Immigration
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Immigration. Who is an Immigrant? . What is the difference between an immigrant and a citizen? Who is a native-born citizen? A person who was born within the country's territory and has been legally recognized as a citizen of that country since birth. Who is an alien?

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Immigration

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Immigration

Immigration


Who is an immigrant

Who is an Immigrant?

  • What is the difference between an immigrant and a citizen?

  • Who is a native-born citizen?

  • A person who was born within the country's territory and has been legally recognized as a citizen of that country since birth.


Immigration

  • Who is an alien?

  • Any person who is not a citizen or a national of the United States.

  • Who is a naturalized citizen?

  • A person who was born an

    alien but has lawfully become

    a citizen.


Permanent residents

Permanent Residents

  • A permanent resident is a person who is allowed to reside indefinitely within a country where he or she is not a citizen.

  • Permanent residents are usually eligible to work and to apply for citizenship by naturalization after a period of residency in the new country .

  • Under U.S. law, aliens who are granted permanent residency are formally known as “immigrants.”


Refugees

Refugees

  • Who is a refugee?

  • Are refugees different from immigrants?

  • How are they similar? How are they different?

  • Refugees have been forced to leave their home countries.

  • In the U.S., people who request refuge are known as “asylum seekers” until the government officially grants them protection.


Why do people immigrate

Why Do People Immigrate?

  • Join family

  • Escape famine

  • Political persecution

  • Religious persecution

  • Work opportunities

  • War

  • Natural disasters


Economic migrants

Economic Migrants

  • Who are economic migrants?

  • People who emigrate to seek jobs or improved financial status.

  • Governments do not generally recognize them as refugees.

  • What if the economy in their home country collapsed and they had to leave, in order to survive?

  • Should people in that situation be considered refugees? Why or why not?


Immigration rates in the u s 1790 1820

Immigration Rates in the U.S. 1790-1820


1820 1880

1820-1880


1880 1930

1880-1930


Immigration

YearNumber of Immigrants

1820 8,385 

1830   23,322 

1840   84,066 

1850  369,980 

1860  153,640 

1870  387,203 

1880  457,257

1890  455,302 

1900  448,572 

1910  1,041,570 

1920  430,001 

1930  241,700 

1940  70,756 

1950  249,187 


Immigration

  • During which period was immigration greatest?

  • Has war increased or decreased immigration?

  • How did the Great Depression affect the immigration rate?

  • Why do you think immigration increased in the decade between 1840 and 1850? What events in Europe might have contributed to this increase? What events in America might have contributed?

  • What factors might have contributed to the steep increase in immigration between 1900 and 1910?


Immigration

  • Improved transportation

  • In the 1890’s new steamships were developed, which could travel between Europe and the U.S. with greater speed.

  • Previously, travel across the Atlantic had taken about 3 months. On the new, improved steamships, immigrants could make the trip in 2 weeks.


Chinese passengers on deck

Chinese passengers on deck


Immigration primary sources

Immigration: Primary Sources

  • What social evils do critics associate with immigration?

  • Why do you think they associate these evils with immigration?

  • Cultural pluralism: different groups in society keeping their distinctive cultures while coexisting peacefully with the dominant group.

  • Which is the goal of American immigration--a "melting pot" or cultural pluralism?

  • Which do you think should be the goal?


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