minimizing Prejudice with a Zero Tolerance Policy for Hateful or Harmful Words or Actions

“Do not tolerate harmful words, bullying or harassment in your classroom…As teacher, you are the model and norm setter: If you do not tolerate hurtful prejudice, your students will learn to honor and respect each other.”(Banks & McGee Banks, 2004)

  • Classroom Rules: Respect other people’s feelings, space, body and property.

  • Human Rights poster – outline expectations for treating others with kindness, dignity, and respect.

  • Cooperative group activities to promote tolerance and respect for all members of the class.


Our human rights

Our Human Rights

I have a right to be happy and to be

treated with compassion in this room:

This means that no one will laugh at me or hurt my feelings.

I have a right to be myself in this room:

This means that no one will

treat me unfairly because of my skin color,

fat or thin, tall or short, boy or girl, or by the way I look.

I have a right to be safe in this room:

This means that no one will

hit me, kick me, push me, pinch me, or hurt me.

I have a right to hear and be heard in this room:

This means that no one will yell, scream, shout, or make loud noises.

I have a right to learn about myself in this room:

This means that I will be free to express my feelings and

opinions without being interrupted or punished.

I have a right to learn according to my own ability:

This means no one will call me names because of the way I learn.


Classroom atmosphere to strive for

Classroom Atmosphere to Strive for…

“After accurate content, process is the most important part of teaching. Students who learn in an environment that is sensitive to their feelings and that supports and encourages the pursuit of knowledge will consistently meet new knowledge and new situations with the necessary openness and understanding for human development and progress.”

(Banks & McGee Banks, 2004)


References

References

Banks, J. & McGee Banks, C. (2004). Multicultural education: Issues and perspectives. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


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