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Integrating Principles of Improving Instruction Across Professions. Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum Instruction Conference Andrews University July 24 th , 2003. Julia Robinson Rob Ryan Melanie Wright. “Skillful teachers are made, not born.” -Fredism. Jones, 2003.

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Integrating principles of improving instruction across professions
Integrating Principles of Improving Instruction Across Professions

Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum Instruction Conference

Andrews University

July 24th, 2003

Julia Robinson Rob Ryan Melanie Wright


“Skillful Professionsteachers are made, not born.”

-Fredism

Jones, 2003


“Skillful Professionsschool psychologists are made, not born.”

-Groupism


“Skillful Professionseducational psychologists are made, not born.”

-Groupism


Objective of presentation
Objective of Presentation Professions

  • The participants will discuss key strategies for the implementation of improving instruction across disciplines by illustrating and modeling Danielson’s four domains in a cooperative group setting.


Domains
Domains Professions

  • What Are They?

    • Shared vocabulary

    • Structure for discussion

    • Sharpen focus

    • Communicates competencies

Danielson, 1996


Domain 1

Planning and Preparation Professions

Domain 1

  • The Skillful Educational Professional

  • Conscious

  • Deliberate

  • Determined

  • Clear

  • Learner


Domain 1 planning and preparation
Domain 1 – Planning and Preparation Professions

  • If you don’t know where you are going, you can’t get there.

    - Fredism

Jones, 2003


Domain 1 planning and preparation1
Domain 1 - Planning and Preparation Professions

  • Good Objective Writing

    • ABCD

      • Audience

      • Behavior

      • Condition

      • Degree

discuss key strategies for the implementation of improving instruction across disciplines

  • The participants will

by illustrating and modeling Danielson’s four domains

in a cooperative group setting.

Danielson, 1996


Domain 1 planning and preparation2
Domain 1 - Planning and Preparation Professions

  • Professional Application

    • Teachers(Danielson, 1996)

      • Preparation of objectives

      • Learning styles

      • Resource Gathering

    • School Psychologists

      • Ethics (McCoach & Kehle, 2001)

      • “Best” efforts (Bergan & Caldwell, 1995)

      • Professionalism (Goldstein, 1995)

    • Educational Psychologists (Danielson, 1996)

      • Teacher evaluation

      • Designs for instructions

      • Goals


Domain 2 professional climate
Domain 2 – Professional Climate Professions

  • Professional Climate

    • Culture

    • Procedures

    • Respect

  • Cinderella's slipper

  • Think Pair Share

Danielson, 1996


Domain 2 professional climate1
Domain 2 – Professional Climate Professions

  • Professional Application

    • Teachers

      • Social skills (Kagan, 1992)

      • Classroom management (Wong, 2001)

      • Organization of physical space (Danielson, 1996)

    • Educational Psychologists

      • Evaluate and assess classroom structure (Kagan, 1992)

      • Review teacher’s classroom procedures (Wong, 2001)


Domain 3 instruction
Domain 3 - Instruction Professions

  • Domain 3- Instruction

    • 5 Components

      • Communicating Clearly and Accurately

      • Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques

      • Providing Feedback to Students

      • Engaging Students in Learning

      • Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness

Danielson, 1996


Types of knowledge
Types of Knowledge Professions

  • Declarative Knowledge

    • What will the students know and understand

      • Construct meaning

      • Organize

      • Store

Construct

Meaning

Organize

LEARNING

Store

Marzono, 1997


Types of knowledge1
Types of Knowledge Professions

  • Procedural Knowledge

    • What processes and skills will the students are able to perform, both physical and mental

      • Construct Models

      • Shaping

      • Internalizing

Learning

Construct

Models

Shape

Internalize

Marzono, 1997


Domain 3 instruction1
Domain 3 - Instruction Professions

  • Professional Application

    • School Psychologists

      • Clarifying teacher objectives (Bergan & Caldwell, 1995)

      • Determining cause of delay (McCoach & Kehle, 2001)

    • Educational Psychologists(Marzono, 1997; Danielson, 1996; Wong, 2001)

      • Evaluate the different styles and approaches to learning

      • Identify different methods for instructional and cooperative learning approaches.

      • Support system for teachers and students.


Domain 3 activity
Domain 3 Activity Professions

  • T Charts

    • What does declarative knowledge look like and sound like?

    • What does procedural knowledge look like and sound like?

Looks Like

Sounds Like


Domain 4 professional responsibilities
Domain 4 – Professional Responsibilities Professions

  • Spirituality

  • Mentally

  • Physically

  • Socially


Domain 4 professional responsibilities1
Domain 4 – Professional Responsibilities Professions

  • Spiritually

    • Establish a connection with God through morning and evening worship. Take time out and pray with your students that your relationships will be one of respect and communication.

White, 1886


Domain 4 professional responsibilities2
Domain 4 – Professional Responsibilities Professions

  • Mentally

    • Avoid information overload and giving into stressful situations. Practice different techniques that will calm you down when you are faced with a stressful situation.

Gardner, 1983


Domain 4 professional responsibilities3
Domain 4 – Professional Responsibilities Professions

  • Physically

    • Take time for exercise/sports and include lots fruits, water, and veggies in your diet. Keep of away from refined sugars they dull the senses. You want to feel more productive and have clarity and happier days.

Bloom, 2001


Domain 4 professional responsibilities4
Domain 4 – Professional Responsibilities Professions

  • Socially

    • Make time in your schedule for friends, vacations, relaxation, and fun. No matter how hard or how long you work, you will still have more to do the next day. Establish that balance so you will not feel you have missed out.

Sackney, 2000; Noonan & Miller, 2000


Domain 4 professional responsibilities5
Domain 4 – Professional Responsibilities Professions

  • Professional Application

    • School Psychologists

      • Mentally prepare before assessments and meetings

      • Life outside of work

    • Teachers

      • Reflection (Danielson, 1996)

      • Parent communication (Danielson, 1996)

      • Record keeping (Wong, 2001)


References
References Professions

  • Bergan, J. & Caldwell, T. (1995). Operant techniques in school psychology. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation,6(2), 103-110.

  • Cunningham, P., Hall, D., & Sigmon, C. (1999) The teachers’ guide to the four blocks. Carson-Dellosa Publishing Company Inc.

  • Danielson, C. (1996). Enhancing professional practice: A framework for teaching. Washington: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

  • Goldstein, S. (1995). Understanding and Managing Children’s Classroom Behavior. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  • Johnson, D. & Johnson, R. (1994) Learning together and alone: Cooperative, competitive, and individualistic learning. Boston, Allyn and Bacon.

  • Jones, F. (2003) First year resources. Newark, NJ: Fred Jones Press.


References1
References Professions

  • Kagan, S. (1992). Cooperative Learning. San Juan Capistrano, CA: Resources for Teachers, Inc.

  • Marzano, R., Arredondo, D., Brandt, R., & Pickering, D. (1997). Dimensions of learning: Teacher’s manual. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

  • McCoach, B. & Kehle, T. (2001). Best practices in the identification of gifted students with learning disabilities. Psychology in the Schools, 38(5), 403-412.

  • Schroeder, C. & Gordon, B. (1991). Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Problems. New York:The Guilford Press.

  • Wong, H. & Wong, R. (2001). The first days of school. Harry K. Wong Publishing, Inc.


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