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Mechanical Energy, Work and Power. D. Gordon E. Robertson, PhD, FCSB Biomechanics Laboratory, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. Energy. Ability to do work Measured in joules (J)

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Mechanical energy work and power
Mechanical Energy,Work and Power

D. Gordon E. Robertson, PhD, FCSB

Biomechanics Laboratory,

School of Human Kinetics,

University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Energy
Energy

  • Ability to do work

  • Measured in joules (J)

  • One joule is the work done when a one newton force moves an object through one metre

  • 1 Calorie = 1000 cals = 4.186 kJ

  • Can take many forms

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Forms of energy
Forms of Energy

  • Mass (E = mc2)

  • Solar or Light (solar panels, photovoltaic battery)

  • Electricity (electron flux, magnetic induction)

  • Chemical (fossil fuels, ATP, food)

  • Thermal or Heat

  • Mechanical energy

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Types of mechanical energy
Types of Mechanical Energy

  • Translational Kinetic = ½ m v2

    • v2 = vx2 + vy2 (+ vz2)

    • this is usually the largest type in biomechanics

  • Rotational Kinetic = ½ Iw2

    • this is usually the smallest type in biomechanics

  • Gravitational Potential = m g y

  • Elastic Potential = ½ k (x12 – x22)

    • Assumed to be zero for rigid bodies

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Laws of thermodynamics
Laws of Thermodynamics

  • Zeroth law

    • When two quantities are in thermal balance to a third they are in thermal balance with each other. I.e., they have the same temperature.

  • First Law (Law of Conservation of Energy)

    • Energy is conserved (remains constant) within a “closed system.”

    • Energy cannot be created or destroyed.

  • Second Law (Law of Entropy)

    • When energy is transformed from one form to another there is always a loss of usable energy.

    • All processes increase the entropy of the universe.

  • Third Law

    • Absolute zero (absence of all atomic motion) cannot be achieved.

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Law of conservation of mechanical energy
Law of Conservation of Mechanical Energy

  • If the resultant force acting on a body is a conservative force then the body’s total mechanical energy will be conserved.

  • Resultant force will be conservative if all external forces are conservative.

  • A force is conservative if it does no work around a closed path (motion cycle).

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of conservative forces

gravity

Examples ofConservative Forces

  • Gravitational forces

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of conservative forces1

frictionless surface

Examples ofConservative Forces

  • Gravitational forces

  • Normal force of a frictionless surface

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of conservative forces2

elastic collision

Examples ofConservative Forces

  • Gravitational forces

  • Normal force of a frictionless surface

  • Elastic collisions

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of conservative forces3

pendulum

Examples ofConservative Forces

  • Gravitational forces

  • Normal force of a frictionless surface

  • Elastic collisions

  • Pendulum

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of conservative forces4

ideal spring

Examples ofConservative Forces

  • Gravitational forces

  • Normal force of a frictionless surface

  • Elastic collisions

  • Pendulum

  • Ideal spring

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of conservative forces5

force

load

lever

fulcrum

Examples ofConservative Forces

  • Gravitational forces

  • Normal force of a frictionless surface

  • Elastic collisions

  • Pendulum

  • Ideal spring

  • Lever system

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of conservative forces6
Examples ofConservative Forces

Simple machines:

  • Pulleys

  • Block & tackle

  • Gears

  • Cams

  • Winch

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Examples of nonconservative forces
Examples ofNonconservative Forces

  • Dry friction

  • Air (fluid) resistance

  • Viscous forces

  • Plastic collisions

  • Real pendulums

  • Real springs

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Direct ergometry
Direct Ergometry

Treadmill Ergometry

  • External work = m g t v sin q

  • where, m = mass, g = 9.81, t = time, v = treadmill velocity, and q = treadmill’s angle of incline

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Direct ergometry1
Direct Ergometry

Cycle Ergometry

  • External work = 6 n L g

  • where, n = number of pedal revolutions, L = load in kiloponds and g = 9.81

  • Note, each pedal cycle is 6 metres motion of flywheel

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Direct ergometry2
Direct Ergometry

Gjessing Rowing Ergometry

  • External work = n L g

  • where, n = number of flywheel cycles, L = workload in kiloponds and g = 9.81

Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


Biomechanical methods
Biomechanical Methods

Point Mass Method

  • Simplest, least accurate, ignores rotational energy

  • Mechanical Energy = E = m g y + ½ m v2

  • External work = Efinal – Einitial

  • Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Biomechanical methods1
    Biomechanical Methods

    Single Rigid Body Method

    • Simple, usually planar, includes rotational energy

  • Mechanical Energy = E= mgy + ½mv2 + ½Iw2

  • External Work = Efinal– Einitial

  • Carriage load

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Biomechanical methods2
    Biomechanical Methods

    Multiple Rigid Body Method

    • Difficult, usually planar, more accurate, accuracy increases with number of segments

  • External Work =

    Efinal– Einitial

  • E = sum of segmental total energies (kinetic plus potential energies)

  • Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Biomechanical methods3
    Biomechanical Methods

    Inverse Dynamics Method

    • Most difficult, usually planar, requires force platforms

  • External Work =

    S ( S Mj wj Dt )

  • Sum over all joint moments and over duration of movement

  • Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Biomechanical methods4
    Biomechanical Methods

    Absolute Power Method

    • similar to previous method

  • Total Mechanical Work = S ( S |Mj wj| Dt )

  • Sum over all joint moments and over duration of movement

  • Notice positive and negative moment powers do not cancel (absolute values)

  • Internal Work =

    Total mechanical work – External work

  • Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Physiological methods
    Physiological Methods

    • Oxygen Uptake

      • Difficult, accurate, expensive, invasive

    • Physiological Work = c (VO2)

    • Where, c is the energy released by metabolizing O2 and VO2 is the volume of O2 consumed

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Mechanical efficiency

    Mouthpiece for collecting expired gases and physiological costs

    Mechanical Efficiency

    • Measure both mechanical and physiological costs

    • ME = mechanical cost divided by physiological cost times 100%

    Monark ergometer used to measure mechanical work done

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Mechanical efficiency1
    Mechanical Efficiency costs

    Internal work + External work

    ME = —————————————— × 100 %

    Physiological cost

    Internal work is measured by adding up the work done by all the joint moments of force. Most researchers ignore the internal work done.

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Work of a force
    Work of a Force costs

    Work of a Force is product of force (F) and displacement (s) when F and s are in the same direction.

    Work = F s (when F is parallel to s)

    = F s cos f (when F is not parallel to s

    and is f angle between F and s)

    = F . s = Fx sx + Fy sy+ Fz sz (dot product)

    = Ef – Ei (change of energy)

    = P t (power times time)

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Work of a moment of force
    Work of a Moment of Force costs

    Work of a Moment of Force is product of moment of force (M) and angular displacement (q).

    Work = Mq

    = r F (sin f) q (f is angle between r and F)

    = P t (power times time)

    = S (Mw Dt) (time integral of moment power)

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Average power
    Average Power costs

    Power is the rate of doing work.

    • measured in watts (W), 1 watt = 1 joule per second (J/s)

      Power = work / time (work rate)

      = (Ef – Ei) / time (change in energy over time)

      = (F s) / t = F v (force times velocity)

      = (Mq) / t = Mw (moment of force times

      angular velocity)

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Instantaneous power of a force or moment of force
    Instantaneous Power of a Force or Moment of Force costs

    Power = F v (when F is parallel to v)

    = F v cos f (when F is not parallel to v

    and is f angle between F and v)

    = F . v = Fx vx + Fy vy+ Fz vz (dot product)

    = Mw (moment times angular velocity)

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


    Isokinetic dynamometers
    Isokinetic Dynamometers costs

    KinCom 500H

    • Controls speed of motion therefore lever has constant angular velocity (w)

    • Measures force against a lever arm

    • Moment = force times lever arm

    • Instantaneous Power = moment times angular velocity

    hydraulically controlled motion

    lever arm

    force sensor

    Biomechanics Lab, U. of Ottawa


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